How to split the ethernet wire coming from Router into two?

Discussion in 'Networking and Wireless' started by awaisuk, Mar 8, 2013.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. awaisuk

    awaisuk Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    920
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Hey,

    I have an ethernet wire that is coming from the router. Now I want to use that wire and split it into two so two computers have internet.

    Does someone know how I can accomplish this?

    Please link me to any tools that I need so I can get a better idea.

    Thanks.
     
  2. joshwang11

    joshwang11 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    31
  3. tijo

    tijo Sacred Blame Super Moderator

    Reputations:
    7,588
    Messages:
    10,036
    Likes Received:
    1,079
    Trophy Points:
    581
  4. KLF

    KLF NBR Super Modernator Super Moderator

    Reputations:
    2,839
    Messages:
    2,752
    Likes Received:
    847
    Trophy Points:
    131
    You could use ethernet splitter but they require two ports in the router end too AND you will lose speed. Probably 10Mbit/s max with those.

    Basically, it can be split but it's not recommended. Get a switch :)
     
  5. awaisuk

    awaisuk Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    920
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    31
    But what IP address will the computers have that are going to be using the HUB? Because IP address is assigned from the router..? Will all computers have same ip address?
     
  6. ajkula66

    ajkula66 Courage and Consequence

    Reputations:
    3,018
    Messages:
    3,199
    Likes Received:
    2,318
    Trophy Points:
    231
    You can't have two computers with the same IP address on the network. You should be able to address that issue through the router itself.

    I'm surprised that you only have one Ethernet out on it, though...that thing must be outright ancient.


     
  7. Peon

    Peon Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    406
    Messages:
    2,004
    Likes Received:
    128
    Trophy Points:
    81
    That, or it's a dedicated router without a built-in switch. As an example*, most of Cisco's enterprise-grade routers are intentionally designed this way, since they assume you'll just be connecting it to an external switch of some kind, most likely rack-mounted.

    * This really is just meant to be an example. I doubt anyone with either CCNP or enough Google-fu to figure out how to configure a Cisco router by themselves would be asking this sort of question.
     
  8. tijo

    tijo Sacred Blame Super Moderator

    Reputations:
    7,588
    Messages:
    10,036
    Likes Received:
    1,079
    Trophy Points:
    581
    The switch communicates to the router and the computers communicate with the switch, normally in those cases, the router will still see two computers and assign IPs accordingly without you having to do anything.
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page