How to install nVIDIA Graphics Driver in Linux?

Discussion in 'Linux Compatibility and Software' started by Spartan, Jan 28, 2019.

  1. rlk

    rlk Notebook Evangelist

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    This describes how to build a live USB image with the proprietary NVidia driver:

    https://askubuntu.com/questions/69432/livecd-with-nvidia-binary-drivers

    *Don't* double click on the installer after you've downloaded it. It's actually a shell script, but when downloaded it isn't executable and file managers might not recognize the ".run" extension. Instead, after it's downloaded, open a shell (command window) and type

    sudo sh ./NVIDIA-Linux-x86_64-410.93.run

    After you install that driver, you can follow the instructions in the link above to build a live USB image.

    You do need to be willing to use the command line when necessary on Linux.
     
  2. rlk

    rlk Notebook Evangelist

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    Is that in reference to BIOS RAID or in general? Because there are plenty of people running Linux on hardware much newer than Skylake, much less Broadwell. See the multitude of articles on Phoronix: https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=search&q=Coffee Lake
     
  3. Dennismungai

    Dennismungai Notebook Deity

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    Exactly.
     
  4. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    I think this goes to @Ultra Male's point that he shouldn't have to do this. It should just 'work'.

    And while I run Linux myself, I understand the reasoning behind his objections.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2019
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  5. ALLurGroceries

    ALLurGroceries   Super Moderator

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    Err, or click the 'more details' button at the very least. You can look at the system log with Ctrl+Alt+F1 through F5, depends on the distro.
     
  6. Stooj

    Stooj Notebook Deity

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    From a User perspective, you're correct.

    However, from a developer perspective things are more complicated. For example, it's not practical to build Nvidia Binary drivers into any open distro due to licensing limitations. It's also unreasonable to expect Nouveau to function all that well (given it's based primarily on reverse engineering due to lack of source material). Ironically, AMD are lightyears ahead in this particular endeavour.

    Similarly, with DMRAID, I suspect that there's simply nobody who works on it because there are far superior options available (zfs-raid, LVM + mdadm etc). Don't forget, Intel themselves could contribute to the DMRAID module themselves and yet they don't.

    In reality, the only reason FakeRaid exists at a BIOS level is because Windows hasn't really had any robust storage options as Linux has had for many years.
     
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  7. rlk

    rlk Notebook Evangelist

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    I do too, but he's already trying to do something non-default (use BIOS RAID; I'm not aware that any motherboard has it configured by default, if for no other reason than the problems it creates when trying to upgrade hardware). For that matter, Windows out of the box has its own problems, which @Ultra Male's quite aware of, as he provides a service of fixing it up to people. Those problems are of a rather different type, to be certain.

    Linux is different from Windows. Most laptops, unless bought from a purpose vendor, come with Windows preinstalled. Installing Linux is inherently more effort than that; doing it well does require some knowledge.
     
  8. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    Fake-RAID or not, expert knowledge or not, the point is moot. Ultra Male wanted to install, and that install failed on him. End of story. He's done. Kaput. No more. I find this discouraging, as I really think he would sing Linux's praises if he could get to use it.

    With that in mind, this is NOT an untypical story. I've had many non-tech friends, shy away from Linux. That is unfortunate. Linux will not make as many in-roads into PC-land as it could when users are frustrated like this. And this is a shame, since Microsoft, in their evolution of Windows 10, is driving more and more people to the point of making a change.

    Also, I think part of this can be placed at the feet of MSI as well. It's too bad they can't hire 2 or 3 folks to be their 'Linux' team, coming up with articles, shell scripts, and whatever else it would take to help their customers get onto Linux. But for all I know they may have incentive from MS on Windows pricing or looking at keeping expenses down to even do such a thing.

     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2019
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  9. Stooj

    Stooj Notebook Deity

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    The fact of the matter is, Linux at it's core is fundamentally at odds with 2 things here. Fake Raid AND Nvidia binary drivers. These are not problems that you can magically make go way unless Intel and Nvidia both suddenly open sourced their drivers AND actively contributed them to the Kernel.

    If I had seen this thread earlier I would've suggested ditching Fake Raid altogether and this grand total of 3 commands to install nvidia drivers.
    • sudo add-apt-repository ppa:graphics-drivers/ppa
    • sudo apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade -y
    • sudo apt-get install nvidia-415
    It's not hard, it's just different, which is where most people throw up their arms in complaint.

    Otherwise, Linux works fantastically well and a hell of a lot better than Windows as far as core usability. Particularly when it comes to updates. Once you've installed your Nvidia drivers you basically just "apt-get update && apt-get dist-upgrade" for a couple of YEARS before thinking about build updates (or just use the Package Updater GUI included in many distros). Windows updates happen automatically and almost always leave broken garbage in it's wake AND you have to manually clean up the "old" installation after it.
    Not to mention saving your settings/profile is literally a matter of taking a copy of your "/home/<username>" directory and dumping it back out onto the new installation. The idea is so simple and yet absolute light-years ahead of Windows in execution.

    For the most part, Intel only machines and even modern AMD machines have no such issues these days. At least the days of compiling your own WiFi driver modules and Binary GPU blobs blowing your Xorg config to hell every update are gone.
     
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  10. xDjinn

    xDjinn Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thats how I was able to install nvidia drivers and I'm running linux mint 19 (ubuntu based linux). Was pretty straightforward.
     
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