How to discharge and charge laptop battery?

Discussion in 'Accessories' started by goodbattery, Dec 22, 2006.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. goodbattery

    goodbattery Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    Some Customer had purchased new Laptop battery ,but doesn't know how to discharge and charge laptop batttery.Now i will answer this question,thanks!

    A typical charge and discharge cycle is as follow:
    1. Install your newly purchased battery into your laptop
    2. Disconnect the AC adapter and use your laptop until it itself shuts down. In this situation, the battery is fully discharged.
    3. Connect the AC adapter and your battery should start charging.
    4. Charge until the battery is full.
    Repeat this charge and discharge cycle a few times and your battery pack will be conditioned to perform at full capacity.

    Note: Please do not overdischarge and overcharge your battery.
     
  2. olyteddy

    olyteddy Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    468
    Joined:
    May 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,369
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    55
    Why would you want to deliberately run a Lithium battery all the way down? That's just asking for trouble. If your laptop has any kind of Li battery, you don't ned to 'condition' it.
     
  3. HchorionicGT

    HchorionicGT Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    13
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2006
    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    i believe a full discharge once a month helps keep the calibration correct. there's nothing wrong with it. ive noticed my batt meter going from 4:25 (inaccurate) to 4:00 (accurate) after a full discharge.

    to add on to what good battery said, the safest way to perform a FULL discharge is using ur laptop until batt gets down to 10%. Then reboot, and leave the computer on at the BIOS screen. Let it drain to 0% and die from the BIOS.
     
  4. vestige

    vestige Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    42
    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2006
    Messages:
    196
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    Are you sure it is a good idea to completely discharge it? Last time I did that my wear level went from 4% to 6%, then I completely discharged again then it went from 6% to 9%
     
  5. chrisyano

    chrisyano Hall Monitor NBR Reviewer

    Reputations:
    956
    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Messages:
    5,504
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    205
    Full discharges are not good for Li-Ion batteries. Partial discharges cause less capacity loss over time.

    I believe goodbattery is discussing the care of older battery types.

    Read more on the topic in the battery guide.
     
  6. Nicolas41390

    Nicolas41390 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    2
    Joined:
    Jun 19, 2006
    Messages:
    138
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    On NiMh and NiCd batteries, this is a good thing to do, but on LiIon, LiPoly, LiMg, LiMn it is very bad. It adds wear and the battery could over discharge and ruin the cells. On the older batteries, like NiMh and NiCd the cells will die unless they are cycled. NiCd needed to be discharged before you could recharge them or they would develop a "memory" and would never charge to full again over time. NiMh got rid of this problem, but you did not want to store them with more then a charge of .9v per cell, or they would degrade over time. NiCd should have been put to a <.9v charge to store them. But as seeing how neither NiCd or NiMh are being used in todays notebooks, it is not something that anyone should really need to know, but just in case anyone wanted to know.
     
  7. TehStranger

    TehStranger Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    33
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    I agree with Chris and Nicolas... if you got recent laptops that use li-ion, there is no need to do frequent discharge/recharge, you are only killing the battery. I did that for my old Sony laptop and the battery was useless within 3 months.
     
  8. olyteddy

    olyteddy Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    468
    Joined:
    May 27, 2004
    Messages:
    1,369
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    55
    Exactly what I said. And if you look at the OP's Sig, is it any surprise that he just happens to sell batteries?
     
  9. krayo

    krayo Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Joined:
    Nov 1, 2006
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    Well, I'm glad I read this thead. And TehStranger, your comment about Sony makes me wonder what the heck is going on.

    Check out this update utility for my notebook on the Sony site.

    Sony Power Management Settings Utility

    This is a Vaio bx560b similar to the one in this very nice review:

    http://forum.notebookreview.com/showthread.php?t=77950&highlight=bx560

    It has a Li-ion battery.

    I guess they practice the theory, "What doesn't make me explode, makes me stronger." ;)
     
  10. SpleenRippa

    SpleenRippa Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    13
    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2006
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    Hey all,
    RC planes are my life, and I (like countless others) use lithium polymer batteries to power them. They are essentially the same as notebook packs- I noticed that my S96Js pack said 11.1V, exactly what I like to use to drive my planes. Only difference is, my packs (depending on which one) can deliver anywhere from 1A to 80+A..!
    Anyyyyway-> In no way do you EVER want to run a lithium cell below ~3 volts. I've seen packs puff up, and they are prone to exploding. Lithium fires are NOT fun. Nor do you have to condition lithium cells, they don't really have a memory like nickel-based products. Hell, I can charge a pack, leave it on the shelf for a year and it'll only take a tiny top-up to go fly!
    To make a long, off-topic post short- just because you're not discharging your laptop battery at currents that could cook a whale doesn't mean it isn't dangerous. DON'T cycle them, no reason to and the average numpty will probably discharge his cells too far- the next time he charges, they might just go BOOM!
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page