How to adjust Core Parking from inside Windows 7

Discussion in 'Asus' started by Kalim, Jun 23, 2010.

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  1. Kalim

    Kalim Ceiling Cat Is Watching U

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    There have been guides posted which talk about how to stop Core Parking. While this posts isn't that much different, it will combine ideas from different guides, but will include my own twist. This guide assumes that you already know what Core Parking means and whether or not you find it desirable.

    While this guide is a work in progress, the idea of this guide is to edit the registry once and then have full control over Core Parking for both AC and battery. Once completed, changes to Core Parking are carried out using previously hidden options within "Change advance power settings". These changes should happen immediately and without having to reboot.

    Please note that I haven't run into core parking all that much. So, I'm not able to fully test this and would appreciate feedback. Thank you.

    Credit for this guide goes to LaptopNut, mad_man and Mr Pras.


    Warning: This procedure requires editing the Registry and should only be performed by those who are comfortable and understand the risks. You might want to wait for discussion and corrections before attempting. It is recommended that you create all necessary backups. If something should go wrong, you are liable for all incidental or consequential damages. By continuing you accept all responsibility for your actions.

    Instructions
    1. Click the "Start" button, type "regedit" (without quotes) and press "Enter".
    2. If necessary, scroll to the very top (or press the Home key) to highlight the "Computer" branch.
    3. Press Ctrl+F.
    4. In the "Find what" field type "unparked cores" (without quotes) and press "Enter".

      Find will now start searching the Registry for your query and will eventually stop on the key:

      "0cc5b647-c1df-4637-891a-dec35c318583"

      This is the minimum value. Pressing the F3 key again continues the search and it will next stop on the key:

      "ea062031-0e34-4ff1-9b6d-eb1059334028"

      This is the maximum value. Both of these keys are located in ControlSet001.

      Here, a search from the top to the bottom of the Registry will find these exact two Registry keys in ControlSet001, ControlSet002 and CurrentControlSet, for a total of 6 locations. We are only interested in the CurrentControlSet. The other ControlSets will get modified automatically.

    5. Press the Tab key and then the Home key to go back to the top of the Registry.
    6. Press the F3 key until you arrive at the first CurrentControlSet (minimum) key.
    7. Click once on "Attributes" entry, press the F2 key and rename to "Attributes.off" (without quotes).
    8. Press the F3 key until you arrive at the second CurrentControlSet (maximum) key.
    9. Click once on "Attributes" entry, press the F2 key and rename to "Attributes.off" (without quotes).
    10. Close RegEdit, save any unfinished work and reboot.
    Once back up and running, go to:
    Control Panel -> Power Options -> Change plan setting -> Change advanced power settings

    Scroll down and open the "Processor power management" branch and you should find that you have two new entries:

    Processor performance core parking min cores
    Processor performance core parking max cores

    You should now be able to independently make adjustments for AC and battery. Adjust as needed.

    Enjoy.
     
  2. Makou107

    Makou107 Notebook Consultant

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    Isn't there a different way that involves changing a value instead of deleting?
     
  3. Kalim

    Kalim Ceiling Cat Is Watching U

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    The default is to have NO Attribute. If you mean changing the min and max values, then that only locks the value and doesn't allow the hidden options to appear in Power Options. Having the options appear allows you to adjust to taste and not have to reboot to get a change to be recognized. Now that might be fine if you want limited options, but it's not the point of the guide. :)

    For example, maybe you want core parking when on battery to extend battery life, but not when plugged into AC. Since the options carry over to all plans, you can set the amount you want according to the plan you select and it can be changed in realtime.
     
  4. Nekki

    Nekki Notebook Evangelist

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    I can confirm if it works or not. I just can say I did this trick after fresh win7x64 installation and after one month and a half I never have problem about core parking.

    I followed this guide:
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/microsoft-windows-7/486478-fix-win7-i7-sluggish-performance.html

    I checked the new options and appears as expected.... but what I must do. I mean:

    For the minimum the system said:

    Plugged: 10%
    On Battery: 10%

    For the maximum the system says:

    Plugged: 100%
    On Battery: 100%

    Are those values OK?
     
  5. Kalim

    Kalim Ceiling Cat Is Watching U

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    I had the same values. My guess is that those are the default ones.
     
  6. hakira

    hakira <3 xkcd

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    Nice quick guide as always kal, I'll be sure to give it a shot when mine arrives.
     
  7. <MarkS>

    <MarkS> Notebook Village Idiot

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    Cool guide!

    Also, The "Attribute" key can just be renamed instead of deleted - for example, mine are "Attribute Old" .

    For those who really like to tinker...
    If one digs around in Windows Server 2008 whitepapers, there's lots of other fun power settings. Just save the entire HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power\PowerSettings registry hive and dig in to other power management stuff. :)
     
  8. Mr Pras

    Mr Pras Notebook Deity

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  9. LaptopNut

    LaptopNut Notebook Virtuoso

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    As I mentioned in the other thread. The easiest way to check the Core parking behaviour, especially after you have made changes is to run the built in Windows 7 Resource Manager. You can do that from the Start, Run Menu. Resource Manager is similar to the standard TaskManager but it will show you exactly which Cores are parked and which ones are not. Cores will have a label near them saying ''Parked'' for example.

    This is very useful because you can observe the behavior of Cores while idle and under load to see whether your settings are correct or not.
     
  10. LaptopNut

    LaptopNut Notebook Virtuoso

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    I didn't even think of renaming the keys. That is a much better idea because it is much easier to rectify any mistakes, identify changes or make corrections.
     
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