How often do you use Launchpad?

Discussion in 'Apple and Mac OS X' started by Mitlov, Jun 10, 2012.

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How often do you use Launchpad?

  1. I don't have Lion, so I don't have Launchpad

    2 vote(s)
    6.1%
  2. I have Lion, but I never use Launchpad

    20 vote(s)
    60.6%
  3. I use it, though less often than the dock

    7 vote(s)
    21.2%
  4. I use it about as much as the dock

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  5. I use both it and the dock, but I use launchpad more often

    2 vote(s)
    6.1%
  6. I only use Launchpad to launch programs

    2 vote(s)
    6.1%
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  1. masterchef341

    masterchef341 The guy from The Notebook

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    and i almost forgot- you can also drag your application folder to the dock and use stacks to launch your applications if you want. that's sort of similar to a start menu style.

    i suppose you could also use the terminal to do it manually.

    i can't imagine anyone is dying for more ways to launch applications.
     
  2. doh123

    doh123 Without ME its just AWESO

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    yeah, you can put any folder on your right side dock and it works kinda like a "start menu" if you put it in List form.
     
  3. bogatyr

    bogatyr Notebook Evangelist

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    Well, I wasn't thinking that I needed more but rather that I don't understand why anyone would dislike Launchpad. Seems like a perfect fit if you have more apps than your dock can reasonably fit.

    The way it feels to me is:
    Launchpad = Start Menu, all your programs in folders (though only 1 layer of folders vs Windows' multiple layers)
    Dock = Windows 7 style task bar where you can pin applications to it
    Spotlight = Start menu and typing an app name (I always hit the start button on the keyboard and type out the program name)
    Finder = Explorer

    I think Launchpad is a great addition and fills a large void as I couldn't imagine not having a start menu style list of installed applications.
     
  4. masterchef341

    masterchef341 The guy from The Notebook

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    i guess the fact that the only method I use to launch applications in windows is extremely similar is relevant:

    windows key + first few letters of application name + enter

    I'm not really interested in clicking through the start menu or clicking around the launchpad. If I could get a grid-list of my applications and touch the one i wanted to run (iOS style) I might use that. But I don't think I can get any faster than the system I use now with a trackpad.
     
  5. bogatyr

    bogatyr Notebook Evangelist

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    This is also my most used method. However on a computer I am unfamiliar with, click navigating the start menu is where I sometimes end up.
     
  6. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    This comparison gets really, REALLY close with Windows 8 when the Start Menu is replaced by a full-screen, tablet-style, one-layer "Start Screen." (You can either look through it launchpad-wise, or open it and start typing spotlight-wise). Due to the evolution of both operating systems, Windows 8 is more similar interface-wise* to OSX than it ever has been before.

    * (I mean in terms of function, not look; the switch from Aero styling to Metro styling actually takes Windows dramatically away from OSX in terms of aesthetics).

    The Start Screen, Windows 8's functional equivalent of the Launchpad:

    [​IMG]
     
  7. Ichinenjuu

    Ichinenjuu Notebook Deity

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    I use it fairly often. I can't fit all the programs I use on the dock (at least, I don't want to), so I launch the Launchpad every time I want to use something like iBooks Author, BitTorrent, All2Mp3, GarageBand, PhotoBooth, etc. Compared to other programs I use, I don't use those as much, but when I need them, the Launchpad is the way I access them.
     
  8. HLdan

    HLdan Notebook Virtuoso

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    Ditto. I can't deal with clutter and the Dock gets cluttered and I don't care to add the Applications folder to the Dock which again adds clutter. . I don't like going into the Finder to access my applications so Launchpad was the right answer for me. I also like how I can create subfolders like in iOS.
     
  9. dmk2

    dmk2 Notebook Evangelist

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    Launchers traditionally came in three basic flavors:
    1. Quick launchers optimized for launching a small number of apps or files with minimum user input
    2. Menus and organizers for handling larger sets of apps and files
    3. Search tools

    I don't think these are mutually exclusive and to work efficiently you need a combination. While it wasn't perfect, the old default in OS X (Dock with sticky Applications folder) provides a better combination of 1&2 than Launchpad. I still keep a small number of app icons in the Dock for quick access and also keep the Applications folder in the Dock. I particularly like viewing the Applications folder as a stack in List view because it fits more on the screen at once and has nicely cascading subfolders.

    Launchpad fails at being a good quick launcher because it insists on presenting all your apps, forces you to declutter the mess, and it's too slow. Launchpad is also sub-optimal for dealing with large numbers of applications because the icon grid presentation is not space efficient and it's cumbersome to organize. Launchpad also has some strange quirks regarding app removal.

    It's a good interface for touch screen input where you don't have a pointer and the lack of fine control dictates a minimum icon size and spacing. But user interfaces that are designed for touch screen input are sub-optimal when used with pointer-based input and vice-versa.
     
  10. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    Although it's cumbersome to manually organize the launchpad, at least you can do it. With the applications folder, everything is sorted alphabetically, which mixes web browsers with games with productivity programs instead of grouping them. I don't have Lion, but I think I'd use the Launchpad in the way HL Dan describes (only the most-common programs in the dock; everything else accessed via Launchpad, grouped in a way that works for me).
     
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