How many of you dual boot/run Linux on your Thinkpad?

Discussion in 'Lenovo' started by csclifford, Jan 2, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. 2.0

    2.0 Former NBR Macro-Mod®

    Reputations:
    13,295
    Messages:
    7,725
    Likes Received:
    1,016
    Trophy Points:
    331
    The thread is not going to be moved or closed because it's an entirely appropriate subject in the appropriate section of the forum.

    Whatever you post, I ask that you respect the posters in this forum. Calling their opinions "trash" and "ridiculous" is wholly unnecessary, rude and obnoxious. And frankly will not be tolerated going forward. If you disagree with a poster's opinion(s), simply counter it with an opinion of your own in a respectful manner.
     
  2. not.sure

    not.sure Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    101
    Messages:
    480
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Running linux exclusively on my main machine. In fact, never even booted Win7 on my W510 or Vista-or-whateveritwascalled on my T61p. Thinkpads are great for running linux. And powerful enough for virtualization, if you really need a little windows occasionally. Dual booting feels so 90ies.

    Classic: Regarding software installation in Win vs linux:
    Ubuntucat Blog Archive Software installation in Linux is difficult
     
  3. ALLurGroceries

    ALLurGroceries   Super Moderator

    Reputations:
    15,676
    Messages:
    7,123
    Likes Received:
    2,227
    Trophy Points:
    331
    Code:
    int engage_sarcasm() {
    
    /* Too bad Linux failed so hard at the NYSE, LSE, TSE, half of the world's web servers, 90% of supercomputers worldwide, the Large Hadron Collider... on Android smartphones and tablets. But 2012 is the year of linux on the desktop, haven't you heard? :-P */
    
    return 0;
    
    }
    
    I recently had to load windows back onto my X220 to flash a custom BIOS, which annoyed me greatly. So I now am technically dual booting, uhg.
     
  4. rumbero

    rumbero Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    65
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    16
    You could always burn the BIOS ISO image also provided by Lenovo to a high quality CD and perform the BIOS upgrade by booting from CD. People without CD drive also have created bootable USB sticks to perform the BIOS upgrade. There is no need at all to rely on any specific operating system to perform such tasks.
     
  5. mtt1

    mtt1 Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    5
    I used this method: BIOS Upgrade - ThinkWiki. Worked flawlessly.

    But I'm afraid of the time I have to upgrade the firmware of my Samsung SSD. I couldn't yet find any mention of way to do it via Linux. Even the creation of a DOS USB drive (which is still possible) relies exclusively on their Windows software.

    On a more general note, why Linux? I'm using my system in a way that would more or less be impossible on Windows. Sure, there are ports, virtual machines and cygwin, but the software I'm using is designed for Linux. So for me the question would rather be: Why Windows? Why should I use a system that narrows my options in configuration so much? (Leaving aside free software or no viruses considerations, which are important in themselves.)

    Obviously Windows's approach is one that has mass appeal (or very clever business strategists ;) ). Obviously most people want their computers to work out of the box and won't spend hours configuring it. That's why they need usable default configurations, which should be fine and which has been Linux's known weakness for a long time. But for people who have technical knowledge or special needs that's a different matter. For me it's not that one is better or worse than the other. I'm using Linux, Windows would be unworkable.
     
  6. rumbero

    rumbero Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    65
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    16
    I guess this sums it up pretty well. Windows has its place and is very important in our modern world. There is also no point to fight or compete against it, because it fills a specific need for which it was designed, and apparently does it rather good. Linux has a very different approach, based on a completely different UNIX culture, and that is why some people like and prefer it.

    It may have less than 1% of the market share, but this doesn't really matter, as Linux is not about any share in a market for which it was never really designed, since it was more or less created by and for its own user base according to their own needs. It is here and readily available, regardless of any market share. And unlike other dominant market share holders, it is not mainly a money generation machinery, but does create and supply source code which is not going away even if some Linux business model fails and doesn't produce any money anymore. Linux freely provides its crown jewels to everybody's disposal who respects its free nature. There is so much richness in it, but not everybody is able or willing to understand that.

    Personally i use Linux because it fulfills my own professional and personal needs much better than any other OS. These needs are apparently not relevant at all for the major share of the global computer user base, and that is definitely okay. Most people can't be bothered with the technical understanding needed to start taking real advantage of Linux. But I, like many others, do have sufficient technical expertise to be comfortable with the complexity of UNIX, and therefore Linux is just a straight forward piece of cake for me. To each his own.
     
  7. 2.0

    2.0 Former NBR Macro-Mod®

    Reputations:
    13,295
    Messages:
    7,725
    Likes Received:
    1,016
    Trophy Points:
    331
    Exactly, rumbero. Though I mainly use Win7, I supplement with Linux because I can do certain things in it that I can't readily do in any other OS. Or at least not as easily.

    Linux isn't going away nor is market share all that relevant considering its typical user base.
     
  8. Thors.Hammer

    Thors.Hammer Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    982
    Messages:
    5,162
    Likes Received:
    33
    Trophy Points:
    216
    Well, some of the statements above are ridiculous or trash talk in my mind. Anyone who doesn't "worry about any legal aspects regarding software distribution and use" isn't grounded in reality. There are way too many suits that come up on a daily basis and you can't run a business and ignore legal aspects of software use. It doesn't matter what platform you use. There are commercial aspects and intellectual property on all of them that really must be considered.

    If you don't think Thinkrob was trash talking about windows in his comments, then you simply aren't considering all sides.

    Sorry if you thought I was being rude and obnoxious, but I find the same about you and your cohorts. It doesn't do anyone any good to be that way so I will just ignore this thread from now on. I see no further value with the views here, and I'm sure you feel the same about mine.
     
  9. csclifford

    csclifford Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    139
    Messages:
    485
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    Everyone relax a little. This is a thread meant to talk about Linux in our think pad community. There is no reason to get so worked up, it's the Internet.
     
  10. ALLurGroceries

    ALLurGroceries   Super Moderator

    Reputations:
    15,676
    Messages:
    7,123
    Likes Received:
    2,227
    Trophy Points:
    331
    Yeah that has worked for stock BIOS updates, or using geteltorito.pl, but this one needed a patched flasher, which unfortunately is windows-only. :-/
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page