How many of you dual boot/run Linux on your Thinkpad?

Discussion in 'Lenovo' started by csclifford, Jan 2, 2012.

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  1. csclifford

    csclifford Notebook Evangelist

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    So I installed TLP. So every time I'm on battery do I need to run the terminal "sudo tlp bat" or does it automatically adjust depending on whether i'm on AC or battery?
     
  2. rumbero

    rumbero Notebook Enthusiast

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    I would expect this to happen automagically, at least that is what i remember when i once installed it for a short time last year (i deinstalled it because my Thinkpad is always on the desk anyway). I'd recommend to simply read the fine documentation, either the README files located in /usr/share/doc/tlp/ or the man page for tlp.
     
  3. Palmately

    Palmately Notebook Enthusiast

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    Well the update problem continued even after all the main updates and service pack installation. Unfortunately, I give that win to linux. My wacom works flawelessly in ubuntu/kubuntu. I use kubuntu because the interface is a lot easier to navigate with stylus than unity. The only issue I had was with display rotation. I had to write (well I modified someone else's) a script and map it to the buttons on the display. Honestly, it wasn't a big deal and it was a huge win for me. The other distros i tried had issues with wacom (fedora, debian, arch). The only other distro in which the scripts worked was openSUSE, but I encountered other graphical issues with it.
     
  4. GomJabbar

    GomJabbar Notebook Consultant

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    I am quad booting: Windows 7 Professional, Arch Linux XFCE, Fedora 16 Gnome, and Mageia 1 KDE on my X220.

    I have been liking Fedora, but I can't say I'm a big fan of Gnome 3 in it's present incarnation - yet it won Linux Journal's Reader's Choice "Product of the year award"! Go figure!
    Readers' Choice Awards 2011 | Linux Journal
    The Gnome developers throw up all the roadblocks they can to hinder user configuration of Gnome 3. Gnome 3 is touchscreen-centric. It is not optimized for use on a conventional laptop or desktop IMO.

    Arch XFCE is my favorite at the moment. More difficult to set up, but I like the results better. XFCE is somewhat like Gnome 2 - the previous generation of Gnome.

    Mageia 1 KDE is very nice although it does take the longest to boot up. KDE is probably the most Windows like of the three.

    Windows 7 is Windows - what can I say?

    All in all, they all actually work pretty well. :)
     
  5. Tasurinchi

    Tasurinchi Notebook Enthusiast

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    I had used different Ubuntu and Linux Mint versions on almost all my TPs and never had big problems in any of them. Currently I have windows only in my 240x (Win98), 760XD (NT) and 14" T61 (Win7 Ultimate), oh! Wife's Z61m has Win7 too...
     
  6. FinkPad

    FinkPad Notebook Evangelist

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    what can you do in Linux that you can't do it Windows 7?
     
  7. rumbero

    rumbero Notebook Enthusiast

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    I guess this largely depends on each users' own personal requirements, with no size fitting all and everyone. Here is a selection of what is of some relevance for me:

    Don't bother about computer viruses, don't bother about licensing and license activation, don't worry about any legal aspects regarding software distribution and use, freely choose between various excellent Linux distribution variants without any vendor lock in, choose between various advanced desktop environments and versatile window managers, run and switch between multiple parallel graphical user sessions on the same machine, manage clean program installation/deinstallation via a unified package management system, always have a user friendly command line environment with all the nice UNIX standard commands at your fingertips, and, last not least, freely give away and share the system with anybody.

    Other than that there is probably not really much difference, unless one requires to run specific commercial applications which are simply not available for Linux. But personally, i couldn't care less about the latter, because Linux offers all i actually need. And much more than that: Freedom! ;)
     
  8. seiyafan

    seiyafan Notebook Evangelist

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    in linux you don't need to defrag, where as in win7 you do unless you have ssd. And in linux I never worried about catching viruses.
     
  9. Thors.Hammer

    Thors.Hammer Notebook Enthusiast

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    What package management system are you referring to?
     
  10. csclifford

    csclifford Notebook Evangelist

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    Plus I find that Linux runs much more quickly and smoothly than Windows 7 does.

    Besides if I'm doing schoolwork, I'll have to say that Linux will be my go to operating system for normal/casual use.
     
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