How do you deal with data between your Windows/Linux computers?

Discussion in 'Linux Compatibility and Software' started by Spartan@HIDevolution, Jun 20, 2021.

  1. Spartan@HIDevolution

    Spartan@HIDevolution Company Representative

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    I will soon start to explore using my Dell XPS 13 which is running Ubuntu Linux. How do you all manage your data between your Linux/Windows machines since Linux cannot write on NTFS disks? My Samsung T5 Portable SSD is formatted in exFAT. Would Linux be able to write to it or only read?

    If not, then what is the best way to have your data always synced between both operating systems/computers?
     
  2. Vaardu

    Vaardu Notebook Consultant

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    When I had dualboot on my Zbook with Ubuntu and Windows, my 1TB was formatted as exFAT and I was able to write to it as well as read.
     
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  3. alaskajoel

    alaskajoel Notebook Deity

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    IIRC, exFAT is fully supported since the most recent LTS 20.04.

    If you are using an older version, you can enable exFAT support with exFAT-fuse.

    https://github.com/relan/exfat
     
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  4. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    Is this a drive you use when dual booting? I take it is probably not.

    But for drives of that nature (need a partition to show up between BOTH Windows and Linux in dual boot), what options did you use to mount the SSD partition? is there a "-r" only? Do you think the NTFS support is different in Linux Mint vs. Ubuntu (since Linux Mint is based off Ubuntu)?

    I've been mounting / using a Samsung 860SSD for virtual machines (VMs) for well over a year. It's an NTFS drive so I can use either Windows or Linux to run the VMs. I've attached the picture of the drive/format from disks as well as the mount options. Note, I do not have this drive setup in my /etc/fstab because I don't necessarily want to mount it. I just do it manually after OS start, but only when I need it.

    Note, maybe something like these suggestions would help for attached drives:

    https://askubuntu.com/questions/93109/cant-write-to-ntfs-formatted-drives (ubuntu)

    https://forums.linuxmint.com/viewtopic.php?t=317913 (may not help since it is linux mint)

    Also note, I do use exfat for stuff as well, but mostly I use that on removable drives (using a USB drive docker) or flash drives since I sometimes need to read/write on Mac, and the Mac will only read NTFS based connected USB or flash drives.

     

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    Last edited: Jun 24, 2021
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  5. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Virtuoso

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    NAS or just P2P over Samba. You can go up to around 2Gbps over WiFi, or up to 10Gbps over Ethernet if you need to.
     
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  6. Mr. Fox

    Mr. Fox BGA Filth-Hating Elitist

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    I have no issues with read/write access on my NTFS volumes when I boot into Linux. I even have Linux installed on the same drive as Windows on two of my systems. On one desktop I partitioned half of the 1TB for Windows 7 and installed Linux on the unused drive space. I can access all of the files on the W7 partition and all of the files on the W10 and data storage volumes formatted in NTFS. On my turdbook I have LTSC and Linux on the same NVMe SSD.
     
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  7. colin.p

    colin.p Notebook Enthusiast

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    Maybe I misunderstood what you're asking but Linux will write just fine to NTFS, as I have been doing it for years. However, Windows chokes if I use different characters like ":,;" in naming files. Took me a whole night to figure out why Windows 10 couldn't access a couple movie files, while Linux and Android had no problems.

    I now force myself to only use lower case words separated with a period, windows can read that with no problems.
     
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