How do i properly clean Thermal Grizzly Condunaut?

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Al_Jourgensen, Feb 9, 2018.

  1. Al_Jourgensen

    Al_Jourgensen Notebook Consultant

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    Hello
    I recently put this liquid metal on the surface of my GPU and CPU and also made a square of the size of each in the copper cooler.
    The thing is that i shouldn´t put it on the copper coller, i think it has to much, i tried to clean it with 96gl alcohol but the "square strain" doesn´t disappear and i can´t see the copper.
    I don´t want to scratch this, is there any chemical liquid to remove this?
    any ideas on how to clean it properly?
    Thank you in advance
     
  2. Mobius 1

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    Before rubbing with alcohol I recommend to use tape / painters tape to remove the chemical.

    Copper discoloration is normal, and will not affect performance. But if you wish you can slightly rub the surface with 3M Finishing Pads,No 10144. Just a light rub will suffice.

    Keep in mind that you will create a lot of dirt this way because you're partly removing the copper.
     
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  3. Al_Jourgensen

    Al_Jourgensen Notebook Consultant

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    Jesus Christ......if i knew this i wouldn´t put it in the first place........look to the Thermal Grizzly email reply "acetone should help to clean most of the liquid metal. If you want to RMA a CPU and can't read searial number or batch anymore it can help to use a 10% solution of hydrochloric acid and swipe your CPU several times. Be careful though doing that and wear the approriate safety gear such as goggles and gloves." .... I´m not a chemist....isn´t there any other way of taking this out without scratching the surface? i saw this vídeo could this help? is this compound similar to the one used to take out scratches from cars?
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2018
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  4. tijo

    tijo Sacred Blame Super Moderator

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    Hydrochloric acid sounds nasty, but it isn't that bad. Definitely don't drink it. It is an asphyxiant and if you get some on your skin, just wash the exposed skin thoroughly, it shouldn't cause damage as long as you take care of it timely. Hydrochloric acid is sometimes called muriatic acid and you should be able to find some at a hardware store. Just use it in a well ventilated place.

    Regarding the polish, it could potentially work. It likely works because there is something in the polish that the metal bonds to or that the thermal compound is soluble or partially soluble in. To know whether this would work in your case, you'd have to look at what's in it and how different the compound you use is from the one in the video. As to whether it is similar to the one used to take scratches out from car, you'd have to look at what's in the two compounds. My guess however would be that they are different given that they have different uses.
     
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  5. Al_Jourgensen

    Al_Jourgensen Notebook Consultant

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    I know that Hydrochloric acid sounds nasty, in fact, it sounds very very nasty........Jesus.......my notebook has 2 weeks and i already ruined it.......my doubt is what´s the name on the compound in the video in Portuguese.......i can´t find anything similar, and with the name *Polishing*, i only know the car scratch remover, i´m going to take a picture of it and put it here to see if it matches this one

    i found this one too, but the guy doesn´t say what it is, it seems isopropilic alcohool, but i find this so easy that i doubt it
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 10, 2018
  6. Al_Jourgensen

    Al_Jourgensen Notebook Consultant

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    Ok.......finally i have a solution......i used the polish method, i can tell you that the copper looks like a mirror now, after a couple of hours i clean it all, give me a lot of work........now let´s go for the CPU.........i only made a last clean with isopropyl alcohol just to be sure that even the polish that i used is cleaned also on the copper cooler..........but i can assure you that the "polish" method works.....
     
  7. Mobius 1

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    You don't have to go that much. Rubbing it with the finishing paper works just as well.
     
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  8. Al_Jourgensen

    Al_Jourgensen Notebook Consultant

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    I don´t think so, i saw some youtube videos of people having everything scratched, even the CPU serial numbers, and the cooper cooler was a mess as well. almost losing the copper layer. But this was fine, the result was better than i thought and went well, it does give a lot of work, but if you want to avoid warranty issues, this is definitely the best way to do it
     
  9. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    As you already have found out, the easiest way to clean "old" liquid metal is by using 1200+ grit sandpaper (polishing paper) and just sand it down hard. Before sanding, get as much off as you can with alcohol (or arcticclean or goo gone), and a cleaning cloth or paper first; since you don't want to have the sandpaper do unnecessary work. Then just sand it down with fine grit paper. It takes a few minutes and some vigorous scrubbing, but eventually you get a nice result.

    And yes, you are supposed to "Tin" the heatsink surface (copper or nickel plated, but NOT ALUMINUM-NEVER use aluminum heatsinks with an aluminum base with ANY liquid metal, EVER) with LM, same goes for the underside of the CPU IHS, when delidding...tin that with LM also (gives lower temps).
     
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  10. Al_Jourgensen

    Al_Jourgensen Notebook Consultant

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    I don’t want to scratch the surface with sandpaper, I thank you for your advise, but I saw some YouTube videos with horrible results with that.
    Then polish did the work, I just can’t tell if spikes of 70 degrees are fine when playing.
    And yes I have a clevo P775TM1G, everything is copper, I notice that before doing this.
    I just do want to lose the warranty cause I mess with this.....maybe I have to do the same to the GPU, I’m getting a max of 83 degrees when playing, when it supposed to be 80 I guess.....I have the laptop lifted in wood squares, so the air ca blow like a hurricane.....Jesus what a mess.....why did I try to lower the noise with mods and ...... I’m so regretting this......I really hope I don’t lose the warranty with this play around to give the forum more info on this particularly notebook.....
     
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