How Dell cripple performance explained by Notebookcheck.net

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Papusan, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. Brad331

    Brad331 Notebook Enthusiast

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    When you remove current and power limits, CPU approaching 100°C is a possibility, isn't it? Depending on how the cooling is and where the throttling temperature is set. Without more information, you can't assume it won't reach those kinds of temperatures.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2019
  2. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Virtuoso

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    Bit of a different situation when an individual user accepts the risk and pushes the limits which is usually temporary, compared with thousands of units of the same model with inferior design released to market where every single unit will do it to every single user regardless of awareness, for every day of its short, hot life
     
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  3. Richard Zheng

    Richard Zheng Notebook Evangelist

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    Agreed. Laptops that hit 100 outta the box are bad. A laptop that can be pushed to 100 by the user is good, cause that means it can stay below 100 stock
     
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  4. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Will the new macbooks reach 150C within 3 secs?
     
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  5. Richard Zheng

    Richard Zheng Notebook Evangelist

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    No, it will hit 99 or so and throttle down hard to be around base clocks on all cores
     
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  6. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    5GHz is not gonna happen, correct? I bet even 3.8GHz on all cores will kill it quickly.
     
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  7. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Deity

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    Apparently, 5GHz is thermally limited to 50C so it will only happen under tiny loads. 3.8GHz under full load depends on the number of cores and whether HT is enabled. On my m15's i7-8750H I can barely get there with 6C/HT enabled on the m15, with - 160mV and 60W TDP leading to temps close to 100C, which I wouldn't want to do routinely on this device. Should be less sweat with LM.
     
  8. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    When did that happen? Is it TVB feature?
     
  9. etern4l

    etern4l Notebook Deity

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    Yep. Check out Notebookcheck pages for the new CPUs.
     
  10. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Virtuoso

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    Yes, TVB is limited to low temperatures.

    If the fan profile is set to prefer silence / minimum noise, a laptop won't even idle at 50C, which is why I think it's a marketing idea to inflate "peak boost" a couple hundred MHz more

    https://en.wikichip.org/wiki/intel/thermal_velocity_boost


    I think there's a voltage compensation as well as the frequency boost, like an automatic undervolt based on temperature: -1.5mV for every 1C below 100C.
    (kind of like the stacking -13MHz increments that occur with increasing temperature on Pascal GPUs)
    http://forum.notebookreview.com/thr...ty-boost-isnt-what-its-supposed-to-be.826295/
    [​IMG]
    The problem is that on any single core load at 5ghz the temp will shoot up within a second so the effect is almost meaningless

    An open loop watercooled stock 9900K however could stay below 70C all day long
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2019
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