How Dell cripple performance explained by Notebookcheck.net

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Papusan, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. custom90gt

    custom90gt Doc Mod Super Moderator

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    I'm not sure where I said it doesn't turn on. It turns on and enters the bios recovery page without issue. When you try to recover a bios before 1.4.1 it says "failed" but you can recover a bios from 1.4.1 on without issue.

    I no longer have the XPS so I can't try it via a UWD, but my guess is that it would be a no go.
     
  2. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Then its impossible to access them since SPI ROMs are forcibly locked. If newer Dell BIOS writes to those regions w/o special access code then it'll brick.
    Thanks for testing!!!
     
  3. Brad331

    Brad331 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Those hardware mods don't have much to do with DPTF; they increase cooling capacity for the CPU, GPU and VRM. I no longer include the instructions to disable DPTF in the MateBook X Pro mod guide because at least on this machine, DPTF only does power limiting and that behavior is blocked by ThrottleStop's "disable and lock Turbo power limits" setting.

    But maybe DPTF does something else on your machine that is outside the scope of ThrottleStop or Power Limits. If you want to disable DPTF, look here. I've made a handy reg file that prevents Windows from installing it back.
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2019
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  4. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Dell removed DPTF after many complained of strange Event log id, so the dptf driver is simply to clear off Yellow Bangs in device manager.
     
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  5. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOK's Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    How Alienware Dell handle and resolving their overheating problems (A very nice way to lower tech support costs) on their newest gaming notebooks...

    Dell engineering has designed the systems to tolerate higher temperatures. New rules.

    This apply especially for the new thin Alienware m15 and m17 gamingbook line. The new specifications are...
    * When under heavy load, the average temperature for the m15 and m17 should be less than or equal to 100℃. From now is the max average cpu temperature target equal as Intel's TJUNCTION Temperature (the maximum temperature allowed at the processor die). Amazing! CIGAR.gif
    upload_2019-3-1_3-1-46.png
    https://www.dell.com/community/Alienware/Coffee-Lake-temperature-concerns/td-p/7251354

    Base Frequency Mode (clocks) etc for unlocked i9-8950Hk is from Dell's Engineers point of views called *slight drop in frequency*:confused:
    upload_2019-3-1_3-12-31.png
    https://www.dell.com/support/articl...ing-a-high-temperature-overheat-issue?lang=en
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2019
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  6. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    I love 200C these days dunno why!?
     
  7. Brad331

    Brad331 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Much better than premature throttling at 65°C like Razer. That "slight drop in frequency" is some newspeak though.
     
  8. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Virtuoso

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    As is "Dell engineers have designed these systems to tolerate higher temperatures"

    Umm, higher temperatures are a lack of cooling design and engineering?
     
  9. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    I sincerely think a lot of people here have forgotten basic physics.

    If you want to have both high levels of performance and low temperatures, then you'll need to have a giant, extraordinarily thick laptop that rivals the volumes of large, desktop-bound CPU coolers like the Noctua NH-D15, the beQuiet! Dark Rock Pro 4, etc, that are on the order of one litre. That means laptops that are all heavy, large bricks that are useless for anything besides desk-bound operation.

    If you want to have the performance that you lot are expecting, all laptops have to have some way of dissipating ~200–300 W for the 15" notebooks; up to 1 kW for the really thick ones like the P870TM, or the MSI GT75/GT83, or the AW Area-51M.

    Do you lot not realise that one goddamn kilowatt rivals the thermal output of some small air-conditioners? One kilowatt is ~3.4 kBTU/hour. This means your laptop alone will appreciably warm up a room with no assistance.

    Not everyone wants to carry a borderline desktop on their backs; many of these notebooks are carried and used in a mobile manner every day. I totally accept that some instances are just downright stupid and extreme like the 8950HK in the MacBook Pro (it can't even cool the 8750H, let alone the 8950HK now), but many others are fairly reasonable with their cooling and performance, like the Aorus X5 v8, Asus Zephyrus M, MSI GS63, and many workstations like the HP ZBook 15 G5, Dell Precision 7530.

    There are certain, occasional instances like 'tripod heatsinks', or one fan and one heatpipe for both the CPU and the GPU (hello, Clevo W230SS, my old friend), and lousy fan profiles that can be called out.

    However, it is also hardly fair to judge the thermal performance of notebooks based on a dual torture of Prime95 small FFTs, and Furmark. Such an intense load is effectively designed to kill any hardware it runs on. It's like complaining that a Boeing 777 doesn't go supersonic despite knocking the throttles against the metal. That's simply not what it was designed for.

    Having worse thermals, or 85-90% of the performance for a significantly thinner and lighter package is a tradeoff that has proven to be popular, so I don't see the issue here at all.
     
  10. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Virtuoso

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    That's a fair bit of hyperbole. 1kW ROFL. 400W is a heavy gaming load.

    I don't rubbish on laptops with 45W CPUs. They exist and they're bought in large numbers. I have four. Even the 11 inch W110er with only one radiator can handle it at load.

    I rubbish badly designed laptops with 45W CPUs and greedy buyers who swallow the lie that thinner has no sacrifices (and there are a lot more of them than you seem to realise). An extra couple of mm - thicker heatpipe, larger rad - would solve cooling issues in most of the bad ones. When there is a large delta T between radiator and air, there are large gains to be had from modest improvements in surface area.

    Case temperatures, fan noise, longievity and, too often, even attaining stock performance of the hardware are aspects of the user experience that also suffer when cooling is sub par.
     
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