Hmm... Very new car, lots of miles though... NBRs thoughts?

Discussion in 'Motorized Vehicles' started by aan310, Jun 26, 2009.

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  1. TravisBean

    TravisBean Notebook Evangelist

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    I know they are used by some commercial vehicles. They are custom installs on some taxicabs and trucks. I did a google search and could not find it, but I'm 100% positive they are in use. (they might not be called "idle odometers")

    Edit: I think it was an option for the Crown Vic Fleet vehicle purchase, at Ford's website, for specific orders.
    (Either the taxicab or police package)
    I also vaguely remember reading some reference to the value of a used taxicab when taking into account both the odometer AND idle time readings.
     
  2. stewie

    stewie What the deuce?

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    If you're really interested in this car but worried about the engine, what you can do is to have a good garage to check the compression for you. However, most sellers will not pay for this.

    During the break-in period, yes it is very important to not to keep the engine at the same rpm for a long period of time. A lot of people are misled by the manufacturers and think they cannot go over 3,000 rpm during the break-in period, which is not true at all. The manufacturers are only telling people this to avoid legal issues later on, they cannot tell people to drive fast and slow repeatedly, push their cars, nor go speeding if you know what I mean.

    For old engines, well, running the engine at constant rpm for a period of time will always be hotter than making it run at different rpm. So the so called "highway miles" is pretty meaningless. But I agree with you about good care vs. abuse though.
     
  3. narsnail

    narsnail Notebook Prophet

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    Its not irrelevant, back to my analogy, if I ran for 20 kilometers just normal running I would be less tired and worn out as opposed to me running 20 kilometers stopping and starting the whole distance. Its common sense, you get better gas mileage while driving on the highway because your in your highest gear and keeping a steady pace, and not having to run through gears and using a lot more gas.

    If your buying a car from a big city or center with low miles thats not a good thing, the thing was just driven in the city, and would be put through a lot more than the same car with more miles, but just driven highway.

    Back to the 05 Tiburon, its pretty new, sure the engine and tranny have pretty high mileage, but in that price range your going to have to make a sacrifice or two, your not gunna find an newer car with no miles on it thats in awesome condition, doesnt happen.

    I would take the 05 in a heartbeat, basically everything in it is new, interior-wise and body, you might have a few problems down the road engine or tranny-wise, but so will any car in that price range.
     
  4. stewie

    stewie What the deuce?

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    What I was trying to explain is that "highway miles" are not less harm than "city miles".

    Your engine is made to handle the rev, this is why there is an auto cutoff at redline, which is where the engine cannot handle it anymore if you pass that point. A lot of engines can actually handle a bit pass the redline, but the factory ecu will not allow it.

    If you rev it to redline at every chance you got, then this is more like abuse or driving on a track, then yes, it will cause some stress. But revving it from time to time is perfectly fine. In fact, if you don't rev your engine at all, it will cause carbon build-up and reduce your engine's performance.
     
  5. Shyster1

    Shyster1 Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    First, I ain't challenging anyone, so please don't take me to task for asking. Second, anyone got cites to references on how running at constant rpm causes greater carbon buildup than varying rpm (also, what is the necessary frequency and amplitude of this variation in order to avoid carbon buildup)?
     
  6. Shyster1

    Shyster1 Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    That would make sense as a special add-on for commercial and fleet vehicles (particularly buses, which may be fined for excessive idling time in many cities).
     
  7. stewie

    stewie What the deuce?

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    Shyster, I believe either you misunderstood my post or I didn't make it clear enough. I did not say constant rpm will cause greater carbon build-up, but running at low rpm all the time will. I was answering Clutch's rev question.

    :D
     
  8. Shyster1

    Shyster1 Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    If that's so, then, yup, you've hit the nail on the head (good aim:D); my apologies for missing the point. And since even I'm quick enough to know that low rpms are not good for much of anything, I withdraw the question entirely!:D
     
  9. TravisBean

    TravisBean Notebook Evangelist

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    Here it is, an engine idle meter.
    "Engine-idle meter conveniently keeps track of engine-idle time while the transmission is in Park or Neutral, so routine maintenance can be scheduled more regularly"

    Edit: The Police Package includes it as a standard feature also.
     
  10. Colton

    Colton Also Proudly American

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    I'm not trying to be a pain the butt by no means. :p

    Not necessarily. You get better mileage because you have already established momentum on the highway, and the engine doesn't have to pump as much gas to keep it going. The reason city driving gets worse mileage is because the engine has to get that 2500lbs going to gain momentum, so it'll work harder and use more gas to get it going.

    Back on topic: I'd hold off on the 05. You may have to sacrifice some interior luxuries in order to get a reliable, lower mileage car that'll keep running. ;)
     
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