High pitch noise

Discussion in 'Asus' started by kpoopk, Jun 4, 2010.

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  1. kpoopk

    kpoopk Notebook Guru

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    Hello!

    I was wondering if anyone has a similar problem - my laptop is making a high pitch noise, whenever i am running on batteries. It is not very distinct, but i can still hear it and it is very annoying. When i plug the laptop to AC outlet, the noise stops.
    What could be the problem here?Can a BIOS update correct this?

    Thank you and best regards,

    Klemen
     
  2. moral hazard

    moral hazard Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Can you try changing the screen brightness, it might be the inverter making the noise.

    If the pitch of the noise changes when you change the brightness, then you have IDed the problem.
     
  3. kpoopk

    kpoopk Notebook Guru

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    Hello, thanks for the reply.

    I tried changing the brightness, but still the same noise. I don't think this affects the noise. What does IDed stand for, if you don't mind me asking?

    I heard that BIOS update can resolve this issue sometimes (from a guy, who works at the warranty shop).
     
  4. Kalim

    Kalim Ceiling Cat Is Watching U

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    IDed stands for "Identified" and is more often seen as ID'd or ID'ed. Do a search in this forum. Someone else mentioned a high pitched noise and I think it was coming from one of the regulator transistors, don't quote me on that.
     
  5. LedCop

    LedCop Notebook Enthusiast

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    I believe this is the infamous CPU whine. It's not the CPU per se; it's a capacitor or something making audible sounds based on the voltage/current the CPU needs. Thus, when you're on AC the CPU doesn't have to go into low power modes at all. When you're on battery, the CPU enters into low power states that cause the capacitor(s) feeding it to make that audible sound. One way to test is to run a program that ramps up the CPU while on battery. If the sound stops when the CPU is at max...
     
  6. David

    David NBR Random Reviewer NBR Reviewer

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    Going with what LedCop mentioned, the high pitch sound you're experiencing is most likely caused by your CPU entering different power states (idle state) when you're running on battery. I'm not too familiar with the i5 architecture, but in previous generation C2D processors, the high pitch sound (commonly known as "CPU whine") enters the C4 power state by dropping your CPU core voltage as a power savings mechanism when you unplug your power cord. There are several way to circumvent the whining sound which include; 1 - disabling your C4 mode with the RMCLOCK utility, 2- using your Power4Gear putting your power settings back to high performance, 3 - update your BIOS as you previously mentioned and hope Asus has tweaked the ACPI so your CPU won't go into the C4 state.

    That said, from looking at your sig and if memory serves me right, the i5 processor doesn't have a C4 power state, but will most likely have other power states similar to C4 where core voltages are decreased and/or running at an AutoHALT state (another low-power state). Nevertheless, you should still be able to use the same methods described above to stop the high pitch sound.
     
  7. kpoopk

    kpoopk Notebook Guru

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    Thank you for all your answers and help.

    Seems it's like LedCop and David said - tried with Prime running on batteries and the sound stops, so i guess it really is about the power states of the CPU. Thank you for the explanation.

    So what can be done about this, besides hoping the BIOS drivers will fix this?
    Does the RMCLock support i5 processors, i heard that you cannot undervolt them...
    I used to undervolt my old C2D with RMClock, so i know the program, but there is so little help about this new CPU's that i am afraid to do anything that could screw things up.
     
  8. alyokel37

    alyokel37 Newbie

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  9. fedoramf

    fedoramf Newbie

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    i have the k52j and the HDD makes this grinding noise, not so much high pitched but for any sort of small task like opening word or loading up a page in the internet causes it to make this grinding noise-much like the noises from old PCs when theyre doing simple tasks. i bought this two days ago, havent installed anything on it, just used it for the net so far. i did try your way which seemed to have made it quiter for a while, but after 5 mins it was back again. is there anything else you can suggest? thanks.
     
  10. jamus28

    jamus28 Notebook Consultant

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    This "fix" will also drain your battery and create more heat. Just to warn yall before you go running off to regedit.
     
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