Help with mixed band/channel wireless set-up

Discussion in 'Networking and Wireless' started by bubbatex, Apr 3, 2009.

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  1. bubbatex

    bubbatex Notebook Deity

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    I currently have a WRT54G router with 6 possible wireless devices connected (2 are about full time, 4 others vary). My FZ has a 4965 N card and I would like to take advantage of the draft-N capability - as I use it for work at home. My question - get a new dual-band router like the WRT610N to move my FZ to the 5GHz band or plug in another cheaper draft-N router for the FZ but keep it on the 2.4GHz band with all of the other G devices? I will not be upgrading any of the G devices with N cards.
     
  2. CyberVisions

    CyberVisions Martian Notebook Overlord

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    Even though the 4956AGN adapter will access the 5ghz band (Wireless A), to take advantage of Dual-Band capability you need to have a DBN capable Adapter, and the 4965 is only single band N. If you connect it to the 5ghz band on a DBN router, you'll only get Wireless A speeds, not N. So if you want to take advantage of DBN technology, you'll need a DBN capable adapter as well.

    Also, if considering dual-band, go with the WRT600N, not the 610 - the 610 failed miserably during a head-head DBN router test against other brands. When they tried to get it to work, it wouldn't, so they substituted their own 600N from their network - it beat the rest. Dual-Band Router Showdown


    Having a 600N myself (my entire LAN is completely Dual-Band N), a 4965AGN and DBN adapters on all of my other systems, I can honestly say that the 600N kicks a$$ in reliability and speed. I normally utilize the 5ghz band for my HDX data and PS3 data streams, which are both setup through QoS for priority access to the 'net. With my particular setup I average around 260mbps with a WUSB600N.

    Dual-Band gives you options that you normally won't get with a single band N router. While you could get the speed difference, having all other G devices on the same band will create a slowdown in traffic. Having access to both bands is literally like having 2 separate wireless networks. For my particular setup, I run all my business, gaming and personal data over the 5ghz band, again setup via the Router's QoS (Quality of Service) setting to enable priority access for those devices I use that access the 5ghz band. All other devices (2 desktops, another notebook and game console) are setup to access the 2.4ghz network band for my family. There are no issues with traffic slowdowns, connection problems, nothing.

    If you don't plan on changing any other adapters to N or DBN, then maybe a DB Router isn't worth the expense to you - it really depends on how much data you need to separate. If you have a gaming console like a PS3 or Xbox, using a WGA600N gaming adapter lets you bypass the console's internal Wireless G adapter and connect at N speeds to your Router, and of course on the 5ghz band if using Dual-Band. The adapter connects to the Router via Dual-Band N, but connects to the console via its Ethernet port.

    Having used both Linksys N and Dual-Band N Routers since they were first released by Linksys, I can say that I get more out of my 600N than I did my 300N, especially with as many network devices that I have. In addition to having a fully DBN network, I also use Linksys' Speed Meter & Network Magic for network management and speed / signal monitoring. Being web consultant, I need the speed and flexibility that my network provides, but you'll have to determine whether or not you've got the same need/requirements for your own setup. I will say that if you've got a family that likes to download stuff at the same time you are, then go with Dual-Band.
     
  3. bubbatex

    bubbatex Notebook Deity

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    Thanks Cyber - but even with the internal card, I should still get a bump in speed over existing G and I would be on a different band - correct? Just not full N?
     
  4. bmwnick

    bmwnick Notebook Consultant

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    I have the wrt610n and i replaced the wrt600n with it...that being said im pretty sure the firmware they released in january fixed the issues stated in your link as my wrt610n get more stable (and faster) connection around 260-300mbps where as the wrt600n was usually 180-240mbps and was very jumpy both did a good job but i would have to say the wrt610n is superior to the wrt600n
     
  5. bubbatex

    bubbatex Notebook Deity

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    Hey - back again. I did not do anything over the past year as far as routers are concerned, but have added more devices. We now have a PS3 on the network and my son does not like the skipping while playing NBA Live!

    Anyway - any new simultaneous dual-band routers out I should be looking at? I still want to prioritize my office PC on the network as I use Skype.
     
  6. bmwnick

    bmwnick Notebook Consultant

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    i have the wrt-610n & intel4965 if u get it and need help PM me
     
  7. bubbatex

    bubbatex Notebook Deity

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    Thanks - I have seen that one recommended before. I am also thinking about a powerline setup.
     
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