Heat pipe isn't working on core 2 duo mobile?

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by chris89, Mar 1, 2012.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. chris89

    chris89 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    45
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    31
    I noticed my gateway m-6827 is running hot with a core 2 duo t5750. When at full load it throttles back to 1.6Ghz until it cools then heats back up to 83*C at 2Ghz then it throttles back to 1.6Ghz. It does this continuously. I have re pasted several times and the heat simply isn't transferring to the heatsink. The heat pipe gets hot at the core and 1" down the heat pipe it goes cold. I don't get why it's running so hot? I mean do heat pipes stop working? I might order a new cpu heatsink and hopefully it will work better.

    I'm upgrading to the T8300 Core 2 Duo Penryn core and it should run cooler. I just don't want it to throttle back all the time... What should I do? Do you know where I can find a brand new cpu heatsink for my Gateway M-6827?

    Thanks
     
  2. miro_gt

    miro_gt Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    433
    Messages:
    1,751
    Likes Received:
    4
    Trophy Points:
    56
    heat pipes usually dont fail. If you get some physical damage then it mayl leak out and become useless.

    check if your CPU throttles because of another component that may get too hot and thus send the ProcHot signal to the CPU to slow down. That happened to the Dell D630 that we have here, lol.

    nonetheless ensure that you have enough thermal paste covering all the chip area, and that the heat sink holds tight to the chip.
     
  3. chris89

    chris89 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    45
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Yeah it's tight and if I unplug the fan after 10 minutes the heat will transfer to the heatsink but isn't very hot. All the heat is right at the part of the heatsink that connects to the core. There's plenty of paste and it's tightly secured. It idles at 65*C and 30 seconds of 2Ghz load will hit 85*C and throttle back to damn near 1Ghz. I F*ing hate this. Do I need a new heatsink with a fresh heatpipe? The heatpipe is copper and the heatsink is aluminum. This thing runs so damn hot and the cpu is trying its best but it's still way too hot. The heat isn't transferring to the heatsink. It's just chilling at the core and not transferring to the heatsink hardly at all. The heatsink is faulty. I have used the same methods and thermal paste of tons of other equipment with no issues. It's just this POS gateway crap is complete crap when it's comes to engineering. The air coming out of the exhaust is cold. I've never had issues with lapping but i did a lap on the core and heatsink. didn't help at all. The laptop runs fine, it just throttles back continuously because of the stupid piece of heatsink.
     
  4. naton

    naton Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    806
    Messages:
    2,044
    Likes Received:
    5
    Trophy Points:
    56
    I think that the following CPUs are bad CPUs: T5450, T5550, T5750, and T5800
    While the T junction is 100c or 105c for most socket P CPUs, the above have a T junction of 85c. I believe that these are possibly T6000, T8000 or P8000 series CPUs that failed to pass Intel quality test.

    I used to have a T5450 and I have a T5550. I think they failed to pass the quality test because when usually the difference in temperature between both core is about 1 to 2c, with these CPUs the difference in temperature is up to 6c. I had the T5450 installed on an HP Pavilion dv2899 laptop and now I have a T5550 on an Compaq laptop. In both cases the temperatures under stress with the factory thermal paste were near the 85c mark. Even after replacing the paste with Arctic cooling MX-3 the temperature dropped to only around 77-78c.

    The only method to keep the temperatures under control with these CPUs is to undervolt them with RMclock or a similar software. In my case this helped drop the temperature to a maximum between 60 and 65c. I was able to use the lowest available Vcore for all multipliers.

    If you didn't bend or damage the heatsink then you don't need to replace it. Intel should have used a T junction of 100 or simply lowered the clock of these CPUs to ensure that they stay way below the 85c threshold.
     
  5. Prema

    Prema Your Freedom, Your Choice

    Reputations:
    8,640
    Messages:
    6,238
    Likes Received:
    16,081
    Trophy Points:
    681
    For the liquid in heatpipes to vaporize at lower degrees they are under pressure. Sometimes they come with too less or even a leak right out of the factory.
    To see if the heatpipe transfers the heat properly you can put the cpu end in hot water (let it first boil and cool down a bit then only put the cpu end in) and hold the other end at the fan grills. It should reach a temperature that is to hot to touch very fast. If you can still touch it after a few seconds its broken.
     
  6. chris89

    chris89 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    45
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    31
    Thanks guy's! Yeah the Heatsink is bad. I'll order a new one. Well used. I hope used is sufficient? Ebay for $20 shipped... Anyway I get my T8300 today hopefully! I'm hella excited! I hope the T8300 will at least run with the heat sink for the moment until I get a new heatsink.
     
  7. jimbob83

    jimbob83 Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    500
    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    Used is fine as long as the liquid in the heatpipe hasn't leaked out and the heatsink itself isn't warped or otherwise damaged.
     
  8. chris89

    chris89 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    45
    Messages:
    244
    Likes Received:
    13
    Trophy Points:
    31
    What do you mean warped? like the part to contacts the cpu? My heatpipe looks dark brown and not the typical lighter copper color. Heat doesn't transfer past the dark portion of the pipe even know it's not pinched. Heat transfers but only when the fan is off then it'll transfer. It's hard to explain how inefficient this heatsink is. I suppose I will pick up a used heatsink and see how it works. Otherwise I guess I'd have to shell out $35-40 for a new looking one. There's this heatsink that's 100% copper that goes on other m-series laptop's from gateway that would work. However the heatsink is glued to the fan part. How would I go about removing the heatsink from the fan housing? Put it in a 350* F over for 30 minutes to melt the glue?

    thanks

    I uploaded pics of the heatsink. The one with the aluminum heatsink/ copper pipe is for my m-6827. The Other pic is for m-6824 with it's full copper pipe to full copper heatsink fins. I think it's much more thermally conductive than the stock m-6827 aluminum fins to copper pipe. Wouldn't you say? So I need to unglue the heatsink from the metal fan housing. Being an idiot I broke an m-6824 trying to pry off the heatsink from the glue. I got it for $5. I wish I wouldn't have broken it. It was pissing me off that the god damn thing was glued on so I just broke it. Any thoughts?
     

    Attached Files:

  9. jimbob83

    jimbob83 Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    500
    Messages:
    509
    Likes Received:
    0
    Trophy Points:
    30
    Yes, the part that contacts the CPU has to sit flat on the die.
     
  10. K-TRON

    K-TRON Hi, I'm Jimmy Diesel ^_^

    Reputations:
    4,412
    Messages:
    8,077
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    205
    There is no "heat pipe" on that heatsink. That is simply an annealed piece of solid copper.

    That heatsink is assembled with a brazing process involving silver solder. You will not be able to separate the components in an oven. You would need an acetylene torch to melt the solder (900F-1200F) - which I do not advise.

    What affects the performance of any heatsinks is:
    1) how flat the heatsink lays atop the processor die
    2) what interface material is used between the processor dies and the heatsink (thermal pad, copper shim, thermal compound, etc)
    3) ventilation of the designed laptop
    4) the thermal potential of the fan cooling it

    Now that you have your computer apart. Clean both the heatsink and the cpu die with rubbing alcohol and q-tips. When clean grab a charcoal pencil and draw on your cpu die. Cover it in graphite and then proceed to install your heatsink. Tighten it up good, and then remove it. Did any charcoal come in contact with the heatsink? If no, then the gap between the cpu and the heatsink is too high for the processor to effectively transfer heat into. That could be the cause of 1) the locking clips on the heatsink screws are machined too far in, preventing the heatsink from coming a few thousandths of an inch closer to the die, or 2) the nominal thickness of the cpu die you have is thinner than average - unlikely
    If only a little charcoal has smudged onto the heatsink, not enough to cover the entire processor die, your heatsink is warped, and needs replacing
    If the entire die is present on the charcoal transfer to the heatsink, then your problem is related to expired or improperly installed thermal paste, or a fan which is only engaging at very high temperatures.
    Clean off all charcoal/graphite/crayon or whatever you used with rubbing alcohol before powering up the computer.

    I would investigate the fan, is it working at all?
    I have fixed a number of laptops which had fan controller failures. Often, cheap voltage regulators are used on motherboards which fail from high temperatures which either prevent the processor/graphics card fan from coming on in any resistance mode, namely anything but when full power is needed, or locks the fan at full speed all of the time. Both are easy to fix if you know what to look for.

    Chris
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page