Had to put the Vaio VPCZ13 inside the freezer to update to Fall Creators Update

Discussion in 'VAIO / Sony' started by Paloseco, Oct 21, 2017.

  1. Arrrrbol

    Arrrrbol Notebook Evangelist

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    Last edited: Oct 22, 2017
  2. Paloseco

    Paloseco Notebook Evangelist

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  3. galaxyge

    galaxyge Notebook Consultant

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    Thermal problems can even be found in 2015 mobile phones. Just put my Sony Z5 into the freezer for some cache cleaning task which caused it to overheat and shutdown before.
    Thanks for the hint!!

    IMG_0337.JPG


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
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  4. anytimer

    anytimer Notebook Deity

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  5. anytimer

    anytimer Notebook Deity

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    The upgrade to 1709 worked, but things are a little buggy. The NVIDIA driver 342.01 (duly patched) kept failing to install. Installed it manually via device manager, but some components were still missing, so I ran the NVIDIA installer again, and it uninstalled the driver and the installation failed again. Sigh! Anyway, installed the drivers through device manager again (for the graphics adapter and HD Audio separately). The NVIDIA control panel appeared in the desktop context menu after rebooting.

    Windows Task Manager is showing TWO ethernet interfaces - I only have one. I think it is supposed to show the GPU performance graph also, which it isn't but that might be because the GPU is very old.

    I have a third party firewall installed, but Windows doesn't know, and keeps bugging me to turn the Windows firewall on.

    Some things that I don't like in this version: The power options panel only shows the currently selected plan - nothing else. To change the plan, you have to go to Windows Mobility, then choose the plan under 'battery status'.
     
  6. Paloseco

    Paloseco Notebook Evangelist

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    You have to enable Test mode on Windows 10, enable installation of unsigned drivers, and uninstall previous nvidia driver. Also, patch first the driver with the INF patched link is on previous post.

    The driver version is the nvidia nvidia 21.21.13.4201 which is filename 342.01-notebook-win10-64bit-international.exe

    About the network interfaces, to me it's showing 6 because I have virtual adapters from Virtualbox and VMware and such so it's ok. If you go to Settings > Network > Ethernet > Change adapter options probably you have there 2 so they are shown on the task manager which is great.

    Don't be so negative, it's not a big deal and sooner or later you will have to upgrade to have latest security updates and features.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2017
  7. anytimer

    anytimer Notebook Deity

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    I know all that - I've been doing it 7 years on this laptop, first with nautis' and Andrew08's hybrid drivers, then with the BIOS hack and ComputerCowboy's patched drivers.

    Good point about the virtual ethernet adapters.

    Wasn't moaning much about the new Windows release - just about upgrading (in place upgrade) as opposed to a clean install. IMHO upgrading (in place) is more likely to result in a buggy system. Little things like, I'm having to manually connect to my wifi every time I boot up. I'll do a clean install in a few days; let's see if that fares better.

    I like this Windows release. Lots of cool stuff that's there on my Dell Vostro 3468 (i3 7th gen); some of it is not visible on my Z1. Maybe Dell did some customisation.
     
  8. shootehone

    shootehone Notebook Enthusiast

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    Off-topic, but can you share the instructions for the hackintosh? I could never find a completed guide for Z1.
    Thanks a lot
     
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  9. Paloseco

    Paloseco Notebook Evangelist

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    I don't have the complete guide because I didn't do it personally. A tech guy did it entirely. It runs dual boot yosemite with windows 10.
    If you want to use the nvidia 330m you can't control screen brightness, it's always at 100%.

    I don't recommend doing it nowadays, it's only a dual core and struggles a lot even with basic web browsing, not to say playing 1080p60 youtube videos.

    I guess if you are extremely interested I could take a look but I don't recommend it at all, Windows 10 works perfectly updated to fall creators update.

    The Z13 had a great screen back in the day, but if you are buying a new computer I recommend you a 120Hz screen like the MSI GT73VR, it has much less screen ghosting (didn't try hackintosh on the msi, but Windows 10 and linux work perfectly).
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2018
  10. Jungle Boy

    Jungle Boy Newbie

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    Paloseco, I had the exact same problem as you, and came up with the same solution!

    I own a Vaio VPCZ1 running Windows 10 which requires a little bit of work to set up but it's a great computer so I refuse to toss it aside. Problem is that the beast occasionally overheats and shuts off. I dealt with that by adjusting my power profile and reducing the CPU to 80% of normal. Problem solved, for most situations...

    ... Except for these damn Windows 10 updates which ignore my power settings, ramp the CPU all the way to 100%, which invariably causes the computer to overheat and shut off halfway through upgrades. Most recently I wasn't able to even boot up after an upgrade went south, so I was starting to get pissed off. Since the computer appeared to be overheating while upgrading, I figured, why don't I stick the computer in the freezer just before the upgrade and see if I can keep it cool enough to not shut down...

    First time I didn't have the computer cool enough, and it still crashed. Damn! Was this the end of this machine, time to finally upgrade? I wasn't ready to give up! On try #2, I put the computer in the freezer even earlier, when the upgrade was at 80%. That gave it a good hour of frigid temperatures, by the time the upgrade started the laptop was like an ice block. I was worried a little that the screen may have been permanently damaged due to the cold (frost inside the screen), but THE UPGRADE WORKED! For the first time ever, it went all the way through the upgrade process without crashing! After defrosting, the screen was back to normal, BTW.

    Microsoft definitely should be better about ensuring that these upgrades don't overheat computers, so hopefully in the future this is something they can revise in their code.

    FYI after I came up with the freezer idea independently, but before I tried it, I googled freezer and Windows 10 update to see if anyone else had tried something crazy like that, so it was your note that gave me the confidence to go forward. Thanks again!

    I'm now 8 years with this Z1 and still going strong! (Had to pull the DVD drive and replace it with a 2nd SSD once the original one died and was basically irreplaceable, but otherwise works well). Love this machine.
     
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