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Guide to Cooling Down Your Notebook Computer

Discussion in 'Notebook Dummy Guide Articles' started by Charles P. Jefferies, Jun 22, 2006.

  1. lebob23

    lebob23 Notebook Evangelist

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    I want to use heatsinks does anyone know if it will work on a n50 or n51?
     
  2. phill1978

    phill1978 Notebook Consultant

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    not true. I have an old (2009) Packard bell HG-1 laptop that i inherited (literally the owner passed away and it was in the will) the laptop was moderate on lowish volume at first and after a two years it was progressively making more and more noise,fans would spool too 80-100% even watching 480p youtube (blamed it on linux's poor fan control for a long time)

    So i had enough and decided to clean.

    on idle the cpu (core duo T1600 @ 1.6ghz) was 60 deg and the fans were really whiny, like they were in pain with the temps leaving the exhaust really hot they would never really spin down for hours. I hoovered the exhaust and the idle went to 55deg. I thought what the hell the laptop owes me nothing, i opened her up cleaned hovered the fan and used some near dry detol wipes on the end of a tiny screwdriver so all the fan blades looked clean. put it all back together

    idle is now 44deg! the fan whine has completley gone and it sounds smooth like a brand new unit, i can barely hear it, and mostly it now doesn't even need to use the fan :)

    so over 60deg idle down to 44idle from some good old fashioned cleaning. It wasn't even that dusty in reality ! and to be fair the cooling on this laptop is very basic in design.

    it might be placebo but the system also feels more responsive now?

    *edit just played some games which usually get the cpu 80deg and now its 51deg max :D
     
  3. Harikrl

    Harikrl Notebook Geek

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    Nice writing charles!
    Understanding one's laptop's exhaust vents, its position and the direction of air outflow should be the primary step.
    Before buying a cooling pad, make sure that the fans of the cooling pad are in line with your laptop's exhaust vent. That way, it will provide must efficient cooling.
    Buying a cooling pad with both the laptop's and the pad's fans at different places ain't worth it.
     
  4. m6874h

    m6874h Notebook Enthusiast

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    Or drill a few holes (burn with a candle and screw driver or soldering iron). Then the air flow will be better no matter the cooler pad.
    I find a big effect for cooling by adding some holes where the heat pipe runs. Decent size holes also not tiny ones (just a bit smaller than your pinky nail).

    Heat needs to escape. Heat and cold will combine much like conduction effect.
     
  5. Fahid

    Fahid Notebook Enthusiast

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    nice guide, may especially be useful for me as I been keeping my laptop on for long times now a days.
     
  6. Jade Roberts

    Jade Roberts Newbie

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    this is very useful thanks! My Thinkpad tends to heat up and then slows down, I thought it was time to buy a new one but I'll try this out and hopfully that will give it some new life!
     
  7. genomecop

    genomecop Notebook Enthusiast

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    Morning.
    In the first post by the OP, Chillmat link does not take me to a link about that product and the 'Link To Procedure' for the re-paste goes nowhere. Just an FYI.
     
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