GUIDE: Replacing optical drive bay on Portege R835-P56X with HDD Caddy

Discussion in 'Toshiba' started by nebody00, Jun 25, 2011.

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  1. nebody00

    nebody00 Notebook Consultant

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    This was originally in the hdd/ssd thread but I felt that it would be better if it had gotten it's own thread.

    I was able to remove the optical drive bay on the R835 and replace it with a hard drive. This is ideal for people who don't need the optical drive bay and are interested in SSDs. Since SSDs are quite expensive and the sizes currently available are small compared to regular hdds, having a second hard drive is ideal. This is a great solution to add extra space to a laptop that is equipped with an SSD.

    Materials Needed before hand:
    2 phillips screw drivers (one for the big screws and other for the tiny ones) (preferably magnetized or just stick a magnet piece on it to magnetize it)
    9.5mm HDD caddy
    HDD


    Warning: I do not take responsibility for any broken laptops/drives/broken fingers etc. Do this at your own risk. Be sure to take any antistatic precautions when handling any of the internal laptop components. :)

    This guide assumes that you have already installed the SSD and would like to use the extra hard drive in the optical drive bay. It also assumes you are comfortable working on computers and know not to randomly touch stuff when the laptop is open.


    Installing ODD Caddy for Toshiba R835-P56X (I do not know if this works for R830, R835-P50x, R835-P55x but there's a high possibility it should):

    I ordered the DV22 caddy off ebay. It was around $16. There is a DV21 caddy and it should work as well (it just has different color schemes).
    NEW SATA 2nd HDD Hard Drive Caddy 9.5mm Universal DV22 | eBay

    First unplug the power cord from the laptop.
    Flip the laptop and remove the battery: There are two latches.

    Now with the laptop still flipped, orient the laptop so that the battery compartment is facing away from you.

    Unscrew the 20 or so screws with appropriate screw driver (I used one from a Glasses repair kit+a magnet).
    -You will notice there are three panels in middle. You will have to unscrew those since they hide additional screws underneath.
    -One of those panels give access to the ram, the other for the hdd, and the smaller one I don't know.

    Now after you have unscrewed all the screws, you can now slowly open the laptop from left to right (with battery compartment still facing away from you).
    This should be done very gently and it should come off easily (if not you may need to check if you unscrewed everything). There will be some slight resistance as you lift it up since there will be foam padding underneath the bottom cover.

    After you have gotten the bottom cover off, you will be staring at the inner workings of your laptop. You will notice the Optical drive is in the lower left corner of the laptop. Gently lift the drive but take note that it is still attached to the SATA connector by 2 screws. Remove the screws and gently remove the SATA connector from the back of the drive.

    After that you should be able to take out your optical drive. You will note there are 3 separate brackets screwed into each of the sides of the drive.

    Optical Drive taken out
    (NOTE: Top and Right Brackets were removed in the picture)

    These brackets hold the drive in place when it is in the laptop and you will remove these for later usage.

    Picture of where Brackets should be from side
    Brackets of Top/Right/Bottom on the Optical Drive

    Also the front bezel is removable by gently prying it off (had the bezel facing me and I pried from right to left).
    Bezel removal

    Preparing the HDD CADDY


    Now with the DV22 (DV21) caddy in hand, install the HDD (not going into details here since you should be able to do this). After installing the hdd and securing it with the provided screws, you will need to remove the top cover of the HDD caddy. It is held by 3 screws on the top. Unscrew those and remove the top cover. The top cover serves no purpose and it prevents the caddy from sitting flush within the laptop.
    Remove the bezel from the caddy and replace it with the one you just removed from the original optical drive.


    Now install the brackets onto the caddy. The screw holes on the caddy are off by 1-2 mm from the original optical drive. The only allows you to install some of the brackets. Note: you do not need to install all the brackets just some so that the drive is secured into the laptop. I was able to install 2 of the 3 brackets. With the caddy face down and bezel side facing to the left, the brackets I was able to install was:
    (a) the right side bracket underneath the SATA connector and (b) the top side bracket (toward the usb 3.0 port). One thing you should note is that the right side bracket should not tightened all the way and should be a little loose so there is flexibility when installing the drive.

    Now that you have caddy with the hdd and brackets installed, you can connect the SATA connector ribbon screw in just enough to hold the connector in place. And gently place it into the laptop. Make sure the right side bracket loops through the plastic nub that is on the laptop body there and that the holes of the bracket align with the screw holes of the laptop body. There is some wiggling room but the most important part is to make sure the caddy sits flush and that the holes of the brackets align.

    After this, you are done. Put back the bottom cover of the laptop. Going from right (VGA port side) to left (USB3.0 side) and screw the bottom cover and you are finished.

    Enjoy and I will add in the pictures later.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2015
  2. Upabove

    Upabove Notebook Consultant

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    the portege r830 series is very nice no doubt. However, look at the cooling design for it. An extremely thin heatsink for the cpu and no heatsink for the gpu. I am not sure what toshiba is thinking. IMO, anyway. My first laptop is a satellite u205s. When I run prime it shutdowns after around 20 minutes. However, everything else is solid. If Toshiba wants me to be their customer their engineer team has to do a better job.
     
  3. Skeletron

    Skeletron Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thanks again for the guide. I'm going to be attempting the same project as soon as my stuff arrives in the mail. I'll post pictures.
     
  4. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    I'm confused. :confused: The GPU is within the CPU package on the Intel Core i series CPUs.

    My view is that Toshiba have used normal CPU chips and accept throttling to stay within thermal limits rather than pay extra for the ULV CPUs (which would mean higher price for the customers). We are going off-topic but see my post here.

    John
     
  5. alxlbf2

    alxlbf2 Notebook Consultant

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    I see your point but this is the way it has been done. Intel wants to get money and a i3/i5/i7 CPU will produce max 10 Watt more than a ULV CPU ( same range). Its a marketing trick.
    Many manufacturors do this. The chips in the;
    middle of the wafer = high quality ( can be clocked high with less voltage)
    around the middle = can be clocked high with standard voltage
    at the edge of the wafer = can be clocked high with more voltage ( unrealistic); or can be underclocked and a little bit undervolted for weak ULV CPU´s.
     
  6. nebody00

    nebody00 Notebook Consultant

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    I'm also confused as well to his post... I thought the GPU was on the same die as the CPU. Unless he's talking about some other chip...
     
  7. 1994F7PT

    1994F7PT Notebook Evangelist

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    guessing he's on about the southbridge chip which i believe is still in use on core i series enabled chipsets isn't it?
     
  8. cloud_nine

    cloud_nine Notebook Evangelist

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    Quick question, by adding an SSD (along with a regular HD), does that increase power consumption to a noticable amt?
     
  9. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    Take a look at Tom's Hardware 2.5" HDD and 2.5" SSD charts. They include power consumption measurements under various operating conditions. Depending on what you are doing the additional power consumption is likely to be between 0.5W and 2W which represents about 10% to 20% additional system power consumption (depending on what power consumption you are getting at present).

    John
     
  10. SteveDuck

    SteveDuck Notebook Enthusiast

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    photos?


    I'm curious to see what the caddy looks like from the outside. Does the caddy feature the same non-rectangular form as the OD door?

    The ebay photos look rectangular to me, so I'm guessing there is some nasty protrusion when installed...
     
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