Guide: replacing and upgrading laptop batteries

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by t456, Dec 29, 2015.

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  1. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    You

    1) buy a hardware programmer because if you brick that EC, the power button won't even work.
    2) learn Linux.
    3) learn how to disassemble the EC firmware.
    4) learn what to change after disassembling it
    5) recalculate the checksums.
    6) reflash and watch your PC be bricked because you messed up on a checksum
    7) redo the checksums and this time don't forget about the POST startup checksum (fails=permanent brick again).
    8) HW flash the bricked EC again.
    9) Cry in jubilation because you finally got the SHA-1 and other checksums correct and your laptop just belched.
    10) profit.
     
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  2. Red B

    Red B Newbie

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    Or just leave it the way it is and just replace the cells with no re programming :) I guess this will work too...
     
  3. Starlight5

    Starlight5 W I N T E R B O R N

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  4. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    I'm no expert. I know nothing about this stuff. I just type to you what I read on other forums :(
     
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  5. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC Moderator

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    Haha, it's not that bad, really.

    The battery firmware is part of the battery pack itself, not the bios or ec. For some pointers on how to rewrite it see here and here.
    Sure. Won't have the benefit of the extra mAh's when using better cells, but longevity will increase greatly since you're not charging it to full capacity.

    As for buying genuine products; $5-7 is a normal price. Also check negative reviews and buy a li-ion charger+tester if you can; measure the mAh's and ask for a refund if they're way off. Mostly it's 'no questions asked' and you can keep the fake product. Charger is also useful to recycle the old cells in a flashlight (or drop them in an 18650 power bank).
    Ok.
     
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