[Guide] Improving Battery Life on Windows [+Enabling Deeper C States]

Discussion in 'Windows OS and Software' started by Che0063, Apr 14, 2018.

?

What was your increase in battery life after following this guide?

  1. None (decreased)

    23.8%
  2. 20%

    19.0%
  3. 40%

    38.1%
  4. 50% +

    19.0%
  1. Nemix77

    Nemix77 Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    287
    Messages:
    1,086
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Great guide!

    I've already been using ThrottleStop undervolting and disabling Turbo Boost for my Battery Profile.

    Also already been using tweak and added extra Advanced Power Options from TenForums.

    Lastly, I've always disable components I do not use (web cam, SD card reader, etc) preferably in the BIOS and then via Device Manager.

    Don't like to disable eye candy unless there's a program that allows eye candy profiles for battery and AC.
     
    Last edited: Jan 1, 2019
  2. Nemix77

    Nemix77 Notebook Deity

    Reputations:
    287
    Messages:
    1,086
    Likes Received:
    26
    Trophy Points:
    66
    Uninstalled ParkControl, seems to do more harm than good on Intel 8th Gen after further testing.

    While the battery seems better on idle, upon load the CPU has to work harder to get the cores on again which is almost always if you're doing any productivity on battery.

    Perhaps for older gen CPU's where core parking was a part of the architecture then maybe ParkControl would have greater effect on battery life and better control over the cores parking.
     
    Maleko48 likes this.
  3. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    221
    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    373
    Trophy Points:
    76
    CPU Core Parking settings can be manually adjusted by first setting the 'Attributes' DWORD Key in:
    Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Power\PowerSettings\54533251-82be-4824-96c1-47b60b740d00\943c8cb6-6f93-4227-ad87-e9a3feec08d1
    to a value of '2', as shown in this image:
    upload_2019-1-2_9-19-30.png
    Then the setting itself can be changed by heading to Advanced Power Settings>Processor Power Management>Processor performance core parking overutilization threshold.
    upload_2019-1-2_9-22-40.png
    If Core parking is too aggressive, lower the value. Typically you want your cores to be parked on idle, but they should immediately unpark for burst tasks, for example, opening a program or browser.

    Post updated for completeness.
     
    Maleko48 and Vasudev like this.
  4. Mr.K-1994

    Mr.K-1994 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    12
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Have you created a proper Advanced advance Power Options?

    I am dying for it.
     
  5. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    221
    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    373
    Trophy Points:
    76
    Will not be happening. There are too many variables and the effort is not worth the result. It's no longer efficient for software to control hardware - hardware should control itself (E.g. Intel SpeedShift EPP)
     
    Vasudev and Mr.K-1994 like this.
  6. Mr.K-1994

    Mr.K-1994 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    12
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Would you agree if I rewrite the guide? I will link to your guide and have proper credits.

    Thanks!
     
  7. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    221
    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    373
    Trophy Points:
    76
    Sure
     
    Vasudev likes this.
  8. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    185
    Messages:
    673
    Likes Received:
    503
    Trophy Points:
    106
    I tend to agree for newer gens (6/7/8/9...) of CPUs from Intel, manual control of core parking doesn't net you much if anything. It works great on my 3rd gen Intel CPU though. I'm not sure which generation it was that the major switch happened where the CPUs can enter a zero-power C state and completely disconnect from the voltage rail but I want to say it was around Gen 4 or 5.


    IIRC Process Lasso (father of Park Control) allows you to set the above mentioned settings from within its GUI without the need to perform registry tweaks. Despite Park Control not being very relevant on modern CPUs from Intel, I still find Process Lasso is a great tool to use for its various features and ease of access to them.
     
  9. Mr.K-1994

    Mr.K-1994 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    12
    Messages:
    218
    Likes Received:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Does Process Lasso work on 7th gen and higher?
    And does it do anything?
    I don't want to install a piece of crapware.
     
  10. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    185
    Messages:
    673
    Likes Received:
    503
    Trophy Points:
    106
    Yes, Process Lasso works on new hardware just fine.

    IMO Process Lasso's creator is similar to UncleWeb in his programming philosophy. He originally designed the software to help address system responsiveness back when the Windows scheduler sucked more than it does now. According to him, Intel/M$ have adopted some of his initial load balancing/prioritization techniques into their hardware/software at lower levels on modern machines.

    I personally use PL to easily monitor CPU load via its dynamic task tray icon, setting recurring (sticky) default priorities and core preferences for certain programs/services, and easily switching between power plans without needing to use the broken M$ GUI. It also has a "keep awake" function I find myself using frequently when I want to ensure my laptop will not shutoff for a given amount of time. There's also other functionality I don't use that some others may find useful.

    FWIW the free version is pretty usable and not very gimped.
     
    Vasudev likes this.

Share This Page