[Guide] Improving Battery Life on Windows [+Enabling Deeper C States]

Discussion in 'Windows OS and Software' started by Che0063, Apr 14, 2018.

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What was your increase in battery life after following this guide?

  1. None (decreased)

    17.5%
  2. 20%

    17.5%
  3. 40%

    25.0%
  4. 50% +

    40.0%
  1. dampflokfreund

    dampflokfreund Notebook Enthusiast

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    So I have got a really strange issue with my PM981a and Y540 which possibly reduces battery life to a great extent.

    After a clean install of Windows, my NVMe idle temperature while browsing is at 41 degrees which is great and what I would expect.

    Then, after copying large files, temperature will rise up to 70 degrees. That's okay as well. The thing is, after that it won't reach these low idle temperatures I had before until I reinstall Windows again.

    You would think it's the heat stuck in the chassis, but it isn't. Even after a night of cooldown, the next day my NVMe idle temperature while browsing is at 54 degrees, far higher compared to before stressing the NVMe SSD. I have ruled out ambient temperature and software changes as well, it's exactly the same. Just the idle temperature of the NVMe has changed.

    Obviously, more heat also directly translates to power draw, so it worries me that this affects my battery life badly. What could this be? I can't wrap my head around it. Maybe it's a bug where the NVMe SSD is stuck in a certain power level once its stressed? IDK. Is there any way to test this?

    What's everyone's NVMe idle temperature while browsing? Maybe I'm not alone with this issue.
     
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  2. viktor5001

    viktor5001 Notebook Enthusiast

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    I am using a Silicon Power P34A80 M.2 NVMe SSD in my Acer Nitro 5 for over 2.5 years now and temps. have been problematic since the beginning. But it's worse nowadays.
    In basic workloads, even in gaming it's fine (idles in the early to mid-forties ) but in case of sustained transfers even low bandwidth ones like over MTP limited to USB 2.0 speeds it throttles hard after a few minutes or so. Reaches 80-85°C easily. During that time SSD health in CrystalDiskInfo is shown as "Bad" but afterwards it changes to "Good"!
    What's strange is that often the temps. don't fall back to normal even after the workload is finished. Putting the laptop to sleep for a few minutes is the only solution. I suspect poor ventilation. There's no heatsink or thermal pad or anything similar in the mobo for the SSD slot. Heck the M.2 screw wasn't included. The SSD itself didn't ship with any heatsink. However in the time the battery was in good health the SSD didn't seem to impact battery life negatively.
    Edit: I flashed a firmware upgrade yesterday and so far throttling seems to be pretty much gone.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2021
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  3. viktor5001

    viktor5001 Notebook Enthusiast

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    The minimum brightness of the display in my laptop is a little too high to work comfortably in a dark environment ( background illuminated with an LED light ). So I use an app called Color Veil to reduce the brightness even further. But I recently noticed that it has no effect on the battery life!
     
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  4. Che0063

    Che0063 Notebook Evangelist

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    Usually the minimum LED backlight brightness is defined wtihin your laptop display controller firmware. I'm not sure there's any software that will change the minimum DC dimming or PWM signal on the minimum brightness. What I think Color Veil does is simply make all the colours darker, which doesn't make a difference to batter life unless you're usning an OLED screen. The display backlight, which consumes the majority of display power, still uses the same amount of power, if that makse sense.
     
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  5. viktor5001

    viktor5001 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yeah. That makes sense.
     
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  6. anytimer

    anytimer Notebook Virtuoso

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    I'll have to dig it out, but IIRC my old VAIO VPCZ1 had a registry setting to increase the maximum brightness beyond what was the normal maximum brightness.
     
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  7. extremecarver

    extremecarver Notebook Consultant

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    The minimum brightness anyhow will be next to know electricity draw by the screen.

    As long as you use Intel processor and igzo screen processor is the main cause for battery drain. Apple M1 is the only laptop processor to even out CPU and display right now. Let's hope for big little concept
     
  8. Simon787

    Simon787 Newbie

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  9. anytimer

    anytimer Notebook Virtuoso

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    I don't know how relevant this is to this topic, but it might be a good idea to check this if your battery is getting drained even if the laptop is switched off.
    I shut down my laptop but didn't close the lid. When I switched off my bedroom lights prior to going to sleep I noticed a white strip on the screen of my laptop which wasn't visible with the lights on. Apparently the first backlight LED (bottom left of the screen) was not completely switched off. I switched on the laptop and shut it down again, and the problem went away - the screen was totally dark. I've noticed it on several occasions subsequently.
    (btw. this is my VAIO VPCZ1 - an 11 year old laptop currently being used for testing Windows 11).
     
  10. dampflokfreund

    dampflokfreund Notebook Enthusiast

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    So I've switched my boot device from my PM981a NVMe to my SATA SSD and I saw an incredible boost in battery life from that. If you have a SATA SSD drive, you should really do that as well, because Windows constantly accesses the NVMe when its the boot drive and those can get pretty power hungry, especially Samsung.

    I saw no drop in responsiveness or anything like that. But battery life on my aging Y540 went from 4:40 hours regular use to around 5:20h. If my battery had its design capacity, it would easily reach 6 hours when browsing the web, watching YouTube videos or doing office stuff, which is pretty great for a gaming laptop.
     

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