GT80S: How to install Linux?

Discussion in 'MSI' started by etcetera, Jul 11, 2017.

  1. etcetera

    etcetera Notebook Consultant

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    My GT80S (Skylake) has 3xSSD slots and 1xHDD. I want to install Linux on the HDD 2.5" SATA III drive. How do I make it bootable and direct Linux to it?

    What bootloader do I use to give me a selection between the default 2280 M.2 SSD with Windows 10 and the alternative M.2 2280 mirror drive also with Win10 and the 3rd option that is Linux on the 1TB HDD that came with GT80?
     
  2. etcetera

    etcetera Notebook Consultant

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    The correct question is, how to make the 1TB HD 2.5" SATA III bootable?
     
  3. superguy25

    superguy25 Notebook Evangelist

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    Why not just run it in a VM? There's plenty of free virtualization software (VMware, Virtual Box, etc) and you can use both the Windows and Linux environments simultaneously. And stuff just works in VMware these days ...
     
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  4. etcetera

    etcetera Notebook Consultant

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    Interesting proposition.
     
  5. DimitrisCSD

    DimitrisCSD Notebook Consultant

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    You can select which drive you want to boot from in the BIOS.

    Other than that, after installing Linux, you can get something like GRUB boot loader, which is going to ask you on startup which drive you want to boot from.
     
  6. superguy25

    superguy25 Notebook Evangelist

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    VMware makes it quite easy. It's wizard based and the VM can be tailored to run a certain distro (Centos 7.x, Kali, Debian 8, etc). The nice thing is that there's really no performance penalty for virtualization these days since the hardware supports it quite well.

    We use Linux VMs on our security testing laptops and they work quite well. I also have a Kali VM on my GT60 (Ivy Bridge). Give it 2-4 cores and at least 8 GB of RAM, and that sucker flies. If you get VMware workstation pro (not free) or VirtualBox (free), it supports snapshots so if you're doing experimentation and you screw up, you can roll it back easily. Or play with multiple distros to see what you like.

    And of course, you can store the VM itself on any storage you like. So if you want to use the HDD instead of the SSD, just point it to the HDD.

    Best part is if you try it and don't like it, it's really easy to get rid of (just delete the VM files and uninstall the software).
     
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