Google Stadia

Discussion in 'Gaming (Software and Graphics Cards)' started by Spartan, Mar 19, 2019.

  1. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    Price is just one of many issues I have with it. Input lag, low resolution streams (it's just upscaled 720p and 1080p, not actual 720p/1080p), developers and/or Google not programming their games well, problems with Chromecast itself (and having to buy a Chromecast to use it on my TV), your typical internet lag/jitter, so on and so forth.

    But lets throw all that out the window. I have a perfectly-serviceable gaming laptop *and* gaming desktop. They're "free" now that I've owned them for a little while. Pretty sure my USB keyboard and mouse won't lag anywhere near as much as Stadia's inputs, don't have to pay for a subscription service, etc. Nevermind *obvious* differences like being able to play offline. Something "big" would have to come around for me to use a cloud gaming service of any description, let alone Stadia.
     
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  2. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Stadia was $130 to start and costs $120 per year for you to play fewer than 25 games right now with only nine new releases confirmed for 2020.

    PlayStation Now is $60 for a DualShock 4 controller (assuming you paid full price for one, they're easily found for half that on sale or used) and $60 per year for access to 30 times as many games. If you get a PS4 console, you can even play some of those titles offline.

    I'm eager to see what Microsoft does with XCloud.
     
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  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Funny you should say that, the technology used for distributed gaming in real-time could also be applied to any assistive technology using real-time computer graphics with control input from the remote end.

    There are medical applications, production applications, chemical process applications, not to mention AR/VR overlay on interactive real-time graphics.

    So yes, this is a big deal, that's why I am trying to get you naysayers to see the broader picture.

    You don't have to buy it, I don't really care if you like it, but why come in here and be negative all over it when others are here to enjoy it?
    You almost had it there... go a step further... people buy things because *they* like it, not because *you* like it - they aren't necessarily interested in waiting for it to be perfect, they want to enjoy what there is now and experience growth with the technology as it improves and matures.

    When I buy many cutting edge technologies I buy them in their infancy when bugs and problems are expected, that's part of the charm and fun. And, sometimes if I am not interested in spending time putting up with the cutting edge drawbacks, I'll wait for it to be at least stable and usable.

    Right now I see Stadia as stable and usable, and I think a lot of other people do too.
    How would you expect anyone to answer a request like except to point out that money isn't everything, that living and experiencing life is what is important, and that you aren't going to be able to do that while sitting it out on the sidelines waiting for that perfect situation before acting positively.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2020
  4. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    My main two issues overall, in terms of that last post, are that 1) who says that it has to be Google to do the innovating? and 2) innovation and sensibility aren't mutually-exclusive and if Sony (to steal saturnotaku's example yet again) can do it better and for cheaper, that seems like a no-brainer. Hell, if it can actually do 1080p, even better (but idk much about Sony's service). If I hypothetically wanted to do cloud gaming now (ignoring the whole "I have a gaming computer" bit, as well as a console), it seems like I'd be better served by Sony due to the points saturnotaku lists. Or I could wait later for Stadia to get good. Asking for quality services/product and "experiencing life" aren't mutually exclusive.

    What you do with your money is, of course, your choice. I'm just not comfortable giving something like Stadia a positive review/comment when so far it hasn't deserved it, is all. Certainly hasn't earned a position in my monthly bill lineup, though to be fair no cloud gaming platform has.
     
  5. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Right now there are no winners in the distributed gaming market, and even when all of them are refined and optimized I think we can all agree it's better if there are several competitors competing on somewhat equal levels so that they all can share the load of servicing everyone's gaming demands, while delivering price competitive products.

    Google won't be the only one innovating moving forward, I don't know why you would think I would have that position, other than there are no others in the same class of delivery as Google is publicly today.

    If and when any other new cloud gaming service goes public as competition to Stadia I'll be just as interested in them as well, maybe even more so as by the time they arrive they have to be at least as competitive and as well performing as Google Stadia is at that time.

    My point all along has been, please talk constructively about new technology instead of crapping on it without end, being unreasonable in expectations of new technology, and especially with Google Stadia where *every one of us* knows Google releases everything as a Beta, and Google Stadia was expected to be no different.

    It's easy to shoot ducks in a barrel, it's easy to beat up on the unformed noob, it's easy to shoot down new technology in it's infancy during it's initial release, and all of those activities are poorly received in society because it's all nonsensical bullying.

    I would encourage you or someone else to open up threads for discussing any and all cloud gaming services so that you can expound on their wonders. Every product deserves it's own thread as a place to enthusiastically and positively discuss the cool things it does.

    Just like Google Stadia deserves to get a place to do the same.

    If you need help setting up a new thread I'm sure the mod's would be happy to assist.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2020
  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Here's a review after more than one month on Google Stadia:

    Google Stadia One Month In: It’s Nothing Like Playing on a Console — and That’s Okay
    Fears that Google will abandon its game streaming service look as though they’ll go unrealized
    Eric Ravenscraft, Jan 6 · 7 min read
    https://onezero.medium.com/google-s...aying-on-a-console-and-that-s-ok-494144f34caf

    "...after a month and a half with the streaming platform, I’ve found where it fits in my life: It’s ideal for casual gaming, where being able to play on multiple devices might matter more than getting the absolute best picture quality, and for games that don’t require the fastest reflexes. Under the best circumstances, Stadia is technically able to play fast-paced, highly detailed games, but it’s a lot better at the more easygoing, addictive games that you wish you could play anywhere.

    Stadia works, and that’s unprecedented
    Video games require incredibly low latency, so that when you press a button, your character acts immediately. Dropping frames isn’t just an annoyance, it can be the difference between winning and losing. Not too long ago, streaming a game seemed like a task that was just too demanding for mass-market internet connections.

    Today, streaming games works. I was able to play Tomb Raider, Gylt (Stadia’s only exclusive), and the new Darksiders: Genesis all without performance hiccups on both my home internet — a high-speed gigabit service delivered over standard copper cableas well as, briefly, on my local Starbucks’ Wi-Fi.

    The latter feat was the most impressive. With an 8 Mbps download speed, my Starbucks’ Wi-Fi was below the minimum 10 Mbps that Google says is required for Stadia. Still, I was able to fire up Darksiders and play for a few minutes without interruption or lag. I didn’t play for long because it’s rude to use up that much bandwidth on shared Wi-Fi, but the fact that I could slay demons without so much as moderate input lag is a testament to how far game streaming has come.
    ...
    Think of it this way: If you want to watch a special effects extravaganza like Avengers: Endgame at home in the highest quality possible, your best option is to buy a physical Blu-ray player, get the movie on a 4K HDR disc, and play it locally on your high-end TV. On the other hand, if you want to watch old Simpsons reruns, streaming works fine. In the same way, Stadia may not be perfectly suited for everyone’s gaming habits across every type of game on the market (even if it’s trying to be), but much like Nintendo’s Switch, it has a lot of potential as a platform for freeing lower-power games from the couch they’ve been stuck on.
    ...
    Google often plays a long game with its biggest services, and the ultimate measure of its success will not be how well it does out of the gate, but how quickly it can improve. In the past, Google has let some services rot on the vine, updating only every few months or even years, and with very little new when those updates do roll out.

    The good news is that Stadia is already breaking from that pattern. The upgrades and changes Stadia has made in a month and a half have been substantial. They don’t fix every problem (and there are still a lot of problems left), but they’re a promising start. If Google can keep this pace up, we might be looking at a much different Stadia by the time customers start buying consoles next holiday season."

    ...check out the article for much much more...and check out the links in the article, lots of background info and previous articles are shared...
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2020
  7. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    When theres a tech that's worth raving over, sure. So far nothing exciting has come out to make a thread over sadly; the last "big things" have been phones with folding screens (meh) and I guess Epic Game Store (with all the faults that's experiencing). Laptops have been a pile of throttling garbage for a while now, IoT is a basket case of spyware and security holes, and *coins have been.... lackluster.

    Electric cars getting better and better has been interesting, though I've been beaten to the punch there. While not tech per say, Flordi's Brightline train is one of the few successful train services here in the US so that's neat.

    ---

    Personally, tech is just another tool for me, nothing to love or hate. It just is.i like to treat it like any other service or product and if it's good and meets a need, I'll buy/use it amd vice versa. Specifically towards cloud gaming (nevermind cloud anything), I cant see the advantages of it compared to local hardware and for Stadia specifically i cant see any advantages to it compared to competitors.
     
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Do you mostly watch DVD's and Blu-ray's locally then? Better source material and no streaming negatives?

    Or do you stream video's from Netflix and the other services and watch them happily even though they are lower quality and there are network interruptions, lag, glitches and other annoyances from time to time.

    For me sometimes I feel like watching on the big screen on Blu-ray, and sometimes I'm just as happy watching on a tablet or even a large screen phone, streaming or watching a download from Netflix. The quality and the rest is a bit less than what I am used to, but it's still enjoyable.

    That's what that article I just posted suggests is currently Google Stadia's role. It's not always the best quality or experience - small phone or tablet screens, and quality varies based on bandwidth available, but it's playable and enjoyable where nothing else is available.

    That's the niche Google Stadia can fill now, and perhaps it will expand it's features and quality over time enough to be close enough to the locally hosted experience that we won't care one way or the other.
     
  9. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    DVD/Bluray, Plex w/local media, Amazon Prime (just for Grand Tour and House), Youtube. T-Mobile service I have comes with Netflix as well, though I don't use it.

    I don't see anything pointing out that Prime or Netflix upscale their content, so if you could source I would appreciate it. Certainly don't have any lag or other network issues using any of these services (Plex included) given that I have a half-decent 200/200 internet connection and can easily stream actual 1080p content on that sort of connection (4K as well, if I wanted with Netflix/Youtube/Prime, though my home server can't really handle 4K transcoding sadly).

    So if that article claims no lag or input lag or any of the other issues that were posted in other links in this thread, how does that article's writer deal with that? Maybe his experience is a fluke, or perhaps he didn't actually know what he was on about (similar to how Youtube "laptop reviewers" generally don't), etc? Still not really seeing how that article deals with competition like Sony's either, aside from pointing out that Gylt exists(?).

     
  10. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Except consumers will be buying the PS5 and Xbox Series X next holiday. If I'm in the marketing department of Sony or Microsoft, I'm going to include at least a 6-month trial of PlayStation Now or XCloud with the purchase of any new console during that time to further kill any momentum Stadia might have received.
     
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