Google Stadia

Discussion in 'Gaming (Software and Graphics Cards)' started by Spartan, Mar 19, 2019.

  1. Spartan

    Spartan Notebook Nobel Laureate

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  2. hfm

    hfm Notebook Prophet

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    Call me curious. I'm just wondering, it sounds like a decent amount of CPU/GPU power to hit 4K/60. Most people don't have that level of hardware right now. It sounds like we're just going to kill the planet faster once everyone is using high powered data center hardware to get that 4K/60 stream. Carbon footprint of everyone basically having a 45W CPU and a 2070/2080 instead of their potato 1050ti/1060 is going to be real.
     
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  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    That lag though...
    9Xw3IN9.png
     
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  4. Starlight5

    Starlight5 W I N T E R B O R N

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    I fear that once cloud gaming become omnipresent, competitive games will introduce mechanics to counter the input lag advantage of those who play on their own machines. Is that a good thing or a bad thing is a big question, but the writing is on the wall.
     
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  5. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Hard pass.

    Stadia.JPG
     
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  6. Spartan

    Spartan Notebook Nobel Laureate

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  7. killkenny1

    killkenny1 Too weird to live, too rare to die.

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    Not a new concept, et's see there it goes this time.
    However, it's not for me, since I play a lot of Prepar3D (and now trying to begin my F-14 pilot career in DCS), and I doubt serious simulator games are gonna be included in it. Also I rely on KBM and joystick/yoke/rudder pedals for my gaming, and I'm not sure if they support that or will implement it.
     
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  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    AMD's CEO was at Google's big streaming video-game unveiling, and it may hint big plans for the future (AMD, GOOG)
    Jonathan Garber, Mar. 20, 2019, 11:06 AM
    https://markets.businessinsider.com...unveiling-hint-about-future-2019-3-1028045987

    "...More importantly, however, he thinks the attendance of AMD CEO Lisa Su at Tuesday's event signals the two companies could work even more closely in the future.

    He says the "conspicuous absence of Intel from the announcement, suggests a close relationship between AMD and Google, and the increasing likelihood that Google will ultimately announce that it will use AMD EPYC 2 server MPUs."

    A deal between Google and AMD on servers would be more important that the GPU announcement for gaming because it represents a $25 billion a year market, according to Lapacis. He says the consensus only sees AMD grabbing 10% of that market over the next 12 to 24 months.

    As for Tuesday's 12% spike, which catapulted shares to their best level since October, Ihor Dusaniwsky, managing director of predictive analytics at the financial technology and analytics firm S3 Partners, says the move looked like "a FOMO rally with buyers looking to get in before they miss the early and chunky profits."

    He noted that the sell-off in shares of video-game console makers Nintendo and Sony, which both lost more than 4.5%, suggests that chipmakers, and particularly AMD, "may be one of the big winners in this technology."

    AMD was up 41% this year through Tuesday."

    Digital Foundry checked the spec's on both Crytek's RT demo on AMD Radeon Vega 56 and Google's Stadia custom GPU from AMD, and found they match up - coincidence, or did Crytek purposely pick the same GPU that Google Stadia is using? Start @ 04:55

    Either way an AMD Radeon Vega 56 can do Global Illumination + Reflections in real-time @ 4k 60FPS.

    Can any Nvidia RTX GPU do both of those features under RTX assist at the same time @ 4k 60FPS??

    Google Stadia Specs Analysis + Exclusive Performance Testing
    Digital Foundry
    Published on Mar 19, 2019
    Rich has the full lowdown on Stadia's tech specs, and had the chance for an early hands-on with the latest (but not final) version of the streaming technology. Is this our first taste of next-gen?

    Our interview with Google's Phil Harrison and Majd Bakar: https://www.eurogamer.net/articles/di...



    Jimmy Altos 1 day ago
    "I'll stick with traditional current gen and next gen consoles from Sony and Microsoft. Physical hardware and physical games that I own."

    Mixey 16 hours ago
    "Good luck playing Stadia in your uncle's farm in Nevada"

    Maverick Hunter K 1 day ago
    "Give up your privacy even when gaming "

    Sun Shamon 1 day ago
    "so youtube censorship and guidelines for games no thanks"

    Wulf Pz 1 day ago
    "Dope. Now we get to play a Youtube ad every 15 minutes instead of watching one."

    "Introduced during Google’s GDC 2019 keynote, we don’t know any specifics about Google’s upcoming platform. Will it run a virtual machine hosting games you purchase and install in the cloud? Will it be a subscription like Xbox Game Pass providing a rotating mixture of games, only without the downloads? Will it support Steam and Origin?"

    If Google provided Stadia as a cloud "compute" service that allowed us to play our catalog of games on existing PC Game Stores, like Steam and Origin, GOG, etc (Not Epic!), then that could be a "game changer".

    A nice place to play a large percentage of games, low cost, and easy access from the road - work, school, away from home, or even at home if our PC isn't as robust performing as the Stadia experience.

    There are certainly possibilities in this kind of service. If we have to also buy a 2nd copy of games on Stadia, it becomes of less interest.
     
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  9. JRE84

    JRE84 Notebook Deity

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    I've omg speechless...they are really pushing this...if they can keep the ping under 25ms like geforce now....call me in
     
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  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Google is dedicated to being Green Renewable Powered, and if you get a renewable power service for your hook up, it's Zero Carbon for run time either way.

    IDK how the build tracking is for Google, but I bet they are also tracking the Carbon footprint to count their infrastructure buildings, computers and datacenter equipment as part of their overall Carbon footprint.

    Let's see what Google has to say about it themselves:

    A responsible supply chain isn't just the right thing to do for people and the planet — it's also good for business.
    https://sustainability.google/responsible-supply-chain/

    ENVIRONMENT PROJECTS
    100% renewable is just the beginning

    https://sustainability.google/projects/announcement-100/

    "I’m thrilled to announce that in 2017 Google will reach 100% renewable energy for our global operations — including both our data centers and offices. This is a huge milestone. We were one of the first corporations to create large-scale, long-term contracts to buy renewable energy directly; we signed our first agreement to purchase all the electricity from a 114-megawatt wind farm in Iowa, in 2010.

    Today, we are the world’s largest corporate buyer of renewable power, with commitments reaching 2.6 gigawatts (2,600 megawatts) of wind and solar energy. That’s bigger than many large utilities and more than twice as much as the 1.21 gigawatts it took to send Marty McFly back in time.
    unnamed (3).jpg
    Google is the largest corporate renewable energy purchaser on the planet

    To reach this goal we’ll be directly buying enough wind and solar electricity annually to account for every unit of electricity our operations consume, globally. And we’re focusing on creating new energy from renewable sources, so we only buy from projects that are funded by our purchases.

    Data centers are the backbone of the internet, processing and storing huge amounts of information. Our engineers have spent years perfecting Google’s data centers, making them 50 percent more energy efficient than the industry average. But we still need a lot of energy to process trillions of Google searches every year, play more than 400 hours of YouTube videos uploaded every minute, and power the products and services that our users depend on. That’s why we began purchasing renewable energy — to reduce our carbon footprint and address climate change. But it also makes business sense.

    Over the last six years, the cost of wind and solar came down 60 percent and 80 percent, respectively, proving that renewables are increasingly becoming the lowest cost option. Electricity costs are one of the largest components of our operating expenses at our data centers, and having a long-term stable cost of renewable power provides protection against price swings in energy.

    Our 20 renewable energy projects also help support communities, from Grady County, OK, to Rutherford County, NC, to the Atacama Region of Chile to municipalities in Sweden. To date, our purchasing commitments will result in infrastructure investments of more than $3.5 billion globally, about two-thirds of that in the United States. These projects also generate tens of millions of dollars per year in revenue to local property owners, and tens of millions more to local and national governments in tax revenue.

    So, we’re on track to match our global energy consumption on an annual basis by next year. But this is just the first step. As we look to the immediate future, we’ll continue to pursue these direct contracts as we grow, with an even greater focus on regional renewable energy purchases in places where we have data centers and significant operations. Since the wind doesn’t blow 24 hours a day, we’ll also broaden our purchases to a variety of energy sources that can enable renewable power, every hour of every day. Our ultimate goal is to create a world where everyone — not just Google — has access to clean energy. For more on these next steps, read our white paper.

    Operating our business in an environmentally sustainable way has been a core value from the beginning, and we’re always working on new ideas to make sustainability a reality — like enabling the building of healthy workplaces and creating a living, breathing dashboard for the planet. We’ve reported our carbon footprint and published information on our sustainability programs for many years in white papers, blog posts, and on our website. Now, we’ve put all this information together in a new Environmental Report.

    You can also check out our new environment website, where we share stories of how we are finding new ways to do more while using less. Most of our on-campus sustainability initiatives were started by a few passionate Googlers, and have now grown into company-wide efforts. From the solar panels on our roofs to our bike-to-work program, these initiatives sit at the heart of our company culture and help both us and our users reduce our impact on the environment.

    The science tells us that tackling climate change is an urgent global priority. We believe the private sector, in partnership with policy leaders, must take bold steps and that we can do so in a way that leads to growth and opportunity. And we have a responsibility to do so — to our users and the environment.

    We have lots of progress left to make, but these achievements we’re announcing today feel like a breath of fresh air. Now, back to work.

    Urs Hölzle
    Senior Vice President of Technical Infrastructure
    Google"

    March 11, 2019
    Zero-carbon power: 5 signs that a 100% clean power system is already in sight

    Nigel Topping, CEO of the We Mean Business coalition
    https://www.wemeanbusinesscoalition.org/blog/zero-carbon-power-ceraweek/

    Yeah, that's "Nvidia BS World" numbers that don't matter.

    ping time means something but not enough, take the measurements that Digital Foundry did to get a good realization of the game play effects - compared to PC / Xbox on the same game.

    It's likely to be optimal for some, playable for most, out of reach for those in poorly served network deployments - another good measure to get Rural Network Providers to deliver real service.

    I would imagine it'll take actually playing the games on each service, from various computers, laptops, Android devices - Apple will probably nix any such service access for iOS devices except their own - and see how it works.
     
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