Gaming Router

Discussion in 'Networking and Wireless' started by Geraldus Riviensis, Oct 19, 2017.

  1. Geraldus Riviensis

    Geraldus Riviensis Newbie

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    I am most sorry - I have done nothing so far on this website but ask questions. I have and am delighted with a gaming laptop, but rather crippled on steam by an appalling Scottish Highlands broadband speed -- 200 kilobytes per second. I wondered if this is as mother's router is several years old, and have heard of both gaming routers and router-modems.

    Are these devices such that they would plug into the laptop by USB and hopefully detect faster broadband, or need they be fastened to a telephone port?
     
  2. downloads

    downloads Super Moderator Super Moderator

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    First of all there is no such thing as a gaming router - packets are packets. Adding "gaming" to something like router serves one purpose only - to jack up the price.

    Secondly if you have a slow connection no amount of money spent on networking hardware is going to help. There is no "faster broadband" to be detected - you have a slow connection and that's it.

    It seems like your only option is to look for another ISP.
     
  3. kent1146

    kent1146 Notebook Prophet

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    You need a new ISP (internet service provider).

    You can't buy equipment to solve this. You could have the best networking gear in your house. But if your internet connection out of your house to the rest of the world is slow, then your internet experience will be slow. And the only way to fix that is to get a new ISP.
     
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  4. bloodhawk

    bloodhawk Derailer of threads.

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    THIS ^

    If you really have to get a new one, get something from Ubiquity Or Routerboard HAP series.

    I have been using this one - https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01BMMK4HI/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    for about 6 months now, performs way better than my ASUS RT68U.
     
  5. Vasudev

    Vasudev Notebook Prophet

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    Maybe 5GHz band will ensure lowest latency since not many devices comes with dual bands.
    Yes I agree you need to find new ISP, DSL or Optic Fiber is/are the best option with speeds greater than or equal to 10Mbps.
     
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  6. Commandor

    Commandor Notebook Consultant

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    First step would be checking with your ISP on the package you guys have and the speed you should be getting. Then you can go from there to determine if its on the front end or back end.
     
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  7. _sem_

    _sem_ Notebook Evangelist

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    Way better in what terms? I understand folks are mostly happy with the RT68U, although it isn't considered sth special these days.
     
  8. _sem_

    _sem_ Notebook Evangelist

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    I'm really curious what you had in mind, if you have time to comment, because I should get myself a new router these days. Range (tx power / rx sensitivity), reliability, throughput, performance with many clients, ????

    I understand the hAP AC is based on Qualcomm while the AC68U on Broadcom radios. That RouterOS is extremely flexible for experts but a puzzle to newcomers like myself (found when configuring a cAP lite). That it gets by fine for the basics despite the weaker CPU/RAM specs, and is great for making networks with several routers. But that the throughputs aren't the highest, and may go down if turning on some features that need the CPU like VPN.
    While the AC68U or AC86U should be able to produce higher local throughputs due to the newer generations of the radio standards and faster CPUs, for homes where a single device is enough, but are not as great for larger networks.

    https://mikrotik.com/product/RB962UiGS-5HacT2HnT
    https://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wir...86u-dual-band-ac2900-wireless-router-reviewed
     
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  9. bloodhawk

    bloodhawk Derailer of threads.

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    Connection stability, no drop outs, better range without the need for antennas, better settings, no need to restart the router every week etc.

    From my experience, Qualcomm radios have better compatibility and less connection issues with both Intel based and Broadcom / Qualcomm based Wifi adapters/cards. Every single Boardcomm based router, only seems to like working properly with select devices. In my and my friends cases, all of ASUS routers are picky between Apple / Android devices (they would work properly with 1 or the other properly , at a time) AND Intel / Killer (broadcomm?) based Wifi adapters in routers. For example, my AW has a Killer 1535 and has serious connection issues with ASUS routers, doesnt matter what specs. But works perfectly with Intel 8265/8260 Wifi cards.
    Specs will definitely come into play if you intend to actually use a lot of hardware intensive services. (like router based VPN ) But not many people in the $100 bracket actually do that.
    Also when people buy these $200+ routes, they think that these routers will magically make there signal and internet better, which is almost never the case.

    Also the routerboard devices are much more easier to setup in a multi access point home , than any ASUS / Netgear router i have tried, unless of course you flash DDWRT / Tomato on them.


    *Apologies for the super late reply, for some reason i never got a notification that you quoted me here.
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2017
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  10. _sem_

    _sem_ Notebook Evangelist

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    D-Link DIR-883
    Tnx for sharing the experience.

    I've noticed Netgear R7800 has the Qualcomm QCA9984 (4x4 MU-MIMO radio, even supporting 160MHz channels) which is relatively well regarded at SNB:
    https://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wir...x4s-smart-wifi-gaming-router-reviewed?start=3
    Actually the opinion over there is that MU-MIMO is still predominantly marketing vapourware and that this radio is almost the only one showing some advantage from it in some conditions, while generally one is much more likely to experience performance deterioration ;)
    The same radio is found in some other boxes like Zyxel NBG6817, Fritz!box 7590, 7580, Synology RT2600ac, D-Link DIR-883, TP-Link TL-WTR8600...

    Though actually I'm not sure if I really need this sort of specs, might be a GAS victim. My actual requirements are
    - decent overall performance and stability;
    - good 2.4MHz range to cover the back rooms a little bit better;
    - home VPN;
    - and parental controls with useful time restrictions.
    In this view, one suggestion was the Fritz!box 4040, based on 1-year old Qualcomm SoC IPQ4018 (2x2 radios plus a four-core 638MHz CPU in a small and sparsely packaged box wth no huge heatsinks inside), supposedly with quite stable and user friendly stock firmware (also supported by LEDE), even well regarded by some gamers
    https://www.techtesters.eu/avm-fritzbox-4040-review/
    https://www.pcwelt.de/produkte/AVM-Fritzbox-4040-WLAN-Router-Test-10059408.html

    The hap ac remains high on my list, but I'm afraid I's waste too much time configuring parental access schedules and overriding them when needed because this is not in Quickset ;(

    And regarding the range I'm getting the impression that the 2.4GHz reach of all new devices is relatively low mainly because of adhering to the EU tx power restriction... which is easily bypassed with Mikrotik and other pro gear or custom firmwares. I assume external antennas on consumer routers fall into the same (neighbour-unfriendly) category?
    https://frixtender.de/kompatibilitaet-der-fritzbox-4040/
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2017
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