FCC Chairman to unveil strategy to Reverse Net Neutrality

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by hmscott, Apr 26, 2017.

  1. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    FCC chairman expected to unveil strategy to reverse net neutrality
    By David Shepardson | WASHINGTON
    http://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-fcc-neutrality-idUSKBN17Q2CU

    "The head of the U.S. Federal Communications Commission is expected to unveil his strategy this week to overturn landmark 2015 net neutrality rules, a move that will kickoff a new battle over the future of the internet.

    Ajit Pai, who was named chair of the FCC by President Donald Trump in January, will deliver a speech titled "The Future of Internet Regulation" on Wednesday in Washington, the FCC said.

    Sources said Pai is expected to announce that he will begin the process of taking public comment to repeal the rules approved by the FCC under President Barack Obama in early 2015. The FCC could hold an initial vote on his proposal at the FCC's May 18 meeting, the sources said."

    "The Internet Association, a group representing Facebook Inc (FB.O), Amazon.com Inc (AMZN.O), Alphabet Inc (GOOGL.O) and others, met with Pai this month and said "the internet industry is uniform in its belief that net neutrality preserves the consumer experience, competition, and innovation online," according to a letter filed with the FCC."

    File your comments with the FCC here:


    Send Us Your Comments
    https://www.fcc.gov/general/send-us-your-comments

    "To file a comment of up to several paragraphs, click on one of the proceedings listed below. To file a longer comment as an attachment, click on submit a filing and include the docket number of the proceeding both on the form and on the attachment.

    If the proceeding you are looking for is not listed, you can go to ECFS and enter the proceeding number.

    NOTE: The filing you are making is a public filing. Any information that you submit will be available to the general public."
     
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  2. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    FCC Announces Plan to Abandon Net Neutrality and ISP Privacy
    APRIL 26, 2017 | BY KIT WALSH
    https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2017/04/fcc-announces-plan-abandon-net-neutrality-and-isp-privacy

    "Today, the chairman of the FCC announced his desire to abandon the agency’s net neutrality protections – which protect online competition, free speech, and privacy from interference by Internet service providers like Comcast and AT&T – by undermining the legal authority behind those protections.

    Rolling back the FCC’s Open Internet Order would mean losing the only rules that meaningfully prevent ISPs from taking advantage of their control over your Internet connection to shape your Internet experience and the market for services and devices that rely on that Internet connection. Since most Americans have only one option for broadband service, ISPs would have unchecked power to extract tolls from you and from businesses that wish to reach you. While the big incumbents like Facebook and Netflix might be able to pay those tolls, the next Facebook or Netflix would have a very hard time competing. Investors hesitate to fund startups that can be held for ransom by someone like an ISP. And the situation is even more dire for nonprofits like schools, libraries, educational sites, and political groups.

    Chairman Pai suggests these fears are unfounded, but we’ve seen ISPs use every method at their disposal to favor their own content over competitors, going up to and even over the lines drawn by the previous FCC. This is particularly concerning given that at least one major ISP, Verizon, ran a news service that banned content regarding mass surveillance and net neutrality itself as contrary to the company’s interests. In Canada, an ISP blocked access to a site being used by a labor union to organize against it. A decade of misguided FCC policymaking unfortunately helped create the dysfunctional ISP market; the Open Internet Order is our best hope for preventing ISPs from abusing their power to become private gatekeepers on speech.

    Today’s announcement cleverly pretends that the current “bright-line rules,” which clearly prohibit blocking and throttling, might survive. The law says otherwise. If Chairman Pai follows through on his intention to “reclassify” broadband service, it would be legally impossible for the FCC to enforce any such rules. How do we know this? Because the DC Circuit said so.

    The same is true for privacy. Pai suggested that the Federal Trade Commission could enforce privacy requirements, but this is an empty promise for two reasons. First, the FTC can only intervene if an ISP breaks a privacy promise, and ISP lawyers are very good at avoiding enforceable promises. Second, a federal appeals court has held that a company can’t be the subject of FTC action if any part of its offerings is a “common carrier,” like telephone service. So if your ISP also offers telephone service, the FTC can’t touch it. That’s the law right now on the west coast and it’s a regime that telecoms doubtless will continue to promote elsewhere.

    In short, Pai’s proposal leaves Internet users and small businesses completely at the mercy of ISPs. No one in the government would be able to step in to prevent abusive blocking and throttling of Internet content, pay-to-play fast lanes, or privacy violations by ISPs."
     
  3. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Kill net neutrality and you’ll kill us, say 800 US startups
    by James Vincent@jjvincent Apr 27, 2017, 4:28am EDT
    https://www.theverge.com/2017/4/27/...rality-roll-back-startups-letter-y-combinator

    "Yesterday, the Federal Communications Commission announced the first step in its plan to kill net neutrality — reversing the Title II classification of internet service providers. Doing so will remove many regulations placed on big cable companies, allowing them to erect barriers and tolls that impede the free movement of data around the internet.

    You won’t hear Comcast or Verizon complaining, of course — this benefits them. But young tech companies who need a level playing field on the internet to succeed are up in arms. After FCC chairman Ajit Pai made yesterday’s announcement, a group of more than 800 startups sent him a letter objecting to the plans.

    You can read the letter in full here, but the core argument is this:

    “The success of America’s startup ecosystem depends on more than improved broadband speeds. We also depend on an open Internet — including enforceable net neutrality rules that ensure big cable companies can’t discriminate against people like us. We’re deeply concerned with your intention to undo the existing legal framework.

    Without net neutrality, the incumbents who provide access to the Internet would be able to pick winners or losers in the market. They could impede traffic from our services in order to favor their own services or established competitors. Or they could impose new tolls on us, inhibiting consumer choice. [...] Our companies should be able to compete with incumbents on the quality of our products and services, not our capacity to pay tolls to Internet access providers.”

    Signatories to the letter include some recognizable names, like Y Combinator, Etsy, Foursquare, GitHub, Imgur, Nextdoor, and Warby Parker. But the majority of the companies involved will be unknowns to 99 percent of the population. Which is exactly the point.

    These aren’t established firms that will be able to sway government policy to their advantage (see: Netflix, which softened its support for net neutrality after becoming an established player in the industry), but companies who will have to fight an uphill battle against internet providers if Pai and the FCC get their way. They’re just trying not to get strangled in the crib."

    FCC's Pai on Plans to Roll Back Net Neutrality Rules
    Published on Apr 26, 2017
    FCC Chairman Ajit Pai discusses his plan to roll back net neutrality rules. He speaks with Bloomberg's Caroline Hyde on "Bloomberg Technology."

    Pai has "invented" so much "smoke" created to cover the facts and the simple straightforward ideas behind Net Neutrality.

    The interviewer hits hard with facts, and Pai puts out smoke and mirrors to deflect.

    Pai on one hand uses as example the benefits gained from the long running beneficial standard of Net Neutrality, then Pai immediately dismisses Net Neutrality as standing in the way of future innovation and infrastructure build out.

    Pai's created a completely made up fantasy that has no relation to the reality of the benefits we've all gained from Net Neutrality upon which all the Internet infrastructure build out has occurred.

    Pai leaves out completely that the reason for Killing Net Neutrality is so ISP's can charge customers, services, websites, etc more money than is being charged now.

    The big ISP's and carriers are raking in $Billions in profits quarterly.

    The Big ISP's and Carriers that are funding the attack on Net Neutraility don't need incentive to spend money on infrastructure. They already have that money.

    If the Big ISP's and Carriers aren't spending money on building out infrastructure now, they won't use any additional profits from squeezing customers and services for traffic tolls after killing Net Neutrality to build out infrastructure later.

    Pai's arguments against Net Neutrality can be summed up as fabricating "value" where none currently exists so "innovators" can generate more profits from exactly the same services customers are getting now, to "invest in and grow infrastructure".

    The only real effect of killing Net Neutrality is to separate millions of US Citizens from the Internet services they were already getting - with additional pay walls.
     
  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Net Neutrality II: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
    Published on May 7, 2017
    Equal access to online information is once again under serious threat. John Oliver encourages internet commenters to voice their displeasure to the FCC by visiting www.gofccyourself.com


    Will Net Neutrality be undone? (The 3:59, Ep. 223) - Starts at 1:40, was a Live show.


    FCC chair defends his net neutrality rollback
     
  5. katalin_2003

    katalin_2003 NBR Spectre Super Moderator

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  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    FCC should produce logs to prove ‘multiple DDoS attacks’ stopped net neutrality comments
    Fight for the Future says the FCC should produce its logs to prove its ‘multiple DDoS attacks’ claim that silenced net neutrality comments
    http://www.networkworld.com/article...-attacks-stopped-net-neutrality-comments.html

    "After John Oliver urged viewers of HBO’s Last Week Tonight to fight for net neutrality (again) and post comments on the FCC's site, people were not able to submit comments because the site turned to molasses.

    The FCC blamed the problem on “multiple” DDoS attacks: “These were deliberate attempts by external actors to bombard the FCC’s comment system with a high amount of traffic to our commercial cloud host. These actors were not attempting to file comments themselves; rather they made it difficult for legitimate commenters to access and file with the FCC.”

    A DDoS attack at the exact same time as Oliver’s viewers would have been leaving comments? Pfft.

    The last rally cry by Oliver resulted in such a flood of would-be commenters that it crashed the FCC comments site. So, it doesn’t seem outside the realm of possibilities that his newest plea for every internet group to come together and tell the FCC to preserve net neutrality and Title II could also crash the site.
    In fact, Fight for the Future is highly skeptical of the FCC’s excuse and wants answers, saying the FCC should back up its DDoS attack claims with proof. It’s really quite simple, the FCC should release its logs.

    The Art of War? Sun Tzu said, “To secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself.”

    I agree with Fight for the Future; the FCC should produce its logs and prove its multiple DDoS claim. It will either be true or another bizarre claim in a series of inexplicable claims—some might can them lies—made by Pai. If the truth is continually being twisted and presented as facts, then it might encourage people who would not normally comment in support of net neutrality to do so. Right now, there are under 350,000 comments filed, which is a long way from the 4 million last time. (now 555,972 results)
    If you'd like to submit a comment, use Oliver's simplified URL—gofccyourself.com—and click Express.

    FCC should produce logs to prove ‘multiple DDoS attacks’ stopped net neutrality comments (networkworld.com)
    https://www.reddit.com/r/technology/comments/6a632m/fcc_should_produce_logs_to_prove_multiple_ddos/
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2017
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Bot-generated comments swamp FCC, urging overturn of net neutrality
    http://www.networkworld.com/article...mp-fcc-urging-overturn-of-net-neutrality.html

    "Some supporters of a U.S. Federal Communications Commission plan to repeal its recent net neutrality rules have apparently resorted to dirty tricks.

    An apparent bot-generated campaign has posted more than 83,400 comments on the FCC's website supporting the agency's plan to gut its own net neutrality rules.

    A handful of people whose names are on the bot-generated comments have denied making the comments, according to a report by ZDNet. The 83,400 comments, filed to the FCC's comment system between Monday and Wednesday, all contain the same text, reading in part:

    "The unprecedented regulatory power the Obama Administration imposed on the internet is smothering innovation, damaging the American economy and obstructing job creation. I urge the Federal Communications Commission to end the bureaucratic regulatory overreach of the internet ... and restore the bipartisan light-touch regulatory consensus that enabled the internet to flourish for more than 20 years."

    That argument echoes the criticism by broadband providers, conservative groups, and many Republicans about the FCC's 2015 net neutrality rules.

    An FCC spokesman declined to talk about the apparent bot attack. "We’re not commenting on the comments at this time," he said by email.

    The FCC has received more than 730,000 public comments on Chairman Ajit Pai's proposal to roll back the 2-year-old rules, which classified broadband as a regulated telecom-like service and prohibited providers from selectively blocking or slowing web traffic. These identical comments represent more than 11 percent of the total."
     
  8. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    fo24lOP.jpg
    FCC chairman voted to sell your browsing history — so we asked to see his

    By Zack Whittaker for Zero Day | May 12, 2017 | Topic: Security
    Thanks to the FCC chairman, internet providers can now sell Americans' browsing histories for targeted advertising. We thought it was only fair to see his — so, we filed a Freedom of Information request.

    "NEW YORK -- The Federal Communications Commission has refused to turn over the internet browsing history of its chairman Ajit Pai, weeks after he rolled back rules that prevented internet providers from selling the browsing histories of millions of Americans.

    In a response to a request filed by ZDNet under the Freedom of Information Act, the agency said Friday that it had "no responsive documents" to our request.

    The agency cited a similar decision filed with Homeland Security that found that the law doesn't require a government agency to create a record in response to a request.

    Specifically, we asked for the "web browsing history of all web and mobile browsers used by Ajit Pai on any government network or account," from the date that the rules were formally revoked by Congress in late March.

    The response from the FCC said: "Here, the agency does not have a record that reflects the Chairman's web browsing history."

    In other words, Pai voted to allow internet providers to turn over your browsing history, but won't let anyone see his.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2017
  9. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Update from John Oliver... https://gofccyourself.com see message below, and a new video update here:

    Net Neutrality Update: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (Web Exclusive)


    gofccyourselfdotcom.JPG
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2017
  10. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    The "FCC Procedural Quirk" mentioned at the https://gofccyourself.com page that leads to the FCC Comments forms says the FCC officials can't be given presentations from the public for a "Sunshine Period" starting May 12th before the next meeting, which is May 18th.

    Why can't they - the FCC officials - just not *look* at submissions submitted by the public after that "Sunshine Period" starts? The computer doesn't care, the database can take the comments from the public to be read later.

    Here is the (pdf) public notice from the FCC:
    http://transition.fcc.gov/Daily_Releases/Daily_Business/2017/db0511/DA-17-454A1.pdf
    PUBLIC NOTICE Federal Communications Commission
    445 12th St., S.W. Washington, D.C. 20554
    News Media Information 202 / 418-0500
    Internet: http://www.fcc.gov
    TTY: 1-888-835-5322
    DA 17-454
    Released: May 11, 2017 GUIDANCE ON THE FCC’S SUNSHINE PERIOD IN THE RESTORING INTERNET FREEDOM PROCEEDING WC Docket No. 17-108

    Today, the Federal Communications Commission released its Agenda for the Commission’s May 18, 2017 Open Meeting. The Agenda identifies the items that the Commission intends to vote on during that meeting.

    The Restoring Internet Freedom Notice of Proposed Rulemaking is included in the list of items to be considered. The FCC has long-standing rules that apply to all presentations (including comments, filings, and other submissions) that concern any item that has been listed on the Agenda. Given the significant public interest in this item, this Public Notice both reminds the public of those rules and highlights the opportunities that the public will have to continue its participation in this important proceeding.

    Under the Commission’s long-standing rules that apply to all proceedings, all presentations to Commission “decision-makers” that concern a matter listed on the Agenda are prohibited during what is known as the Sunshine Agenda period.1 This means that during this brief period of time, members of the public cannot make presentations to FCC employees who are working on the matter, and are likely to be involved in making a decision on it, if the underlying content of the communication concerns the outcome of the proceeding. Thus, for example, during this brief period of time, the Commission’s rules generally prohibit members of the public from submitting comments through the Commission’s website addressing the merits of the Restoring Internet Freedom Notice of Proposed Rulemaking or any other item to be considered at the May 18 meeting. The Commission adopted these rules to provide FCC decision-makers with a period of repose during which they can reflect on the upcoming items.

    The Sunshine Agenda period for the Restoring Internet Freedom Notice of Proposed Rulemaking will begin on May 12, 2017, and will continue until the Commission releases the text of the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking or removes it from the meeting agenda. Presentations, including comments, that are received during the Sunshine Agenda period and do not meet an exception to the Commission’s rules will be marked in the Commission’s Electronic Comment Filing System (ECFS) as “SUNSHINE.” These presentations will be associated with, but not made a part of, the record in the proceeding.

    Presentations made by the public after the end of the Sunshine Agenda period will be made a part of the record of the proceeding. 1 47 CFR § 1.1203. 2

    The Commission encourages robust participation from interested members of the public in all of its proceedings. If the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking is adopted at the Commission’s May 18 meeting, the formal comment period will begin when that document is released. Members of the public are encouraged during that period to file their comments regarding this matter in ECFS to be considered as part of the formal rulemaking record. For assistance with using ECFS, please contact the ECFS Help Desk via email at ECFSHelp@fcc.gov or at 202-418-0193. See also Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau Guidance on Filing Comments in the Restoring Internet Freedom Proceeding, WC Docket No. 17-108, Public Notice (CGB Apr. 27, 2017).

    ACCESSIBLE FORMATS: To request materials in accessible formats for people with disabilities (Braille, large print, electronic files, audio format), send an e-mail to fcc504@fcc.gov or call the Consumer and Governmental Affairs Bureau at 202-418-0530 (voice) or 202-418-0432 (TTY). -FCC-
     
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