Fake 330w Power Adapter or just poor quality??

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by MKazmer, Dec 8, 2017.

  1. MKazmer

    MKazmer Notebook Consultant

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    Here's my GPUz info for this GPU, I also ran 3DMark11 again with the 230w since I didn't try it since the Gelid repaste and it's higher than before. It's not 14,000+ as I feel it should be, but it seems to be within normal working range. It also shows only 43% TDP, but I don't think this helps solve this issue. I think I'm going to just return the power supply since it seems to be the issue. If anyone knows of a legit source for a bigger power supply at a reasonable price, please PM me.

    Thank you

    980m gsync GPU-z.PNG

    Screenshot (34).png
     
  2. MKazmer

    MKazmer Notebook Consultant

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    I posted before seeing your response. I sent you a PM asking where I could find more info on adding the 3 FETs. I'd like to do this mod.
     
  3. yrekabakery

    yrekabakery Notebook Evangelist

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    I just replied to your PM.

    A 980M at stock does not score 14K in 3DM11 graphics. Not sure why you feel it should.
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2017
  4. MKazmer

    MKazmer Notebook Consultant

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    I thought I remembered my p150sm-a getting a 14k graphic score, but I must be remembering wrong. Thank you again.
     
  5. Khenglish

    Khenglish Notebook Evangelist

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    When checking your result for the 330W PSU it looks like vsync is on, or something is preventing fps from exceeding 60. Your graphics test 3 is exactly 59.9 fps, while test 3 on the 230w is 80 fps. The 330w PSU actually had a better result for test 4, which a 980m cannot hit 60 fps on.

    So check if you can exceed 60 fps on the 330w psu.
     
  6. Darker01

    Darker01 Notebook Geek

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    I did just that recently here. It was a painful process for since it was my first time doing it, and I did it because I have a lot more to gain in adding the FETs than I stand losing (read: card was dead but otherwise fixable). I wouldn't recommend doing this mod unless you know you are somewhat competent in electronics (and have $$$ to spare).Total material cost for me was around $100-150 range (W.E.P. 858D hot air reflow station, HAKKO 936 soldering iron, legit AMTECH flux, CSD87350Q5D MOSFET, wick, solder...), but I think you could get away with cheaper flux, a less expensive soldering iron, free TI samples for .edu email addresses.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2017
  7. MKazmer

    MKazmer Notebook Consultant

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    Khenglish,
    I appreciate your observations, however, I didn't change settings between testing the two adapters so I don't understand how this could have happened. Is it possible that my laptop is recognizing the 330w adapter and reduced performance settings somehow as a result? I will take screenshots of NVIDIA control panel settings between the two adapters and compare to see if they change.

    Perhaps it's just a chip incompatibility issue, but I still feel like the slow down is an issue with the 330w.

    Darker,
    Considering the performance increase I have seen with the FET mod, it's worth it to me. I want to use my setup for VR and don't feel like paying $700 for a 1060 or 1070. As far as skills needed, I will practice on something else first. Also, I use to solder small SMD components when I made infrared receivers and transmitters. I'm familiar with the importance of good flux and cleanliness. Lack of it was the major cause early difficulties I had when soldering and I learned how it makes all the difference.

    As far as the brand of hot air work station is concerned, what do you think of using a cheaper one like a Zeny or Yaogong? I don't want to go too cheap, but I don't want to pay for more than I need since I probably won't use it much after this.

    As far as technique, do you have any advice to offer?

    Thank you again to all!
     
  8. Khenglish

    Khenglish Notebook Evangelist

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    The added FETs only help performance if you overvolt. If you don't raise the voltage, then they don't help you.
     
  9. MKazmer

    MKazmer Notebook Consultant

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    Thank you for that bit of info Khenglish, I will overvolt a little at a time until I get to the highest stable voltage and then back it off a little for reliability purposes. I just ordered some Thermal Grizzly since the Gelid seemed to help a little. Even if it only lowers temps a few degrees it will help. One thing I'd like to add is that the Gelid GP-Extreme thermal pads seemed to make a difference in my score as well. I wonder what a CPU delid will do, but I'm getting a little off topic so I will stop there.
     
  10. Darker01

    Darker01 Notebook Geek

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    I believe any functional 858D will do the job, but the catch is that it has to be functional. The W.E.P. 858D is unremarkable and using it carries an inherent risk of burning down your house like any of the other 858D clones made with chinesium, but I know for a fact that the unit I have wasn't haphazardly designed or assembled. I popped open the main housing + the heating element housing to check for how the fuse is wired, is the metal chassis/heat gun metal shroud grounded, and is there anything loose inside. My unit had a broken piece of plastic inside the heating element housing, but it was otherwise functional and safe enough for me to use. Amazon at time of writing has both the Zeny and Yaogong 858D for about $10 cheaper than what I paid for mine. Get one, check it, and exchange until satisfied.

    1st pic shows my setup. I had the HAKKO 936 set at around 300*C and used chisel tip. The W.E.P. hot air rework station was set at 400 on the display, blow speed was set to maximum, and nozzle was the round type that came with the station (9 mm diameter I think). Note that I placed the card on a ceramic tile, followed by a piece of cardboard, and finally the cutting mat. The cardboard is there to insulate the tile from the plastic cutting mat, and the cutting mat is there to protect the glass table. The row of FETs is at the end of the PCB, so some of the hot air will heat up whatever the card is on.

    Watch this to see how the MOSFET is removed and replaced. Louis Rossmann's content in general deals with hot air and iron soldering on circuit boards. I watched a lot of his stuffs for a couple of months before I started fixing my GTX 980M. His technique is on point and should be followed as closely as possible. I find it helpful that the lead-free solder on the PCB be replaced with leaded solder since the latter melts at a lower temperature. Be extra careful with the amount of solder you deposited on the pads (especially the ground pad) though as excess solder may cause the pins to bridge or the MOSFET not flat.

    Right, after depositing flux and placing the MOSFET as closely aligned as possible (make damn sure Pin 1 location is correct), I started heating the area of the MOSFET itself with the tip being about 1-2 inch above the MOSFET. Since you are adding new MOSFETs, be extra careful with the existing MOSFETs nearby. I find that after the solder at the new MOSFET melted, the solder at the surrounding MOSFETs will easily melt as well. Once you see the MOSFET moves slightly, use the tweezer to press it down for good contact. Inspect the new MOSFET to see that it's both flat, and its pins are all aligned. Check the 2 large pads on the connector for a possible short to ground. Repeat till all MOSFETs are added. I used the hot air station set at the lowest temperate possible to dry the board after I cleaned the flux off with 90% IPA. Excess flux tended to get stuck in the space among the chokes and the caps. I'm pretty sure there's leftover flux at those spots on my card, but I don't think it can kill the card in the short term.

    More MOSFETs may not make the card work any better. I'm not sure if the Clevo service center accept the card once you messed with it or not, but I highly doubt that they do.
     
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