External HDD unable to show on my computer

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Peter Griffin, Aug 22, 2020.

  1. Peter Griffin

    Peter Griffin Notebook Guru

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    Well! According to the customer care centre that Seagate has one and only recovery lab in Netherlands and it takes 500-2000$ to recover data and it's for free since I am a loyal customer. Though custom duty will take upto 80$ (I bought HDD for around 75$)

    In case if I try to recover by myself you need to say that I need to open and take out drive and connect it in a desktop with SATA cable to motherboard. In case if it is still not able to detect?
    As per my google search the problem I get in my HDD is primary sector of my drive got corrupted or broken due to which it is not able to detect. I just need to fix the primary sector without formatting it.
    Whenever I open disk management it asks to initialize I don't do that because I think if I do that HDD will format and I will lose my data. What is the best solution for that?
     
  2. Peter Griffin

    Peter Griffin Notebook Guru

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    Well If you know about my case the HDD I plugged suddenly not detecting. As per my google search the problem I get in my HDD is primary sector of my drive got corrupted or broken due to which it is not able to detect. I just need to fix the primary sector without formatting the drive. Do you still recommend me to open the drive and plug it in a desktop with SATA cable? I think it won't able to detect there as well. I changed my HDD cable and problem is same. So things will be different after opening enclosure and connecting through SATA cable to a desktop?
     
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  3. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    @Peter Griffin, I am not recommending any course of action on your behalf. What I have done is to give you your options (as I knew at the time). The final decision and course of action are yours.

    I did learn something from you too (Seagate's drive recovery service for 'loyal customers'). Not that I would ever take advantage of anything like that for the reasons already mentioned.

    A google search about the issue may, or may not, be the actual issue in your case. I wouldn't put too much weight on that google 'solution', but it may have been one avenue I went down to recover my data if needed.

    At this point, it is your call. Which way are you going to proceed? Let us know.

    But try to have more than a single copy of your data on more than a single model of external HDD's, and ideally in multiple locations too.

    Relying on warranties and recovery services isn't my idea of having my data safe, reliable, accessible, and secure at all.
     
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  4. Starlight5

    Starlight5 Don't call me Chris, my name is Elvis

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    @Peter Griffin it's hard to tell what exactly happened to the drive. Post a CrystalDiskInfo screenshot and we'll go from there.

    Regarding USB vs SATA - I had weird bugs with those. Particularly I had a problem where a Seagate USB drive suddenly stopped working, but sadly I don't remember whether it was the exact same problem as yours - i.e. wrong capacity reported & data inaccessible - or completely undetected by the system. Regardless, putting the drive in a different enclosure with additional power resolved the issue, after that the drive was returned to its regular enclosure and is working to this day. Not that I recommend doing that right away.

    With drives, regardless what it looks like you start by looking at its SMART data. It's a fast and easy way to check if the drive has suffered an obvious hardware failure or not.

    I'd recommend testdisk for data recovery but that needs a separate drive with enough free space and, while a great piece of software, is not exactly user-friendly. Basically you want to recover the data before attempting to fix anything, if you really value it.

    Of course, opinions on the subject may wary. If someone else suggests an easy fix and it'll work right away - great! But you definitely need to start by looking at drive's SMART data, before attempting to do anything.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2020
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  5. Aivxtla

    Aivxtla Notebook Evangelist

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    Try connecting the drive directly to a Desktop, at least let you know if it's the enclosure bridge or the actual drive having the issue, if SMART data isn't showing anything alarming.. There are recovery softwares, I used many years back for one of my failed WDs that helped but often those can be quite expensive and only help in certain types of failures, obviuosly if it won't spin or the head is damaged you may need to take/ship it to a repair facility, where they maybe able to get data off the platters.

    For consumer drives Hitachi (HGST) and Toshiba are probably the most reliable, HGST is now a division of WD. HGST also happens to be IBMs old hard drive division that was sold to Hitachi, where one of my uncle's worked before the sale. My current NAS drives are Toshibas.

    As for failure rates WD and Seagate have flipped back and forth before and also depending on which model looking at some of Backblaze's previous annualized failures, but if I recall right now WD is better.

    Ironically like 15-16 years ago the roles were reversed between Seagate and WD, I literally had 3-4 WD drives fail in a span of less than a year (after only a few months of use) each being a replacement for the other different size models, I absolutely hated WD at the time at least the consumer drives. That last replacement 120GB drive failed I think after 2 years after those. However I will admit they had an excellent crosshipping replacement service and support was overall excellent and responsive. Seagate used to be good a while back. However when my dad was consulting via a firm at Seagate over a decade ago he told me at the time IBM consultants told Segate to cut down on backend testing to save costs assuming despite the increase in failures/returns the cost savings would be worth it.

    Also always keep two backups, just because a drive is reliable doesn't mean you won't get the occasional dud (Always assume you could be in that 1-2%) or silent data corruption or early drive failure.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2020
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  6. Peter Griffin

    Peter Griffin Notebook Guru

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    I installed crystaldisk info and it is just showing my primary SSD on which my laptop is running windows 10. It was unable to detect the external HDD, although it is running smoothly with light and vibrations like a normal mechanical disk. It is able to detect on device manager.
    Also I changed to USB cable to amazon basic USB disk cable, the problem is still the same.
    I installed testdisk and it has been 1 hour it's scanning rear error. Scanning 1.17 billion cylinders will take days to analyse.
    The last option is to remove the casing of the disk and plug it on desktop but currently I am not preferring to go outside as I don't have any desktop now in my home and office.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2020
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  7. Tech Junky

    Tech Junky Notebook Consultant

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    In the past I've used TestDisk to make forensic copies of drives that ""fail"". The data is there and the low level nature of TD pulls that info from the platters w/o altering it in anyway. It does take hours if it's even a small 300GB drive but I've recovered even the hardest to get files from a completely corrupted drive that after recovering the data wouldn't boot or format no matter what method was attempted to reconfigure things on the drive to make it function again.

    Personally I just remove the drive whether 2.5 / 3.5 and hook it up to a USB <> Sata cable like USB31C2SAT3

    As to moving forward.... I wouldn't go with a prepackaged drive you can find in stores like best buy.... these drives tend to be "enterprise" rejects and they throw a controller board on them and plastic cases to be consumer friendly.

    Pick a decent drive like WD Red and an enclosure to make your own for slightly more $ but A LOT more confidence in your data integrity. If you're looking at a small 100GB-256GB in files then look into a series of flash/ssd drives to make multiple copies in case one fails you'll have an actual backup through another vendor.

    I picked up a SanDisk pro recently 256GB for ~$60 that performs at Sata SSD speeds

    For an alternate brand my 2nd / 3rd choices would have been PNY Pro Elite more of an NVME speed 900MB/s ~$60 for 256GB 3rd would be Arcanite which is going to be slower than the SD above but if you're not moving huge amounts of data consistently it's a decent drive. Tied for 3rd though would be Corsair GTX.

    I tend to back up to my server which is running RAID 10 ( 4 disks / 2 pair / 1 mirror of each pair), my laptop is running dual NVME drives ( OS / Storage), I have an NVME in an enclosure for portability / backup.
     
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