External HDD unable to show on my computer

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Peter Griffin, Aug 22, 2020.

  1. Peter Griffin

    Peter Griffin Notebook Guru

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    Hello! I have a one year old 2TB Seagate Backup Plus HDD. Suddenly I plugged in and it is not showing in my computer. I checked the device manager it is showing plugged in. I checked the disk management and got shocked as it is asking for initalize and capacity is 49000 TB. I checked again in different windows notebook it is showing the same. Even in linux it is not detecting.
    I have 1.2 TB of precious data in that.. I don't know how the hell this happened?, I take care of it like a baby, keep it in hard disk pouch, never dropped.
    I tried recovery software provided by seagate but it is not able to analyze the data, not a single file.
    I googled and found it may be because of corruption in the primary sector. I am not sure though.
    What should I do? My valuable personal data is in that?
     
  2. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    Sorry to hear about those troubles with the Seagate. But a single drive, let alone the notorious Seagates which I don't trust for a single text file, isn't a backup either of anything either as you have so painfully found out.

    How important is the data to you? You may have to pay to get it recovered. With 1.2 TB of data on it, I hope you have deep pockets, or, someone can offer you a process that will work.
     
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  3. Peter Griffin

    Peter Griffin Notebook Guru

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    If not seagate what brand you trust? At least 100GB of photos are precious memories. Songs, shows and movies could be downloaded again. How can I recover back again? Idk anything to get it back.
     
  4. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    Hitachi/WD (almost exclusively). Nothing else goes into any of the systems/workstations/NAS' I own or manage.

    Have a look at how 'recovery companies' would do it: they will replace parts of the drive as needed until they can see the data again.

    On the other end, you may get what you need via a software solution. I am not endorsing this product, but a very quick search makes it look promising.

    See:
    https://www.r-studio.com/?YAHNA600

    I can't stress enough that once you have your data back (and in any case, do it with the data you do have now...) have your data safely copied from the original source to two or more markedly different (more, always more...) devices, locations, methods, etc.

    A single copy of your data on a 'backup device' isn't a backup. Neither are multiple copies of your data that are stored in the same physical location. Or, neither when multiple copies exist but are using the same backup method (whether that is a single online service (with their 'duplicated' servers), the same model external drive, times 'x' times, or when your data is specialized and needs certain hardware/software/dongles to access it (or worse: data on an Apple service/device).

    For hardware you control, don't have the backup device always plugged in and connected. And don't have it being doing 'Auto' backups either. Have two or more external devices that you rotate on a set schedule and ideally, have at least one in a remote location at all times.

    BTW, this is the exact reason why I don't ever purchase an extended warranty/protection for any storage medium. There are no warranties that guarantee the DATA, only the drives. Furthermore, once my DATA or my clients' DATA is written to any storage medium, the drive doesn't physically leave my control for any reason. Except by hammer once it dies or I stop needing to use it. This goes for both HDD's and SSD's too. (Yeah; I don't trust recovery companies either).

    The idea here is simple. It's our data. We need to ensure we keep it safe. After all, there is nobody out there that cares more for it than we do.
     
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  5. Peter Griffin

    Peter Griffin Notebook Guru

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    I downloaded the full version of R Studio Recovery. I tried scan for an 1 hour and stopped. Not a single file is able to recover with this software. Should I let scan for many hours?
     
  6. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    At this stage, I would be tempted to remove the drive from the external enclosure its in and try recovering from it from a desktop system.

    I don't think an hour is long enough for anything to happen. I would try at least overnight if not a full 24 hours or more (after you have it out of the enclosure).
     
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  7. Jdpurvis

    Jdpurvis Notebook Evangelist

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    I would tend to agree with removing it from the enclosure and trying to access it from a desktop system. You could get lucky - though disk failure is more likely, you could have a dead interface card.
    Good luck.
     
  8. Peter Griffin

    Peter Griffin Notebook Guru

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    Now the situation is I called seagate and they said you need to send it to us and they have some lab in Netherlands as my HDD is under warranty. They will recover data within 60 days and send it back to my country. Everything is free but the foreign duty taxes will take place by my govt. and that will cost upto the price of my HDD. Also they will provide me a new HDD with that old recovered.
    Should I open the drive enclosure and do it myself? Will that void the warranty?
     
  9. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    How much do you trust some unknown workers in the Netherlands with your DATA? If all you have are pictures and videos from cell phones of you and your friends and family that some kind of versions are already floating around in cyberspace, it may be worth considering. If you have anything more sensitive, I would take it apart myself and take my chances.

    Either way, I am surprised that the data would take 60 days to be recovered (I mean, at all). Warranty will definitely be void.

    I would not leave that drive 'out there' for 60 days. But, maybe I'm not as trusting as you may be.

    Be warned though that even though you will void the warranty by opening up the enclosure, you may still not be easily able to connect it to any computer. In their infinite wisdom, external drive manufacturers now regularly castrate the SATA/POWER connectors too.
     
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  10. Starlight5

    Starlight5 Don't call me Chris, my name is Elvis

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    @Peter Griffin check the drive's SMART with CrystalDiskInfo or something like that, post screenshot.
    Depending on what SMART says, but generally yes you should if you care about your data.

    USB to SATA bridges are generally less reliable than drives, and on most Seagate drives the bridges are replaceable, not soldered onto the drive.

    Check with a different cable before opening, even USB2.0 micro b will do as long as known good.
    Technically yes.
    A friend of mine opened her drive enclosure in similar situation before sending it for warranty replacement. She was careful and never told them, and Seagate replaced the drive.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2020
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