Enabling 3 finger tap middle click and other functions on Elan touchpads (Zenbooks, etc.)

Discussion in 'Asus' started by bitsoffish, Aug 18, 2012.

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  1. jwdink

    jwdink Notebook Guru

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    Has anyone figured out registry settings to change the touch sensitivity for JUST tap to click? I'm finding that either tap to click is too sensitive, or multi-finger swipes are not sensitive enough.
     
  2. jwdink

    jwdink Notebook Guru

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    Or, put another way--

    Is anyone happy with how tap to click works on their device? If so, could you share which drivers you're using and/or registry settings?
     
  3. Nemar

    Nemar Newbie

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    Hello , i just bought a Lenovo Ideapad t510p....it's amazing but i hate the touchpad...its ELAN and it wont let me modify the touchpad area...the buttons are integrated in the touchpad and it makes it very hard for me to click them without moving the cursor...i tried reducing sensivity but its not enough...can i reduche the touchpad ara through the registry? i tried doing it by the driver's options but it doesnt show up...
    i went into the registry ediotr and i found some files regarding a Smartarea...could it be that?
    one of them is SmartArea_Enable... i changed the number from 0 to 1 , but still it doesnt show up in the driver options...maybe i have to modify the other files from the registry? like SmartArea_Left_Range , SmartArea_Down_Range ecc ecc...should i modify these?
    I also found other ones like PST_StartZone_Top or PST_Startzone_Bottom...i couldnt find any clue on the internet...
    any idea?
     
  4. fashionablyDRAB

    fashionablyDRAB Newbie

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    Just wanted to add on to this because it's the first link that comes up on Google. The original post didn't have the desired effects for me (the "3-finger press" mentioned is intended to launch a specific application and there were no drop-down menus that appeared in the ElanTech driver configuration after installing the different drivers and modding the registries).

    Instead of uninstalling Asus' smart gestures and installing the "vanilla" Elantech drivers (which also requires uninstalling Asus' ATK Package which will consequently disable some of your function keys, USB charger, and may also have other ill-advised effects) there is a very simple fix to get a 3-finger tap to act as a "middle click". I found the solution here, btw, 3 finger middle click (not 3 middle fingers) | mikemurko

    Open up Regedit and go to the same place as the original post mentions: HKEY_Current_User\Software\Elantech\SmartPad
    This time, however, simply change the value "Tap_Three_Finger" to "2" (mine was also set to "7" by default)
    --edit--
    Forgot to mention that you have to restart your computer after editing the registry!
     
  5. mapki

    mapki Newbie

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    I found another solution - Samsung Elan driver. IMHO it is perfect - customizable via GUI, no need for reg tweaks. Works flawlessly. Link - https://yadi.sk/d/OjhS4tMXZYSmz
     
  6. Ray890

    Ray890 Newbie

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    Hey there, I have a Sager NP4658 (Clevo W650SF) laptop with an Elan touchpad, and I was just using an Acer V3-571 laptop (also has ELan) on backup for a few weeks while I waited for my main laptop to get repaired. With the Acer laptop, I found and enabled an option to do a 2-finger tap to middle click through the ELan control panel and found it extremely useful. Well, my main laptop came back, and I found that the ELan control panel on my Sager is missing a lot of options, including the ability to two-finger tap.

    First off, I tried downloading the ELan driver from the Acer V3-571 driver download page, and noticed that only resulted in "Touchpad not detected", so I had to revert back to the driver from Sager to get the touchpad enhancements working. So then I discovered this thread, which looks very promising. The problem is, I apply these registry mods, nothing happens. When I reboot, the registry settings had been reverted back to the state before I did the changes.

    Can anyone help me?

    Registry tweaks attempted:
    1. HKCU\Software\Elantech\SmartPad
    2. Tap_Two_Finger_Enable from 0 to 1
    3. Tap_Two_Finger from 7 to 2
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2015
  7. MickeyC13

    MickeyC13 Newbie

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    Anybody know what the registry key is for two-finger swipes acting as your browser back/forward buttons? I got used to having that in Windows 7, and now that I've upgraded to 10 finally, I lost a lot of that stuff with the latest ELAN drivers. Registry edits have gotten everything else back, but nothing I've tried has worked so far with two-finger swipes. Alternatively, anybody know what version of the drivers I'd need to roll back to in order to get it?
     
  8. rfii

    rfii Notebook Consultant

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    Will this work on a asus ux303LN
     
  9. nipsen

    nipsen Notebook Ditty

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    Kind of late, but turns out that there does in fact exists a semi-official asus-packaged ELAN driver that identifies the touchpad correctly, and works with various registry settings, allows multitouch clicks, etc. It does not have a control panel, but the default package does not come with broken resource-draining "helper" functions, and does not add the direct calls to acpi that increases cpu speed for no reason, screws over practically every other acpi-type function running on the computer, or prevent wakes and other various control functions from working.

    Basically, any asus laptop can install this, also on Win10, and see instant improvement on smoother scroll as well as battery life and stability in general. It's essentially the core ELAN driver without the "supersmartgesture" stuff running on top of it.

    http://www.asus.com/support/Download/3/589/0/21/41/
     
  10. nipsen

    nipsen Notebook Ditty

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    Just wanted to bump this as a PSA of sorts, since a windows update a few weeks ago actually would do a silent uninstall of the mentioned elantech driver. And then somehow also fail to install Asus' now presumably submitted new driver properly, or identify the touchpad with the specific keyed ID in the asus branding.

    If people are not familiar with this entire story about the unbridled brilliance of Asus' support folks. Then the short version is that you cannot install a generic elantech driver on any of the asus touchpads, since this driver lacks the magic Microsaft certificate needed to identify the OEM-specific IDs used in the acpi-calls (read: a specific but not implicitly known address. The address is contained in the MS database. So that you essentially cannot install a driver other than the one your vendor pays MS to certify. Because reasons).

    This ID isn't magical or unknown or encrypted or anything, so as long as this driver knows the address, there's no problem. But it has to be "signed"(read: the inf-files need to identify the touchpad - similar process and toolchain solution as the other hotkey-related tools). And you can't simply override this signing process or replace the driver's ID and address (at least since Win8). So they've effectively created a way to "protect" the entirely generic touchpad hardware from being used with entirely generic touchpad software.

    Which likely wouldn't have given a single customer a second thought normally. But the only "officially" available touchpad driver Asus has is the one that comes with their "SmartGesture" software.

    Just to describe how dumb this is: This isn't actually the program that provides the functionality, this comes from the Elantech touchpad package. Which has several other functions in addition to the ones made available in the Smartigestures. On top of this, the Smartgesture package also silently sets a number of options in the driver that you cannot change. This is things like sensitivity and acceleration settings, timeout for disabling the driver when you type, etc., etc.

    The worst part here is something else, however. Once you install the standard touchpad driver, every single Asus customer, on every single computer, model and brand variant Asus has ever made. You will notice something curious.

    And it is that the processor state is locked at the highest possible frequency when this driver is installed. Somehow the battery is drained on battery-mode, with forced downclocks, no matter what you do. When this driver is installed.

    I couldn't figure it out, until I started decompiling the SMARTIGESTURE software, and found out that the helper functions in this software is actually constantly polling the acpi-functions to peak the processor state.

    I thought there had to be some sort of mistake: why in the ampersand-slash-semicolon-numberdash would a touchpad driver bump the processor? Why would a software package like that even have these functions? Why would a vendor hotspike acpi-calls like this that supercede the intel package? Why would they possibly risk all the conflicts and problems that this specific process creates during and after wake-ups? After all, 100% of the "stuff happens after wake-up" on asus laptops comes from, you guessed it, wrong nesting of acpi-calls. It's a well-known problem that engages support in very likely a huge amount of cases, so why would this be there?

    I look at this, and I frown a bit. So I write asus support, and wait three weeks. And there's actually a response (that's been posted here in full on the forum elsewhere). Where a helpful but very annoyed support-person points out that this - forcing the processor to increase - is a function that is meant to be there.

    I ask why, for goodness sakes, why is this there? And the guy explains in a roundabout fashion that support has been contacted, and reviews have mentioned, that the asus scrolling is not as "smooth" as the scroll in for example a Mac.

    And the solution they came up with was to hotspike the processor at the instance of a scroll-event. To make sure that once the scrolling has begun, the processor is peaking out at max processor speed. Because maxing the processor somehow increases the rate at which the mouse-scroll is updated.

    I explain that.. since .. 1997 or so.. this has not been how interrupts on a bus is handled. And that since the WDM-convention with the new display manager in Windows was actually enforced in 2014 for all computers (to prevent people from using "direct drawing" to "get more graphics POWER!" and things like that - there is no software component in the scrolling function that could possibly affect the rate that the page will scroll with.

    So the idea that bumping the processor from 700Mhz to 2800Mhz (and increasing the battery drain from 4w to 30w) is going to marginally increase the scrolling smoothness. This is so dumb that it defies any kind of description. The only way it would /indirectly/ help is if you 1. disabled the Windows window manager's indirect rendering through the registry. And 2. was scrolling a web-page full of extremely heavy maths that was a) exactly too complicated to complete at 700Mhz in 16.6ms. But nevertheless not as complicated as to still b) complete in more the 16.6ms at 2800Mhz.

    It's a super-specialized even that normally cannot happen.

    But the Asus guys simply angrily denies this and insists that bumping the processor speed increases the mouse scroll, because higher processor power equals Macintosh scroll, because reasons, and I'm stupid, and his father is more powerful than mine. And this will not be changed, and your computer will go into overdrive every time you scroll a web-page. Or don't scroll a web-page, but is simply scrolling into nowhere where the scroll-event itself isn't picked up. The acpi-override still is called.

    Meaning that on all asus-laptops sold since at least 2010. And certainly on all asus laptops updated in the last five years with "later" drivers, including the one from Microsoft through the Win10 install. Will have this braindead "feature" if you install SmartGesture on top of it.

    However, it turns out that the unSmartGestured package is available.

    http://www.asus.com/support/Download/3/589/0/21/41/

    And that the ROG-driver also installs (it's the same as the one here, just with added ROG stuff).

    And if you install this driver, after removing the smartgesture horror. You can have two-finger scroll and any of the other functions through the elantech panel. And also add the reasonably well known registry switches to further customize your driver if you would like to.

    But most importantly, your battery is not going to be drained for no reason. And your computer will stop mysteriously hanging and screwing up every bloody acpi-event and device you own, at every single sleep and wake.

    So if you wonder why your computer for example lose usb-hubs after you open the lid. Or why the computer shuts down irregularly after a hibernate. Or why the performance of the computer seems so weird and irregular. Or why you suddenly lose focus in the browser or any window for no reason, or why the event-log is full of thousands of acpi-error lists that you cannot identify.

    Then this is it. The ****ing smartgesture package, that Asus have inserted an override call to acpi in order to boost the processor state.

    This is perhaps even dumber than the way they have tweaked their bios - on all Asus laptops. By forcing the ram-timing to a mild overclock on all consumer-brand and ROG laptops alike (because someone at Asus can't tell the difference between sdram and ddr3 ram). That in the end annoyed even the ROG-folks so much that the official ROG tool hijacks the ram-timing through enabling xtu in the bios for those specific devices. So the ram-timing can finally be set to something sane. It does, however, involve a programmatical hot-function acpi-call through a client application. Because that's just how Asus works.

    That's not even to go into the entire "forced Windows media player media keys" on the keyboard. Through this aforementioned acpi-package - that indeed Asus buys, for money, from Microsoft. In order to enable this fantastic service for you. Although I suppose the cost is recuperated slightly by how the keyboard now forcibly launches windows products.

    In any case.

    So install this elantech mouse-driver that has been packaged with the Asus IDs. Keep this package you've installed. And overwrite the "updated" driver package from Windows update, and uninstall any Smartgesture driver that sneaks itself on your computer with this one.

    And I would advise you to buy a different brand in the future if you want to avoid this. But ther isn't any that doesn't have this same attitude towards branding and OEM specific acpi-device calls. So you're clean out of luck if you want to use software and drivers that have not been crippled in amazingly imaginative ways by mentally challenged morons hired by said OEM, to "help you" with your "support issues".

    So what you want to do with your next laptop purchase is this: find out which brand (i.e. Clevo, Lenovo, whatever) that functions the most completely with your standard Linux distro. Do they employ complex wmi functionality for their keyboard shortcuts that is impossible to use - toss it. And then choose this laptop that does not have these "extra functions" through the WMI-model and extended Microsaft acpi-call structure.

    They cost money for the OEM, and therefore increase your purchase cost. And the functionality you "gain" here is ruining your laptop experience as well.

    For the reason that a select few whining idiots have gotten it into their heads that the brand will sell better if they boost the clock-speed. To make time flow faster, or even go backwards!.. something.
     
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