E6410 Owner's Thread

Discussion in 'Dell Latitude, Vostro, and Precision' started by dezoris, Apr 12, 2010.

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  1. brave

    brave Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hello again John,

    I have an old AMD-based HP TX1410us that does very well with RMclock, so I also tried it on the E6410 (i5 560M 2.6GHz): it was always reporting the clock at full speed (and it was not!) and most of it's options were grayed out...

    I will give a look on this Intel XTU, which is new for me.

    (but I must be doing something wrong at ThrottleStop... I don't understand why it's not fixing a multiplier!!!...)

    Thanks!!!
     
  2. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    Everything you want to know about ThrottleStop, and a lot more, is in the ThrottleStop Guide in case you haven't been there already.

    John
     
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  3. brave

    brave Notebook Enthusiast

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    Hello,

    Current report about this E6410 (i5 560M 2.6GHz):

    -XTU does not work with this machine;
    -I tried a non-DELL motherboard driver (Intel(R) 5 Series/3400 Series Chipset Family 6 port SATA AHCI Controller), reported as 'older' when updating, but it works just like the DELL one (I mean, multiplier/FID up and down throttling)
    -I was having very high latency, could isolate the issue to NVIDIA NVS 3100M driver - got better performance with version 341.95, powermizer off and little tweaks like that.

    About ThrottleStop I believe I will have to read the entire thread to find an answer why I can't set a multiplier.

    Let me try to explain it better - my main page of ThrottleStop (5) currently is:

    (x) Clock Modulation: 100%
    (x) Chipset Clock Mod: 100%
    (x) Set Multiplier (9 is the min, 20 is max, 21 is Turbo)

    All these off: Power Saver, Disable Turbo, BD PROCHOT, C1E;

    All these on: EIST, More Data.

    While there is no processor intensive load (C0% 1 ~ 8), when setting multiplier from min (9) going up slowly (up to 20), I can see some relation between the multiplier I set and the multiplier shown at the side, like: when I set 9, it shows 9.xx ~ 10.xx; when I set 10, it shows 10.xx ~ 11.xx; when I set 11, it shows 10.xx ~ 11xx; but it oscilates a lot - 1 step set up at the Multiplier shows some .50 or so related on the FID.

    (C3% is show 0 while C0% oscilates 1~3; and C6% 79~82%)

    ??
     
  4. alexhawker

    alexhawker Spent Gladiator

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    Replied in the ThrottleStop thread. Please try not to post the same content in multiple places.
     
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  5. brainout

    brainout Notebook Enthusiast

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    Please delete this post if you think it's irrelevant or unhelpful.

    I just bought another 6410, i7, 8 GB RAM, since I liked my first one. But this second overheats. It had no OS, but would overheat while in BIOS. I didn't know the steps above, so thank you for that info. Meanwhile, I put it on a slatted shallow wooden tray, and installed 64-bit Fedora 25 KDE to a stick (no hdd), and it runs cool all the time now.

    Edit: Bios is still A05. I've downloaded the BIOS updates, which require first updating to A09, and then you can update to A16. Will do this, but haven't done it yet. I don't know if the updates will fix the problem.

    Dunno how many realize that you can install any Linux distro to a stick, rather than to hdd. Just have no hdd in the unit at the time you run the install, and designate the stick (or external drive) as the target for install. Works best on 32GB or greater stick, and clones totally using Clonezilla, so you can make one distro, tailor it to your desires, then clone as many as you like.

    I do this for all my Windows machines (18 at present count). Linux does better housekeeping. Here, the added bonus was that I could leave the 6410 that HAD overheated, on for two days and no problems. I wish I knew why.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2017
  6. John Ratsey

    John Ratsey Moderately inquisitive Super Moderator

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    The CPU power management may not work when in the BIOS so the chip may be running at full speed. Nonetheless, it shouldn't overheat if the heatsink and fan are doing their job properly. Anyway, you've found a work-around which boosts the cooling.

    John
     
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  7. Federico

    Federico Newbie

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    Bought some ram memory for my E6410 (i5 560M 2.67 GHz) so =

    OUT= 2 GB Hynix 1066 MHz x 2
    IN = (Next monday arrives) 4 GB Corsair macmemory 1066 MHz x 2.

    So i will have 8 gb, i hope that memory works, i will find that next monday when the product is in my hands.

    If someone has it, please tell me if it works or i failed XD

    Edit= It did work perfectly, now i can browse pages faster, seems like 4 gb is maybe not enought these days.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
  8. bennni

    bennni Notebook Evangelist

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    In the BIOS, the CPU runs at full speed but so far I've not had an overheating issue. The longest that I've had to use the BIOS menu is 30 minutes. I'd take a serious, long and hard look at the thermal paste and the heatsink/fan if the system is shutting down due to thermals. A BIOS update *might, possibly* help - I have the latest BIOS installed but I don't recall any heating issues with the older BIOS version. I had the i7 740QM quad core CPU (1.6 GHz) fitted before and it did get hotter (10oC on average) than the dual core i5 (560m 2.6 GHz) but it still didn't overheat in the BIOS. The i7 dual-core would get hotter but since the 2.6GHZ i5 sits at 70oC max for me, I doubt it's going to reach 30oC extra with the slightly higher clockspeed of the dual core i7 or even the quad core i7 if you have that. The 740QM that I had would reach a solid 80-90 when stress-tested with Prime 95 for three hours - that's hot but it's not enough to cause a thermal shut-down.

    In favour of Linux, I don't get the CPU-locked-down-to-the-lowest-multiplier-and-I-always-have-to-use-Throttlestop-to-run-at-faster-speed-issue, which manifests itself in Windows (Happens in Windows: XP, Vista, 7, 8.1 & 10, before someone suggests this). I think this may be related to a power supply issue IIR. On the other hand, when using linux it's a pain to run Windows in a VM, so that I may use the many Windows-only programs that I need. It works but having to run Throttlestop in Windows is less of a bother than having to run a whole Windows OS in a virtual machine if I use Linux. The thermals are both fine with either OS - Linux is a *bit* easier on resources but it's effect on thermals are negligible for me.

    I quite like Throttlestop as it allows you to set the CPU multiplier to whatever you like. If I'm just using MS Word, I really don't need full power from the CPU and the fan comes on a lot less if I lower the multiplier to X10 or X11.

    My old E6410 motherboard finally ground to a halt last week. Not sure which part failed but the system would not POST. Sometimes I'd get three status lights blinking but sometimes nothing. Tried everything to fix it but in the end I surrendered. I sourced another NVIDIA motherboard for about 35USD (26GBP or 30EUR for European users) and had it fitted in 2 hours (TBH, it could have been done faster if I hadn't hidden my thermal paste in the most unlikely place and spent 30 minutes looking for it...). The E6410 is now back, in all its true, 2010 glory. In all seriousness, with an SSD and 8GB of RAM it's more than adequate for typing up long pieces and doing research with. Dell actually make it quite easy to take the system apart and I'd rate my own repair skills as 'I-can-follow-a-YouTube-video' level. Definitely worth considering a DIY replacement if your own motherboard fails.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2017
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