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Do I need to buy 8GB Memory?

Discussion in 'Apple and Mac OS X' started by reducky4me@yahoo.com, Feb 16, 2010.

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  1. ajreynol

    ajreynol Notebook Virtuoso

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    eeeeh.

    your photoshop would do better with 4GB of system ram and by moving the scratch pad off of the drive Photoshop is stored on. you can get even faster by putting $ towards a good SSD.

    of course, the scratch pad tip only works if your system supports dual or tri-HDDs. no Mac laptops do. several PC laptops do.
     
  2. JWest

    JWest Master of Notebookery

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    4GB tend to be enough for most folks. Something else would likely bottleneck before your RAM did anyway. I'm a huge multitasker and I've never hit the 4GB mark (and I do use RAM heavy programs, like photoshop and dreamweaver).
     
  3. MKang25

    MKang25 NBR Prisoner

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    If you are going to be running VM then i would suggest 6gigs. 4gbs is JUST ABOUT ENOUGH for me so if you wanted to be on the safe side then getting 6 gigs would be good.
     
  4. Falundir

    Falundir Notebook Evangelist

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    If snappy performance is what you are looking for then 6gb and a SSD are king. If I had to choose between the 6GB and the SSD I'd choose a SSD.
     
  5. reducky4me@yahoo.com

    reducky4me@yahoo.com Newbie

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    Thanks for all the help everyone! I guess I am going to go with the 15' (70% chance) over the 13' and just going with 4GB of memory. I guess I probably wont go overboard on multiple processes at once anyways. The reason I came to the conclusion of buying 8GB of memory was after viewing this website (http://blogs.zdnet.com/hardware/?p=2354) for the Photoshop speed test.

    I want an SSD as well, but I will probably get an Intel 160GB once the price drops down to around $200 and will just replace my optical drive in the MAC with it.

    Also just curious, can someone give me a list of examples for which 8GB memory would be necessary or beneficial because I always thought virtual machines was the case almost all the time?
     
  6. masterchef341

    masterchef341 The guy from The Notebook

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    4 GB is plenty for running OS X and windows alongside it.

    Unfortunately, there are many other factors involved with system performance, and, especially when running two operating systems, "amount of system memory" is an issue, but just the campground by the base of a mountain of issues.

    Don't expect super fast performance in your virtual machine and OS X running at the same time regardless of the laptop components you buy.
     
  7. akin_t

    akin_t Notebook Evangelist

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    Not many applications really, the only thing that comes to mind is serious photo editing and even then I'm talking formats like RAW.
     
  8. masterchef341

    masterchef341 The guy from The Notebook

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    meh. even big raw files are only like twice as big as jpeg files.

    8GB could be useful for certain science and computational mathematics applications.

    not necessary for gamers or normal users, or even virtual machine users, unless you intend to run multiple virtual machines (like 4 vm's)

    but if you are running 4 vm's, you are going to have serious performance issues anyway, because you are splitting your actual computational resources 5 ways.

    having enough memory is like having a big enough house to fit the members of your family comfortably. without a sufficiently large house, the family dynamic will break down. you can still get by, but you will have to make serious compromises. once you have a sufficiently large house, getting additional rooms and space doesn't help anymore. and having sufficient house space doesn't mean that the family dynamic is good or bad, there are a whole set of other things to consider.
     
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