Disturbing video depicts near-future ubiquitous lethal autonomous weapons

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Dr. AMK, Nov 26, 2017.

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  1. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK Living with Hope

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    Disturbing video depicts near-future ubiquitous lethal autonomous weapons
    The technology described in the film already exists, says UC Berkeley AI researcher Stuart Russell


    Campaign to Stop Killer Robots | Slaughterbots

    In response to growing concerns about autonomous weapons, the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, a coalition of AI researchers and advocacy organizations, has released a fictional video that depicts a disturbing future in which lethal autonomous weapons have become cheap and ubiquitous worldwide.

    UC Berkeley AI researcher Stuart Russell presented the video at the United Nations Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons in Geneva, hosted by the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots earlier this week. Russell, in an appearance at the end of the video, warns that the technology described in the film already exists* and that the window to act is closing fast.

    Support for a ban against autonomous weapons has been mounting. On Nov. 2, more than 200 Canadian scientists and more than 100 Australian scientists in academia and industry penned open letters to Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Malcolm Turnbull urging them to support the ban.

    Earlier this summer, more than 130 leaders of AI companies signed a letter in support of this week’s discussions. These letters follow a 2015 open letter released by the Future of Life Institute and signed by more than 20,000 AI/robotics researchers and others, including Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking.

    “Many of the world’s leading AI researchers worry that if these autonomous weapons are ever developed, they could dramatically lower the threshold for armed conflict, ease and cheapen the taking of human life, empower terrorists, and create global instability,” according to an article published by the Future of Life Institute, which funded the video. “The U.S. and other nations have used drones and semi-automated systems to carry out attacks for several years now, but fully removing a human from the loop is at odds with international humanitarian and human rights law.”

    “The Campaign to Stop Killer Robots is not trying to stifle innovation in artificial intelligence and robotics and it does not wish to ban autonomous systems in the civilian or military world,” explained Noel Sharkey of the International Committee for Robot Arms Control. Rather we see an urgent need to prevent automation of the critical functions for selecting targets and applying violent force without human deliberation and to ensure meaningful human control for every attack.”

    For more information about autonomous weapons:

    * As suggested in this U.S. Department of Defense video:


    Perdix Drone Swarm – Fighters Release Hive-mind-controlled Weapon UAVs in Air | U.S. Naval Air Systems Command
     
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  2. Arrrrbol

    Arrrrbol Notebook Deity

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    This is a very bad idea. Imagine if both sides are using AIs to fight a war - what's to stop their "survival instinct" kicking in resulting in them teaming up against humans. This will change the way wars are faught: the fact that human lives are lost is what stops us going to war on every possible occasion - replace them with robots and war becomes much easier to justify. The last people on earth i'd trust with this technology are governments who will, no doubt, abuse it.
     
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  3. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK Living with Hope

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    I totally agree with you, but unfortunately they already developed it, and many other AI weapons to kill on identity, and they don't mind to use it even with their own people. God save us from what's coming.
     
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  4. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    The problem with the video is that the drone sizes they’re using doesn’t have enough payload to carry a lethal explosive. Something more like a firework: very annoying and possibly can cause injury, but nothing like a hand grenade. Drones big enough to carry such a lethal expolsive wouldn’t have the required range to perform something similar to the video’s scenario (assuming favorable wind conditions); at that point, you’re better off with a sniper, or an existing Predator with a Hellfire missile.

    Drones can be a real concern, though it’s not too helpful fueling such fantastic scenarios like this. Then again, I guess it doesn’t matter, considering the analytical skills of your average Joe. ;)
     
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  5. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Evangelist

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    It's only a matter of time until our electronics and power supply systems become a bit more efficient and advanced than they already are though. Super caps, new battery chemistry and designs aren't too far off in the distance. Capacities and outputs have been going up with the help of material science breakthroughs while consumption has been going down. Although it may not be realistic right now, I think it is definitely within reach to be developed to a point similar to what the first video is trying to depict. Would you say... within 20 years perhaps?
     
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  6. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    Capacitors are not replacement for batteries; they release energy (usually a lot) in a sort amount of time, and not over time as would a battery (good for something like a taser, but not for RC stuff). And 20 years is rather optimistic. Chemistry advances don’t run at the same pace as computer technology :).

    If anything, you’d be better off developing better mini-explosives or some other way to make pocket drones lethal. And even then, you’d have to make such combination of lethality and drones more practical than existing long-range solutions (like snipers, or existing UAVs, as I’ve previously stated).
     
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  7. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Evangelist

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    I appreciate your opinion, but I still believe it is within reach in 20 (30 if you want to allow a bit more room for error) years time myself. Hopefully that day never arrives though.

    Facial recognition systems and automated drone pilot systems have gone from 0 to 60 in a relatively short amount of time.

    My biggest argument against mini drones that shoot a bullet like explosive would stem from the fact that their mass is so small it seems like they would be blown backwards more than their projectile would be shot forward because of the physics of it all in general, but I'm no expert.
     
  8. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    Oh yeah, I also doubt that a mini drone could handle a gun’s recoil all that well.

    Anyway, I’m not too worried about this sort of thing to be honest. Seems more like a really neat James Bond story rather than a practical assassination technique.
     
  9. Mobius 1

    Mobius 1 Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    but I thought the hunter killer drone and the mq-27 dragonfire from black ops 2 is real? /s
     
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