DiskZIP 2019.1 Review

Discussion in 'Windows OS and Software' started by msintle, Dec 5, 2018.

  1. StormJumper

    StormJumper Notebook Virtuoso

    Reputations:
    537
    Messages:
    3,282
    Likes Received:
    419
    Trophy Points:
    151
    Considering they don't have moving parts probably not but that is why Windows 7 and higher had the TRIM to manage drive space. But as with anything all electrical hardware wear out from usage just that with a SSD when it fails there is no recovery options.
     
    msintle likes this.
  2. msintle

    msintle Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    15
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    60
    Trophy Points:
    41
    Thanks for your feedback. I really like how you are honest with your point of view, and make no excuses for it.

    If you check the links I shared above, you will find that the benchmarks I shared are real world results with AAA real world games, they're not synthetic benchmarks at all. I didn't even bother posting synthetic benchmarks, because the results look fake, even when they're not, because of the acceleration effect induced by the disk compression.

    Here is the formula that drives the acceleration process:

    Time to read raw, uncompressed data > Time to read compact data + Time to extract in memory

    There isn't any magic or snake oil involved in this. Even back in the days of Windows 3.11 with Stac Electronic's Stacker disk compression, Windows 3.11 booted up in 21 seconds on a compressed Stacker drive, instead of the 23 seconds it took to boot on an identical disk when uncompressed. That's on a 33MHz 386, if I recall correctly. It may still be possible to find the original PC/Computing article via a Google search, they have scanned in almost all magazines back from that era at the dawn of modern computing, and indexed them for text search.

    It follows logically that modern CPUs which are 1,000 times faster would be able to retain this performance lead, especially now that they are multi-core, and at any given time you have idle cores sitting around doing nothing. In a sense, DiskZIP is using your idle processing power to accelerate your PC.

    You are absolutely correct that nothing comes for free. You will still be paying for DiskZIP's read acceleration with the time you spend compressing your disk. I like to do this overnight using DiskZIP Offline, every other week or so, to pick up the slack from all recent Windows Updates and all the software I've uninstalled/newly installed.

    Their new tool - which is the informal topic of this thread above - promises to eliminate even this last kludge, by performing the acceleration at all times in the background. That's quite a leap, and if executed well, would be the next natural step in the evolution of this product.

    Last but not least - are you sure your friends who lost data were using DiskZIP? Or did they lose data back in the days of MS-DOS and the inherently unstable legacy tools of that era? As I wrote in the opening of my original review:

    "Many of the old timers I alluded to at the start of this section have had strongly negative experiences with transparent disk compression in the 90s. For as long as I have been using the product (almost two years now), I have not had any issues with data loss or corruption."

    It has now been three years for me and counting.
     
  3. saturnotaku

    saturnotaku Notebook Nobel Laureate

    Reputations:
    3,888
    Messages:
    7,272
    Likes Received:
    2,783
    Trophy Points:
    331
    I also have to say that the DiskZip website is kind of deceptive. A 28 GB capacity disk doesn't magically turn into 80 GB.

    Screen Shot 2019-01-11 at 10.23.47 AM.png Screen Shot 2019-01-11 at 10.23.56 AM.png

    Also, @msintle - are you being compensated by the company, either monetarily or with free copies of the software? If so, you need to state that up front, especially because your "review" reads like marketing copy.
     
    Ultra Male and msintle like this.
  4. msintle

    msintle Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    15
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    60
    Trophy Points:
    41
    I am not affiliated with DiskZIP in any way, other than being a very happy and very loyal customer. Happy and loyal to the extent that even though I am not making any money off of DiskZIP whatsoever, I am spending my own time here, trying to make a positive contribution with my reviews and writing.

    For the disk growth, I agree that is the most gimmicky part of the product. Please see a detailed description of the feature here:

    http://forum.notebookreview.com/threads/diskzip-review-finished.815511/page-3 - Section: "Tune: This is new and interesting, if not exactly useful."

    Essentially, in the screenshot they shared, the average compression ratio of the disk appears to be 2.8:1, since the disk has grown by 2.8 times over the uncompressed size.

    Their driver "projects" this growth in disk capacity. If you notice, used disk space has "grown" as well, because of how the driver works (although the used disk space is in reality the same). You can customize this projected disk capacity growth, or disable it altogether.

    What this is useful is if you are having to install or copy files, which *would* fit with compression, but Windows doesn't know that. So you project a larger disk capacity, to get through software checks. So far so good...

    ...BUT this mechanism breaks down unless you are using NTFS compression (with DiskZIP Online), because none of the other DiskZIP compression methods work on-the-fly. DiskZIP disables NTFS compression by default, because it is the worst performing algorithm - not only in terms of space, but also speed. NTFS compression will save you just a little bit of disk space, and cost you a ton of speed - very anathema to the entire DiskZIP premise. They know this, so they have disabled NTFS compression by default.

    So *if* you enabled NTFS compression (taking a HUGE and unnecessary performance hit) and *if* you were going to install/copy stuff that wouldn't fit on your disk without compression, *then* this gimmicky feature could be considered useful.

    Of course, that may all change with the new DiskZIP Resident beta on this thread. DiskZIP Resident performs non-NTFS compression on-the-fly, so it would actually make sense to project a bigger disk for more than just eye candy.
     
  5. Ultra Male

    Ultra Male Super Tweaker

    Reputations:
    20,739
    Messages:
    20,495
    Likes Received:
    29,885
    Trophy Points:
    931
    You will not convince me no matter what you say. Sorry. This just w0n't enter my brain.

    My friends who lost their data were not using DiskZip but similar compression Tools.

    It is very obvious that you are paid by the company to try to market their best next thing since sliced bread, good luck on that. It won't work with the intelligence of enthusiasts like us in the forum.

    Please don't quote me or mention me again I have no interest in replying to you.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2019
    msintle likes this.
  6. msintle

    msintle Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    15
    Messages:
    176
    Likes Received:
    60
    Trophy Points:
    41
    To clarify, this is not a response to Ultra Male, and none of my posts are meant to be a reflection on his intelligence. My response is to the thread and the forum at large, where people of intelligence certainly exist, and will be able to look beyond the FUD (fear, uncertainty, and doubt) that has unfortunately been attached to this thread.

    DiskZIP is patent pending technology and I am not aware of any "similar compression tools", which in all likelihood don't yet exist for modern Windows versions at all.

    Supposing they do, it would be most illogical to project the shortcomings of one product upon another; but I understand people have strong opinions, and they deserve full respect for sticking to their beliefs. Anything else would be an invasion of rights, of privacy.

    On that note, I would love to find and try any alternative disk compression software, as I am really into this kind of thing, as readers have surely noticed.

    Please see my post above for an explanation of my relationship with DiskZIP.
     
Loading...

Share This Page