Dell Xps 9700 arrived , test and upgrade hardware , usual power problems

Discussion in 'Dell XPS and Studio XPS' started by andytom69, Jul 8, 2020.

  1. andytom69

    andytom69 Notebook Geek

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    hi friends
    The version is I7 10850 rtx 2060

    just discarded I made a video for safety .. see link

    then I started it and I saw that luckily I have no problem ... see link

    so I decided to increase my configuration, brought to 32 gb ddr 4 2933 and according to m2 samsung 970 evo plus 1tb

    and finally I used the new m2 to put a new operating system without disturbances and wastes of space and I use the original disk for data

    At the moment I have no trackpad or monitor problems, there is the problem of power management when I use the rtx, the system partially uses the battery power, instead if you use intel video all right

    my only doubt remains the use of the ne bios function of ahci or raid for the controller of the m2

    for now I have left raids but I noticed that in ahci it still works and the advantage is that you can use the functions of the samsung magican tool. for the rest it looks like a good machine, I'm still configuring everything, as usual dell you never understand anything about how they manage power with their programs

    Ps if all goes well I mount the new dbrand film ..

    https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1OiQLld61WzEkTc3E8w1RDrSlGT6Hsow3?usp=sharing

    the usual problem remains that afflicts dell and others when things are small and powerful, in this case the power 130w and the type c port do not guarantee full autonomy to the processor together with the gpu rtx 2060, sucking power from the battery
     
    reas_seammes likes this.
  2. Philaphlous

    Philaphlous Notebook Evangelist

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    I find it hard to fathom that a USBc can deliver 130w... that just seems like the socket is waiting to melt down...I feel like any laptop powered with USBc 75w+ might be prone to this...

    Id be curious to see what undervolt you can get with the 2060 using MSI Afterburner and the voltage/core clock graph...
     
    reas_seammes likes this.
  3. reas_seammes

    reas_seammes Notebook Geek

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    At the risk of going off topic and maybe drawing some flak, I couldn't help but notice how they deliver 130W over USB-C.

    I couldn't find any vendors that provide solutions above 100W. Infineon, TI and ST all have their controllers limited to 100W per the USB spec

    https://www.infineon.com/cms/en/applications/solutions/power-supplies/usb-power-delivery/
    https://www.ti.com/interface/usb/type-c-and-power-delivery/getting-started.html
    https://www.st.com/en/interfaces-and-transceivers/usb-type-c-and-power-delivery-controllers.html

    I understand Dell might have extended the spec to suit it's chargers, but, given that there are no USB power controllers that support 130W, did DELL invest it's own time, money and resources to create it's own power delivery hardware ?
     
  4. custom90gt

    custom90gt Doc Mod Super Moderator

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    I sadly do not know the answer to this, but they've been saying they have a way to deliver 130w via USB-C since the XPS 15 2-in-1 9575.
     
  5. maffle

    maffle Notebook Evangelist

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    @reas_seammes Isnt the question simple to answer? 100W is just the official spec, anyone who makes cord and laptop can break the spec obviously. Dell did. They just have a different value in their power cord controller which communicates with the laptop, as simple as that. If the laptop can talk to the Dell cord and notices this, it will tell back the adapter that it is a Dell laptop vice versa, and unlocks the cord to deliver the 130. What else is there to add? So what is your question? You wont find another vendor, because it doesnt make any sense. Dell cord + dell laptop, the end.
     
  6. _sem_

    _sem_ Notebook Deity

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  7. reas_seammes

    reas_seammes Notebook Geek

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    "different value in their power cord controller"
    Programming a different value is easy, agreed. The real question is, who manufactured this controller that can support the "different value" to deliver 130W? If the controller is a programmable MCU, sure that'd be easy, but, if not, like in the links above, things are tougher now.

    Also, as @Philaphlous mentioned there the issue of that miniature USB-C port being able to handle those power levels.

    The USB spec says 100W is delivered as 20V-5A. For 130W, we'd need 6.5A. Now if you'd consider wire and contact resistances, that leads to ~70% higher requirement for heat dissipation.

    I read a bit more on this topic in this forum for these power draw issues and given that there are indeed solutions that work fine, my doubts my be unfounded.

    I feel that Dell might have gone out the way to do things this way. If so, kudos to them !
     
    maffle and pressing like this.
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