Dell XPS 13 Ultrabook Arrives at CES Discussion

Discussion in 'Notebook News and Reviews' started by Jerry Jackson, Jan 10, 2012.

  1. Dell-Bill_B

    Dell-Bill_B Guest

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    Dell doesn't innovate or take risks (/sarc), so that can't be right. :)

    I don't see it that way, but I guess if I were an Apple fan I would?

    You get what you pay for? There's a reason products with support contact centers in the US seem to cost more than ones with majority support overseas.

    Evidently we're way ahead of you on this one. The ability for customers to replace parts comes from our business heritage for sure. The benefits are there for both the consumer and Dell. Consumer gets his RAM overnighted to his location and has his box up and running in one business day without having to go to a store and make an appointment with a tech. We save a little cost. We've had CRUs and FRU's (Customer Replaceable Units and Field Replaceable Units) for decades. The way you word it, it sounds as though you are saying we send out a motherboard and expect customers to swap them. Also, a customer can request any CRU be shipped with a tech to come onsite anytime if they have onsite warranty. If they have mail in warranty, they can request to ship it in to have the memory module swapped out at the depot if they don't want to do it themselves. It's not a requirement that customers replace their own CRUs. We just encourage it to save us cost and the customer time.

    Neither can Apple. That's why while there may be a demand for their products from business users, but what IT guy wants to hassle with whatever machinations he has to go through to replace a laptop battery? Apple would much rather consumers bring their laptop into the Apple store so they can market to them while they are waiting for the battery swap. I'll take an overnight dispatch of a part I can replace myself in 5 minutes (and the flexibility not to have to DIY) over the requirement that I make an appointment, drive into a store, and wait for someone to do what I could have done myself at home.


    While I wish we were still a 100% direct, BTO company, the realities of the market (lost market share, shift in consumer laptop buying behavior) dictate that we partner with stores that have foot traffic. People want to touch it before they buy it more now than before.




    Pretty long in the tooth product also. TBH, I was never a huge fan of the DVP, but I don't think it's all that bad. My wife has one, and I've played around with it a bit. It's ok. For now, I'm good with my Samsung and Android. When we have something on the market that matches the Galaxy S II, I might give my employer back a little dough for one. :)

    Perhaps you don't see it, but your posts are dripping with judgement on Dell, which is fine and all. It's a fact of life that Apple fans are supportive of the company, but there's no way anyone can read your posts on this thread and not come away thinking you have both deserved and undeserved preconceived notions about Dell. While much of your assertions are surely based on experience, as you have pointed out, the rest stops just short of Fanboi-ism, IMO. They make a great product and consistently provide a great user experience, so I am definitely not faulting you there. No offense at all meant. Just pointing that out since you put it in print.
     
  2. SemiExpert

    SemiExpert Notebook Consultant

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    I cited two examples where Dell discontinued product and I was merely pointing out that the segments didn't develop as planned. It's not that Dell wasn't innovative with the screen hinge of the Duo or didn't enter the Android tablet segment in a timely manner.


    What makes you think I'm an Apple fan? Judging by the sheer number of Dell systems that I've bought, the evidence would point to me being a Dell fan. My experience with Dell is mixed, however.

    All of the sales and support representatives I've communicated with appear to have been based somewhere overseas. I don't have a problem with the notion of outsourcing call centers. That's not the issue.


    Without getting into specifics, I had to go through two depot repairs, the second to correct the first, and two do-it-yourself hardware replacements, both to correct apparent damage done at the depot. Oh, and this was my second system, the first having been returned for a full refund due to multiple hardware defects.

    Would most customers be satisfied if the depot knowingly ships them back an inoperable Latitude notebook, in two boxes, expecting you to fix it yourself?

    I dealt with the situation. Did it make me happy? Would it make you happy?

    If you want me to, I can get into specifics, right down to dates and every chatlog.




    Well, in my case, one part arrived at the same time as the notebook, and the second arrived next day after a very long telephone conversation. But the whole point is that this is after two depot repairs, the second to correct the first, and both DIY part replacements due to damage done at the depot. I'll give you specifics if you want. We got up into the double digits as far as the total number of FedEx shipments, all at Dell's expense, thank you very much. It took many hours of my time and I lost the use of the notebook for the better part of a month.


    Now in my case, the final outcome was positive, if not unambiguously so. Do I feel that this sort of implementation of Depot warranty service is satisfactory? Do I feel that it's normal for customers to perform two under-warranty repairs after two depot returns? What do you think?

    I don't seriously question why there is consumer acceptance of the Apple Store "Genius Bar" concept to customer service. Not anymore.


    The problem is that the shift to B&M has furthered the commoditization of consumer Windows notebook PCs. Moreover, with units spread across hundred, if not thousands of retail locations, these products are especially subject to discounting. Nobody takes the retail price of a consumer quality notebook very seriously any more. We all know there will be a weekly discount or clearance. We're living in an age when i5 Windows notebooks dip to $399 on clearance. Windows notebooks have become mere commodities.

    It doesn't help that the average consumer quality notebook now has a 150-220 nit display with narrow viewing angles that looks awful in the store. That's just a fact. A dim, narrow viewing angle screen looks awful under fluorescent lights. In contrast, when consumers look at a Macbook Air or Pro, they're looking at 300-350 nit display with wide viewing angles. The amazing thing is that Apple's displays still look good in the bright, glaring while lighting of an original Apple Store.
     
  3. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    Is this a joke? You're the most zealous Apple fanatic on these forums. You've repeatedly come into review threads of specific models, or two-model shootouts, and basically say that people should either buy an Apple or not buy anything currently on the market.

    I'm no iHater. Two out of my last three laptops were Apples, and my wife and I will likely buy an iMac all-in-one as our next computer purchase. But seriously, dude, you need to tone down the Apple-or-nothing responses that you've been putting in quite a few of these review threads. Asus ultrabook, Dell ultrabook, Toshiba ultrabook, your response is always the same and always vigorous and long-winded.
     
  4. Dell-Bill_B

    Dell-Bill_B Guest

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    Latitude to the depot? Man, next time you need service on a Dell, please send me a PM. That's ridiculous that you had to go through that. Apologies on behalf of Dell for the poor experience. If there are any loose ends to tie up, feel free to let me know in PM. I'll do what I can to make it right.
     
  5. flatsix911

    flatsix911 Notebook Evangelist

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  6. SemiExpert

    SemiExpert Notebook Consultant

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  7. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    Going back to the "why didn't they wait until Ivy Bridge" discussion, it looks like Ivy Bridge has been delayed until June (and if it's been delayed once, who knows if it'll be delayed again or if it'll have problems upon initial release). Thus, getting a Sandy Bridge product out now, instead of waiting, was definitely a good choice.

    http://forum.notebookreview.com/har...63-ivy-bridge-delay-til-june.html#post8327476
     
  8. SemiExpert

    SemiExpert Notebook Consultant

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    Now it looks like only dual-core moble Ivy Bridge CPUs will be delayed, most likely due to oversupply issues with outgoing Sandy Bridge chips, and that the quad-core models are a go for April onward.

    Intel is only delaying dual core mobile Ivy Bridge CPUs by VR-Zone.com

    So far, the cause for the delay seems to be the poor sales performance of Windows notebook PCs, not production issues. When Intel has a stockpile this big, they'll either have to liquidate it, and destroy brand equity, or destroy the stockpiled inventory and take a write-off.

    I think we all expected quad-core mobile Ivy Bridge processors to appear first, and this appears to be the case. At very least, the much anticipated 2012 Macbook Pro launch is important for Intel, since its probably the single highest volume application for Intel's quad-core mobile CPUs.

    As far as existing stockpiles of Sandy Bridge CPUs, we're already seeing an i5 Windows 7 notebook at the sub-$350 pricepoint. Yup, $350 for an 15.6" Acer laptop with an i5-2450M - and the "Recommended Customer Price" of the CPU alone is $225, according to Intel. Let the discounting begin!
     
  9. Mitlov

    Mitlov Shiny

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    Right, and since ultrabooks would feature dual-core mobile CPUs, not quad-core desktop CPUs (the distinction your article drew), Ivy Bridge ultrabooks would be delayed. Thus, getting a Sandy Bridge model out now was the right choice for Dell.

    As for your attempt to blame the situation on slow Windows PC sales, since Apple uses Intel Sandy Bridge too, I guess Apple's equally to blame...or equally not to blame for Intel overproduction, however you want to look at it.
     
  10. SemiExpert

    SemiExpert Notebook Consultant

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    I really don't know whether or not Ivy Bridge ultrabooks will be delayed. I'd assume that the release of Ivy Bridge ULV processors will be influenced by the update cycle for the Macbook Air, which no doubt is the best selling mobile ULV CPU product line. See a pattern here?

    As far as conventional 35 watt dual core CPUs, the last Apple model is the Macbook Pro 13." Again, it may or may not be the best selling product line in its category, but Apple manages inventories without undermining retail price points.
     
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