Dell XPS 13 2015 Broadwell Infinity Display Owners Thread

Discussion in 'Dell XPS and Studio XPS' started by tassadar898, Jan 16, 2015.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. GeorgeCat

    GeorgeCat Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    6
  2. r0c

    r0c Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    12
    Messages:
    141
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    31
    I would assume this is implemented for battery saving purposes and hope they update the bios soon to atleast allow us to disable it.
     
  3. bamaster

    bamaster Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    164
    Messages:
    237
    Likes Received:
    8
    Trophy Points:
    31

    That's kinda the point for buying this laptop. Ultra portability. There's no way to have that and still get 3 USB ports, full size HDMI/DisplayPort, and replaceable guts. That's why RAM is soldered on these days, to reduce space. Removable battery? Same thing.

    If I were you, I'd look at the Lenovo T440s. World class keyboard, swappable batteries, plenty of full size ports, and up to 12GB RAM. It just weights 3.5 lbs.
     
  4. AKmotorider

    AKmotorider Notebook Enthusiast

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    16
    No, it's plenty fast! No lag whatsoever. My editing program starts in a flash. Given, I usually only edit with it plugged in and a power plan set to high-performance. It actually renders faster and has better responsiveness than my 2 year old Windows 7 HP desktop, which I find hilarious. It looks fantastic, too. However, on a 13 inch screen, video editing will be cramped..at least in Sony Vegas, it is. I am constantly re-positioning the windows to fit whatever editing need that presents itself. However, photo editing is much less cramped compared to video editing. That's just something I have to deal with if I want a portable laptop like this, though.

    Remember, this is a high-end laptop. If it wasn't lightning fast, I'd send it back.
    IMG_2572[1].JPG
     
  5. airmt

    airmt Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    107
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    31
    So with the notebookcheck review piece (i5, QHD+), there was no noise while idling and battery in idle about 15 hours, web surfing test 9,5 hours! I dont understand how someone could have a piece that have fans always on and someone else's is quiet with the same tasks.
    Regarding to the battery - probably the automated test @NTBCHK proves that if you dont use the touchpad the battery runtime could be much much higher. Anyone wants to try to do a web surfing test comparison with touchpad and wired external mouse?

    othersteve: could you please check the usual power consumption? It seems like in the low idle your unit was discharging by a rate of just around 3W which is outstanding considering the QHD+ screen. To be able to achieve the 9,5 hours it can not use much more than 5W in average which would be really great. Is that really possible with that set up in real use?
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2015
  6. Johnmcl7

    Johnmcl7 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    52
    Messages:
    194
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    31
    No, that's not true at all - being thin doesn't make at any more portable even though it means sacrificing everything pretty much. The thin-ness doesn't make it any lighter nor reduce the foot print, I would much rather take a slightly deeper machine and get all those features back but obviously it works well for manufacturers if you can't replace or upgrade components. I have a very old Sony TX which is one of the original ultraportables and also one of the first with an LED screen, it's a tiny very light machine yet has a removable battery (7800Mah standard, 13000Mah extended), upgradeable memory, Ethernet and VGA ports, great keyboard and even an optical drive.

    An odd recommendation, aside from being a much larger device it has the worst touchpad I have ever come across on any PC, it's the only one I have to use a mouse with because even the trackpoint isn't usable as its buttons are part of the touchpad. Unfortunately the X240 shares the same touchpad and most of the same flaws as well with all the status lights being removed.

    I am giving serious thought to the older X230, it's the same footprint and weight as the XPS 13 but it packs in a decent range of ports, most of its parts are upgradeable and it runs silent most of the time with an SSD. No decent display options, no keyboard backlighting and only Ivybridge are an issue though and while the trackpad buttons are a waste of time at least the trackpoint buttons work fine.
     
  7. mrcasual

    mrcasual Notebook Guru

    Reputations:
    2
    Messages:
    69
    Likes Received:
    3
    Trophy Points:
    16
    With the power plan set to "high performance", Google Chrome running with ~10 open tabs & ~20-30% CPU utilization, the fan never shuts down. CPU temperature is around ~70C.

    Unless you run the system in "power saver" mode, crank the screen brightness down and keep just a browser/few programs open, you won't get your <50C temperatures and noiseless operation.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2015
  8. Johnmcl7

    Johnmcl7 Notebook Consultant

    Reputations:
    52
    Messages:
    194
    Likes Received:
    7
    Trophy Points:
    31
    I guess part of the problem is how do you define idle, when I say my PC is idling it's when I'm not using it and I'm not running any applications however there is still software running in the background which can need the processor and cause the fan to spin up. My XPS 13 is sitting silent while it's idling at the moment but last night it was quite noisy as there looked to be some background updates and installs going on. The problem for me isn't so much the fan coming on, it's the fact it's very noticeable - it seems to be on or off rather than being able to spin up quietly for background tasks like other machines can it just fires up quite audibly every time time it's required. I'm finding in normal use the fan is intrusive and given the underside of the laptop feels quite warm it's not that the fan behaviour is being overly cautious.

    I have the i7 with the QHD+ screen and 9.5 hours doesn't seem completely unreachable, I had the XPS 13 streaming video for most of yesterday evening and it still reckons it's got a couple of hours left.

    John
     
  9. othersteve

    othersteve Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    57
    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    31
    I would venture that such behavior will subside notably after all available Windows Updates are applied. Have you done all of them yet after receiving the machine? It is invariably the first step I perform on any customer's new PC after receiving it.

    As for Chrome -- yes, it can be heavy on the CPU at times. I find that it is equally often the fault of particular extensions running within the browser. Have you checked Chrome's built-in Task Manager option to separate which tabs/extensions/plugins might be to blame for this?
     
  10. othersteve

    othersteve Notebook Evangelist

    Reputations:
    57
    Messages:
    361
    Likes Received:
    16
    Trophy Points:
    31
    To all, a quick update on the Display Power Savings situation.

    I have done some quick troubleshooting on my end and have discovered that Intel's driver settings at least do not appear to be responsible for this. Either that, or Dell's XPS 13 is using a special version of the driver with the settings hard-coded to work with it.

    This registry key:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Control\Class\{4d36e968-e325-11ce-bfc1-08002be10318}\0000\PowerDpstAggressivenessLevel

    Is what I have found to be responsible for storing the user's choice for power savings aggressiveness.

    When DPST is at its highest setting, the contents of this Key will read 6. However, on the XPS 13, it is set to 0.

    This means the problem must lie someplace else. It may well be a BIOS or firmware-level setting that we are wanting to control. I would suggest the next step for troubleshooting would be to investigate whether this problem also exists in other operating systems (i.e. Ubuntu, Linux, whatever). If so, it is something external to Windows that would need to be changed. I would check this but I simply do not have time at the moment.

    I hope this helps.
     
    airmt likes this.
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page