Dell Precision 7540 and 7740 Owner's Thread

Discussion in 'Dell Latitude, Vostro, and Precision' started by djdigitalhi, Aug 13, 2019.

  1. JaqucesTati

    JaqucesTati Newbie

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    Just played 20 min, and HWINFO reports maximum total system power 226 W, and battery lost 5 % of its initial 100% load.

    A 240W power supply should be able to handle this, or is there anything else to consider?

    Just played 20 min and HWInfo reports maximum total power draw of 226 W, battery lost 5% of it's initial 100% charge.

    a 240 W power supply should be sufficient for that demand, - or do i miss something?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 4, 2019
  2. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    I think that you can only get 210W (or thereabouts) from the power supply after AC/DC conversion.
     
  3. JaqucesTati

    JaqucesTati Newbie

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    It is a bit dissapointing to see all these power limit & temperature throttlling reported by HWInfo or XTU even with reduced core voltages, never reaching the supposed 5 GHz, - max is 4.6 Ghz even in Ultra performance mode.

    My old M4800 never throttled as far as i can say, reached the numbers it had to and never got that hot. I'm really curious to see how long that machine lasts with these temperatures.

    Got an old T61p and R50, in both machines the graphic chip died because of too high temperatures, - and that weren't the 99° HWinfo reports for the cpu in this machine.
     
  4. va123

    va123 Notebook Enthusiast

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    That is very disappointing, but to me personally some what expected. I know a lot of ppl game and even do intensive and long load on gpu/cpu work, but what I see from portable devices is they really shine at short burst workloads, and anything that stresses and reaches thermal throttle and or power throttle with high sustained temps will deteriorate the components at an accelerated rate

    I know that few mfg do make gaming specific laptops and that might be best, that might also be best for long intensive cpu/gpu loads as those systems have far better cooling configs, and on top of that I believe that its best to consider middle tier configs and not go for max, because those system configs are going to hit those problems discussed really fast

    Also IMO when a laptop is not on your lap or not in travel settings, I always would say a very good cooling pad is key, as that will give some extra room to breath, and on top of that I am really considering modifying some of those cooling pads to go with standard 120 or 140mm high end fans, with their own power supply of course, since they would draw far more power and complete move air on bottom of laptop and give it fresh ambient temps, and not allow for heat soak to happen to the whole chassis so easily, remember in laptops everything that is not insulating is going to soak up heat, and radiate that heat or build up, u want to cool everything

    This is why I was very upset with the bottom cover being plastic with stupid copper metal spray, the old laptops like m6800 had a very robust build, and the metal bottom would stay very cool if you have nice cooling pad, I would pay extra for the bottom cover to be metal design, and the extra weight is well worth it

    I hardly ever use my massive workstation laptops on my lap directly, so to me the metal bottom case cover would not be concern for high temps possibly burning or uncomfortable

    honestly, if its not a laptop that is specifically designed for gaming and is massive, and handles temps and throttling very well, I would not do any intense gaming or I would run the games on lower settings to not stress the components or push them too hard, and if you choose to do stationary gaming (and have access to display, keyboard and mouse along with plug into wall) their is always the option of a small itx build, it will be cheap (compared to laptops), some what light weight for a desktop and the major issue is a display keyboard and mouse configurations

    That or have external graphics that has its own power connection, not sure if games work well in this as I stopped gaming a long time ago, but if you can only stress the cpu only and have external graphics that might be best option? along with good cooling pad
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 4, 2019
  5. n0xlf

    n0xlf Notebook Enthusiast

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    Monitor Name: AU Optronics B173ZAN01.0
    Monitor Name (Manuf): B173ZAN [Dell P/N: 8CJK2]
    Hardware ID: Monitor\AUO109B

    Unless the 7540 has a different option. This one is:
    17.3" UltraSharp UHD IGZO 3840x2160 AG NT,No WWAN,IR Cam/Mic,w/Prem Panel Guar 100% Adobe Aluminum
     
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  6. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    That's the 17" panel.

    @Alghorabi, I believe I’ve already answered your question. The ARGB 4K panel in the 7540 is the same as the one in the 7530, and it’s likely a Sharp LQ156D1 panel, given that’s the only one that has mounting holes.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 4, 2019
  7. Aaron44126

    Aaron44126 Notebook Prophet

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    Is this confirmed? I thought that the HDR400 panel in the 7540 was new this gen. (7530 4K panel doesn't have HDR.)
     
  8. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    As TFTCentral discusses, HDR400 simply means that the peak brightness of the panel exceeds 400 nits, colour width exceeds 95% SRGB, and colour depth is at least 8-bits per colour channel. The Sharp panel in the 7530 satisfies these conditions, and therefore, it qualifies as a ‘HDR400’ panel.
     
  9. Alghorabi

    Alghorabi Notebook Enthusiast

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    Yes HDR400 is a special option just for 7540 and the 7740 and as far as i can tell also need you to get the aluminum lid. The normal 4k panels from the 7530/7730 is also availible and dont need the aluminium lid.
    That could maybe mean that the new 4k HDR400 gets hot and need cooling?
     
  10. Ionising_Radiation

    Ionising_Radiation ?v = ve*ln(m0/m1)

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    Are you certain?
    As far as I can see there's only one 4K option, which also supports ARGB, on the 7540 and 7740:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    HDR was only mentioned in passing, and appears to have practically vanished from the marketing.

    Methinks it's the same display, so you can get the Sharp LQ156D1, @Alghorabi.
     
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