Dell Inspiron 1520: Viable After Market Upgrades

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Mihael Keehl, Oct 1, 2011.

  1. davshu

    davshu Notebook Enthusiast

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    I have a Dell Inspiron 1520 with USB 2.0.

    I have upgraded to:
    Intel Core 2 Duo T9500, 2.6GHz
    4 GB of memory
    Samsung Electronics 840 EVO-Series 250GB SSD

    I want to connect to gigabit ethernet.
    The options I am looking at are:

    USB21000S2 - USB 2.0 to Gigabit Ethernet NIC Network Adapter

    USB31000S - USB 3.0 to Gigabit Ethernet NIC Network Adapter

    EC1000S - 1 Port ExpressCard Gigabit Laptop Ethernet NIC Network Adapter Card

    ECUSB3S254F - 2 Port Flush Mount ExpressCard 54mm SuperSpeed USB 3.0 Card Adapter with UASP Support
    AND USB31000S - USB 3.0 to Gigabit Ethernet NIC Network Adapter

    Which is the best/fastest option (and why)?

    Thanks In Advance. This is a great thread!
    Dave
     
  2. tjaburke8

    tjaburke8 Newbie

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    I have a Dell Inspiron 1520 - DXDiag reports my system has the following:

    3GB of RAM (4 GB allowable)
    Intel Core 2 Duo T5750 @ 2.00GHz (2 CPUs)
    Mobile Intel 965 Express Chipset Family

    I'm wondering what the best upgrade would be to get it to work faster. So far I'm thinking my options are:
    1) Change out the 3GB of RAM for 2 x 2GB of RAM, making it 4GB
    2) Upgrading the Intel Core 2 Duo (not sure if that's possible or what the best upgrade for that would be)
    3) Adding an SSD drive (not sure what would be compatible - the only ones I can find are on Crucial.com, and those are all Crucial products, so I'm not sure if I'm getting the best deal).

    Thoughts? If you suggest upgrading the Intel processor, can you suggest what to upgrade to? If you suggest the SSD drive, can you suggest the type so I can shop around?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2015
  3. davshu

    davshu Notebook Enthusiast

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    tjaburke8, I would suggest an SSD.
    I have a Samsung Electronics 840 EVO-Series 250GB SSD in my Inspiron 1520 and I love it.

    I am now putting one in my daughters Inspiron 1525 and it is making such a difference.
    I had to change the cooling policy from Active to Passive because the fan was running all the time.
    I think it allowed the cpu to go faster than the fan could cool it. :)
     
  4. davshu

    davshu Notebook Enthusiast

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    I bought an AKE USB 3.0 ExpressCard 54 with the NEC Chipset Renesas uPD720202 5.0Gbps.
    I installed the Renesas 3.0.23.0 driver.

    Everything looked good.
    I can plug a USB 2 thumb drive in with no problem.
    But when I plug in any USB 3.0 device (even with power supplied to the card) the laptop would black screen and become nonresponsive.

    Has anyone used one of these successfully in an Inspiron 1520?
    Any ideas on how to make it work?

    Has anyone used another brand?

    Thanks,
    Dave
     
  5. RussianEnthusiast

    RussianEnthusiast Notebook Enthusiast

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    1.4GB would be better because there's will be full dual channel(full frequencies) and more RAM surething will eat more processes on your laptop
    2.Yes it's possible to upgrade try to look on Intel T9500 or Intel X7800 if you need more processor performance
    3.It would be compatitible only the problem is SATA2 in our laptop...Speeds of the SSD will be maxed for about 300MB/s because of the old SATA.All new disks are SATA3 but will work on our laptop as SATA2
     
  6. Sladetic

    Sladetic Newbie

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    Hello everyone, needing some help with eye strain on this laptop.

    I recently got my Vostro 1500 up and working again after replacing a dead 8600M GT.

    I immediately noticed that the screen I was using was really straining my eyes, so I decided to replace it. Not bright enough, I'm thinking?

    I've tried replacement inverters, two different replacement screens at different resolutions, adjusting the different settings in the NVIDIA control panel. Nothing is helping. After about half an hour, my eyes are screaming.

    Whites seems to be a bit on the dimmer, yellower side when comparing to my other Dell. Cranked up brightness to max, etc.

    Does anyone else have this problem? Is it just because they're old CCFL screens that are inherently dimmer than I'm used to, or is there something going on here? Changed to Dell recommended graphics drivers, latest NVIDIA drivers, BIOS (A06) says brightness is maxed. Running plugged in with no battery, could having the battery in help somehow?

    Now using a new OEM glossy WUXGA Samsung panel specifically for this model (LTN154U2-L06), and have adjusted the DPI so it's not the size of text etc. that could be straining me.

    Just spitballing some ideas and information, but maybe someone has an answer here. Thanks, everyone.
     
  7. mumpsimus

    mumpsimus Notebook Enthusiast

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    This is just my subjective experience, but after upgrading a Vostro 1500 to UXGA (and an 8600M GT) I was convinced it was dimmer and that I had a bum screen/backlight/inverter; whereas before I usually used it with the brightness down a notch from the maximum, now I was at the maximum and the whites were not super bright. I upgraded a second one and the results were exactly the same.
    I eventually got used to it, and now (when the screen is angled correctly, and there's no direct sunlight) it looks fine to me. I'm wondering if maybe this is always the case with higher resolution, at least on older machines - that with smaller pixels, you end up with a higher ratio of black between them, resulting in lower overall brightness?
     
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2015
  8. chopsumbongw

    chopsumbongw Newbie

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    Hi @napx

    Did you upgrade the screen to 1440 x 900 or 1680 x 1050? Any Issues?
    I am at the same cross road as you were a few months back.
    I plan to replace the HD with Samsung Evo 850 120GB, replace screen, replace battery and speakers.

    I need some advise on the screen. I prefer the screens the same way you did 1440 > 1650 > 1280
     
  9. Xepezeps

    Xepezeps Newbie

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    Hi, fist of all thanks to everyone for helping me to get the information I needed to upgrade my 1520 2 years ago.
    And now I want to upgrade the WIFI card but I don't know which one to buy. Which wireless card is the best I can put in my laptop? Is there any chance to put a AC wifi card?
     
  10. Apollo13

    Apollo13 100% 16:10 Screens

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    You can definitely use full-height Wireless N 450 cards such as the Intel 4965, 5300 (ebay - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Intel-Wifi-...799?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2ed2d46267), and 6300. I've personally used the 5300 with success, although I had at most a 150 Mbps network to test it with. It should work at the full 450 Mbps, however, as the 1520 does have enough antennas for it.

    You might be able to use an AC card such as the Intel 7260 (which may not be the best option - I haven't researched AC nearly as much as N), but I'm not aware of any full-height AC cards. It looks like you can buy adapters (http://www.amazon.com/Height-Express-PCI-E-Bracket-Adapter/dp/B007VXJ9IS) to use half-height cards with full-size slots, so you might be in luck with such an adapter plus an N card (ideally a 3x3 Mimo card if your goal is the highest bandwidth possible).

    In all cases, you'll also need a router capable of such speeds, which isn't necessarily cheap. It's also worth noting that if you go for one of the 450 Mbps N cards, a 3x3 N router will typically give slightly better performance than a 2x2 AC router (but not a 3x3 AC router), though exact comparisons will vary by model.

    Thanks for the post; I decided to go ahead and re-upgrade to the 5300 myself after seeing I could get a card for less than $8 shipped (gave the first to a friend). Please post back if you do try a half-height AC card with an adapter.
     
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