Dell i5 5402 Mods Part 2

Discussion in 'Dell' started by Not-meee, Dec 7, 2020.

  1. Not-meee

    Not-meee Notebook Geek

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    Here is the Samsung Magic Manager results

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2020
  2. Not-meee

    Not-meee Notebook Geek

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    The C: drive is the Pro
    The F: drive is the Evo Plus
    Default settings with testing set with SSD NVME

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Not-meee

    Not-meee Notebook Geek

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    After reading up on Thunderbolt, it is to have direct connection with PCI-E, so I have Thunderbolt 4.0? Won't know until I have some device that has such capability to test with. That is also a possibility for dual 4K monitors or one 8K monitor, on the Thunderbolt connection.

    Until I get the hardware specs sorted out, the only possibility of having PCI-E 4.0 speeds, is if the chipset is one of the versions that allows overclocking. It's more possible than an undocumented PCI-E 4.0 update, unless this model is destined to be a 2021 model, early.
     
  4. custom90gt

    custom90gt Doc Mod Super Moderator

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    Humm, those are significantly faster than expected results. What does hwinfo64 show?
     
  5. Not-meee

    Not-meee Notebook Geek

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    Yep, made my jaw drop, as I had given up on thinking I had PCI-E 4.0, from my original thread, by people telling me it ain't happening without Thunderbolt 4.0 or Intel's new chipset.

    I know $1k + laptops have Thunderbolt and LDDR4X ram. This laptop seems to have more than advertised, just the higher speed ram is not happening.

    I will get further along, I just had time to do the few tests. Never planned on needing to do more than just simple tests.

    Think I will do a 3DMark and Sis bench mark program as well.

    The big bummer is that I should have gone with two pro sticks, and never listened to anyone. Well next year 980 pros will drop when 990 Evo knocks on the door.

    I will post what I can later on in the wee hours. That's when I have time to mess further along. I have been mostly learning as I go deeper into the laptop, and Dell's way of managing recovery. I am glad I am ditching the factory image and recovery. Windows does very well for me and easier to control for recovery needs, though I rarely ever need to.

    I am thinking cache has nothing to do with the speeds I see. It looks like I was right to begin with, that Dell was lazy with making claims with what version of Thunderbolt and PCI-E capabilities. As the AMD variant won't match with Intel, so basic claims and port iidentification on the laptop meets with both specs, being generallized.

    Again this is not the first early release item that got a refresh just before the following year release. It's been going on with just about every thing since the 60s. I bet they give this model a new number for a March release or even early Feburary. Since there is no live reviews made on the model. Just too early or way too late in the marketing game.
     
  6. custom90gt

    custom90gt Doc Mod Super Moderator

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    AIDA64 will show link speed under devices and then PCI devices and then clicking on your NVMe drive. One thought that I have is maybe Dell is devoting additional lanes to it since there isn't a GPU or anything else to run. PCIe 3.0 8x will do those speeds easily. Standard specs are not defined by Intel, AMD, or any company, they have committees for that. PCIe 4.0 is the same everywhere.
     
  7. Not-meee

    Not-meee Notebook Geek

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    Pci-e 8x I doubt will exist on mid priced laptops. Plus I haven't seen any 8x cards, though we are talking M.2 card.

    Way back, Intel when made the 386, they did not publish an interupt for the internal math co-processor. There was many after market turbo mother boards that did not use the line. Only one that I know of that actually followed intel at an engineering level. Basically it comes down to engineering, how much do you want to spend on making a custom board, and the design requirements for mass production. If it's low cost, I doubt any effort will be done to make it function any better than what was required by design. On the other hand top of the line, may and has been cheapened out by AMD design requirements. For the same design under two differing CPU makers, Intel has always leveraged manufacturers to follow their guidelines after all Intel has to support their products for high standards. Two differing structures, AMD is a nice product but I see too many cost cutting ways with designs to make them any better and reliable than intel. None of three types of servers I worked with had any AMD CPUs. Though my point is simple when you design for the masses, you don't have to state specifics when two different designs fit into one groupe. Just be general in terms and it fits.

    This issue never was, when one design and model was made around one manufacturer of CPU. Once cost cutting in making layouts fit in a common footprint the specs may fall in and out of equal terms. Like memory addressing. You may find one make may have more addressable memory.

    Back to you your reasoning. AMD likes and pushes pci-e 4.0. It's possible the AMD boards in the same model, are in the same boat with hiding specs. AMD does not push Thunderbolt so they just emplement it because they follow the trend. Two competing platforms, but both provide speed increases through data streams.

    Maybe with mid priced systems they all support pci-e 4.0 if cpu supports it. Just marketing it as 3.0 to sell 4.0 on higher priced systems. Until more try using higher rated pci-e 4.0 cards on the 3.0 channel, we won't know how much has been under our noses for the last year. Obviously the last half of this year with 11th gen Intel on mid priced systems.
     
  8. Not-meee

    Not-meee Notebook Geek

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    Ok, here is proof I should have Thunderbolt 4.0 capability from having PCI-E 4.0 from CPU channels. I looked into the device manager and noticed Windows update has not loaded any chipset drivers for 11th gen CPU. Just basic drivers for each PCI device. As for proof in identification of channel speed or version compatibility here is the screen copy of the results.

    [​IMG]
     
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  9. custom90gt

    custom90gt Doc Mod Super Moderator

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    Sweet, glad Intel actually implemented PCIe 4.0 in their tiger lake products. Not that it actually makes a difference in something 99% of users will see, it's good to see them actually do this.

    How is the battery life and screen in this thing? Those are the two biggest things for me.
     
  10. Not-meee

    Not-meee Notebook Geek

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    Oh, I haven't really gotten down to the nitty gritty of how things settled down. Been multi tasking and getting confused by Dell's methods of making systems so limited. Seeing their BIOS a bit robust and all. Plus the lack of any real deep reviews with late in the year products. Like we are in Corona, and reviewers should be taking advantage of such an opportunity. I knew reviews have been paid adverts. Just i am not a reviewer, as my methods are around what can be done, not what you have on the spec sheet. What seems too obvious to me seems like some sort of mystery, in that every manufacturer has a like product of everyone else's, just rebranded to sell as their very own. I doubt this laptop, that is built around the 11th gen is the only one of the 12 different laptops available that are mid priced and lack the moniker of Thunderbolt 4.0. This sort of stuff is not new, and has not surprised me, after all I believed it was just a lack of effort due to being to cheap to pay royalties and have two different enclosures made to reflect the true specs of what what built around each CPU manufacturer.

    Enough rants... here is what I gathered after a few days, probably will level out after I am done with the tweaks, reboots, and what nots gone into redoing everything from scratch.

    Boot time 13 seconds and less. It's an odd thing, even if you shut down and wait hours, sometimes boot ups are as fast as waking from hibernation. Then you get the real boot times, to show you some cache is being done on shutdowns. Real boot times are around 13 seconds for now.

    I adjusted the default of 10% to 25% on the Samsung over provisioning. It's to keep some extra memory for wear, and allow extend cache further, with using less memory to map to.

    Can't wait for Samsung to release 980 Pro drivers, the basic NVME driver is limiting the SSD.

    Battery has calmed down... I originally broke it in by allowing the default slow charge with deep cycling. Now I have optimized it with Dell's quick charge feature. Note, HP and a few others have actually sold similar designed laptops with 45w power supply. 65w is minimum for Thunderbolt. Try 100w and higher, when set at desktop mode and raid5 plugged in to Thunderbolt port.

    The battery can last 10 hours and even more with average use. Once you get into performance switching fans are noticable but not too aggressive. You can make it run in performance only, so I doubt you wI'll get more than 3.5 hours of game play on battery, with settings set to maximum for graphics and cpu.

    Having two drives has sped up cache and loading of apps with their temp files located on the second SSD, my swap file, and work drive.

    On default the the battery and system runs just fine, cool and quiet.

    I prefer the 14" because the mouse pad is near center, as the display size increases, the mouse pad shifts more left. I some times right click, because my right hand is centered while the mouse pad's slight shift to the left, makes the presses within the just right of center area, be right clicks. I may have to place a request by Dell or the manufacturer of the touch pad to allow offset adjustment of center or near center. Thus way such issues with hand placement, will be a mute issue.

    The touch pad is awsome, large and responsive, one mouse button, being the pad. Just where you touch makes the button below left or right on your clicks.

    Display is bright, but I only go no higher than 50%.
    So with any display the brighter the more battery consumption.

    Believe me or not, the oem SSD sucks! I cannot stress this any more, without making a asshat out of me. I think by doing so with mid priced laptops, it makes their higher priced laptops look good in the reviews bench marks.

    Everything about the laptop has livened up since adding the ram for dual channel use, and using a fast SSD. If I had only 4GB, which nobody offered on builds... I would have just popped in another 4GB, even though my video memory would be 8MB. The performance would out do my original build given on the order. Just because both video and system memory were set by single channel with just one 8GB chip.

    So with any mid priced laptop expect to dump at least another $150.00 after paying for your laptop, to make it near the top of the food chain. In some respects, mid range is base to build upon. Once you get near 1k, on any comparison, the cost of buying just below flag ship is a waste. You getting better performance but still limited.

    Of all the laptops, this is a true sleeper. I would say a flagship for 2020 on the all around performer league. I just love having two full sized M.2 slots, and a large capacity battery. Few offer those two options, even in the higher price ranges.

    One thing Dell has that I like, 30 day return, on them. So if you find it not what you wanted, return it.

    I would have paid a wee more for a 15.6" but the 14" grew on me as it got further into using it. Bigger keys and a simple keyboard layout. I recommend doing a clean install, and turning off secure boot. You can also disable Dell OS Recovery in the BIOS. No sense in keeping it enabled, if replacing with a fast SSD. Windows recovery works just as well, and does not give the run around with popping in and out of bios routines to find what your looking for.

    That's it in a nut shell. A wee bit of work and $150 spent wisely, will give you one mean portable machine, that will impress you. The big thing I still have issues is Windows 10 start menu. It's not laptop friendly and the time spent adjusting it to my needs, won't fix it, and could be used in final adjustments elsewhere.

    I will add more or possibly just make a 3rd thread on direct facts that are clean enough to rely on, than my two threads that move in and out of speculation, and facts, and a bit of trouble shooting Dell's convoluted setup.
     
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