Critical Flaws in Computers Leave Millions of PCs Vulnerable

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Dr. AMK, Nov 21, 2017.

  1. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    Backdoor: ASUS had been warned about risks for months
    Published on March 28, 2019 by Günter Born
    [​IMG]
    Two months before it was revealed that the ASUS Live Update Utility had been compromised and backdoored, security researchers had warned the computer manufacturer about it. Because they had come across unbelievable sloppiness.

    Probably Micro$h4ft that hunted after some better publicity. After everything thats went wrong with their latest and greatest tragedy... They really needed it.
     
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  2. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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    Intel Chipsets' Undocumented Feature Can Help Hackers Steal Data
    by Lucian Armasu March 29, 2019 at 9:50 AM - Source: Positive Technologies

    The bad news is that the Positive Technologies researchers found a way to disable VISA using an older Intel ME vulnerability. Intel released a firmware patch that fixes that vulnerability back in 2017, but unless your laptop maker or motherboard maker has sent your the updated firmware and you updated your system with it, your PC will remain vulnerable. This bug can’t be fixed through operating system updates.
     
  3. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK Living with Hope

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  4. Robbo99999

    Robbo99999 Notebook Prophet

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    Interesting, how safe are the majority of routers out there being used by households from attacks & hacks? I'm not talking this specific router, but in general? Does changing the admin password & disabling remote log on prevent the majority of the attacks/hacks. There's got to be a lot of old routers out there, I wonder at what point they become unsafe to use? (Not just questions for you, anyone.)
     
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  5. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    If/when the manufacturer stops releasing updated firmware for known fixes, toss it away. Netgear is one of the worst for abandoning currently sold (and otherwise usable) routers when a new model is released.

    Changing the admin user name and the password to at least a dozen, random, characters is a good start. As is making sure that UPnP and WAN access is disabled too. Port forwarding is also something most users don't need. Even with the garbage Xbox and other gaming consoles 'instructions' available on the web.

    There is much more to make a network secure, but for home users, making sure of the above makes them safer than 99.9999% of the rest of the users out there.

    With all this said, the most common way that a network is compromised (even the router itself) is when an outsider's device is allowed on it.

    NEVER, EVER allow anything other than the equipment you own and control on your network. Wired, especially, but WiFi connections too (even on most home routers weak 'guest' networks). Most people think that wired, main WiFi and guest WiFi are three different connects. They're not. :rolleyes:

     
  6. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKs Sucks! Dont waste your $$$ on FILTHY

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  7. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC Moderator

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    Or deploy two different models in a row; would be an off-chance if both are vulnerable to some exploit or another. Yet so, then a three-in-a-row setup would make such a possibility pretty much negligible.

    Another consideration for such a setup is that even if a device is within warranty, receives adequate, ongoing support and has no known vulnerabilities then that still does not necessarily mean it is a safe, secured device; after all, it is usually discouraged to inform the owners you're trespassing on their property.

    Or flash any other custom, diy bios version, of course. So ...
     
  8. Dr. AMK

    Dr. AMK Living with Hope

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    I believe that all kind of BIOS's from all vendors has something inside to hack you in cooperation for the benefit of their governments. No escape except you are a highly skilled developer and you can create your own.
     
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  9. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC Moderator

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    Not so much bioses I'd be worried about; there's too many people working on them to keep such nefariousnesses a secret for long. Intel, AMD and networking systems are quite another thing; nicely concentrated and system-dependency is nearly total.

    That Huawei debacle is just silly; if you don't trust them to supply clean devices then simply insist on schematics and firmware access. PCBs aren't some magic, black boxes wherein arcane dark arts are taking place; if it isn't on the board and in the software then those backdoors and loggers simply aren't there. And the sums necessary to roll out 5G aren't a pittance, so why needlessly limit your choice of vendors when locking up a few nerds in a shed for a few weeks together with the devices and code is all it takes to safe several of those billions?

    There is one reason you might think of; those in charge of spending these sums aren't necessarily the most technologically astute (are they ever?), so gut-feeling and hearsay may well play a bigger factor than do cold logic and hard data.
     
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  10. tilleroftheearth

    tilleroftheearth Wisdom listens quietly...

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    That still won't work, for the issue, I mentioned above.

    Worse, the double and triple NAT'd nature of the network is now compromising usability (or, ports will then need to be opened anyway, between the routers). I would think that the performance (latency) of the network will suffer too, as the ISP speeds continually increase, the older (any current) routers simply can't keep up.

    The best way to continue using them is probably just as an AP. The best way to continue having the best performance is to get the current model AP's instead. ;)

     
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