[CPU + GPU Temperatures + Benchmarks] - XPS 15 [9560] Kaby Lake

Discussion in 'Dell XPS and Studio XPS' started by iunlock, Mar 10, 2017.

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Which configuration do you have? (Select 3x)

  1. i7-7700HQ

    89.5%
  2. i5-7300HQ

    9.5%
  3. i3-7100H

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. 4K UHD

    55.8%
  5. 1080p FHD

    32.6%
  6. 56WHr

    11.6%
  7. 97WHr

    74.7%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Evangelist

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    I think you posted a thumbnail, as I am unable to enlarge this image for better viewing when I click on it. :( I saved it to my desktop and zoomed in and it is just barely legible however. lol... Thanks for the insight. Is this possible on the 7577 which has very similar hardware ( i7 - 7700HQ & GTX1060 ) to the XPS?

    Also, @iunlock do you think your same mod could be worked into a Dell 7577? The hardware layout is very similar, but with the 7577 having a larger chassis and slightly different cooling output / layout... This thread has me itching to at least repaste my CPU / GPU with some quality compounds to get a glimpse while I'm in there... you know, for science. ;) The thermals are supposedly pretty good on our 7577's in the first place, but top-center above the keyboard (similar area as yours) is the hottest spot without a doubt. I would love to get my temps down as low as yours to improve longevity and reduce throttling that comes with having the i7+UHD vs the i5+FHD most people ordered theirs with. I would love to make a video of the process for others in the 7577 forums and/or get your opinions on modding options based on the layout and size constraints which you handled very well here on your XPS. @custom90gt do you have any thoughts seeing as how you have at least owned a 7577 briefly and did this mod to your XPS machine? Thanks for the inspiration guys!

    EDIT:

    Also, even when my 7577 machine is under heavy load and throttling due to temps, the air it is outputting barely seems hot. I'm not sure if it is due to the velocity of the air (much higher than my old HP laptop with single fan where the heat coming out of the exhaust was noticeable) or the fact that it is dual fan, but it seems like the spent air coming out the exhaust should be a little warmer to indicate efficient thermal transfer through the heat pipes when it is loaded up. Thoughts here as well?
     
  2. djkanoko

    djkanoko Notebook Enthusiast

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    That is the full image. My default font is a particularly small pixel font which is why the text may be difficult to read. Basically after finding a stable overclock, open the Afterburner curve editor and just pick a point on the curve at a lower voltage like 1.000V and drag all the points to the right of it down to the same level or lower. I assume this will work with any other modern GPU, but the easiest way to test is to use a voltage monitoring tool like HWinfo.
     
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  3. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Evangelist

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    Totally. I understand the process, I've just never had a modern, powerful system that wasn't completely locked down before. My last HP laptop has an i7 3632QM w/ GT630M that could only edit the clock and memory speeds.
     
  4. custom90gt

    custom90gt Notebook Deity

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    Sadly I didn't take the whole laptop apart to check on possible cooling mods. It would require the motherboard to be removed from the laptop. A funny thing is that I have a new in box 7577 that I am going to sell if my XPS doesn't move on craigslist. If my XPS sells I'll probably open up the 7577 all the way and at least repaste. In terms of it needing it, it doesn't. The VRM, CPU, and GPU temps were all very good in the 7577.
     
  5. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Evangelist

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    Wait, you got another 7577?? Lol. That's cool though!

    I guess my ultimate goal would be to be able to torture stress test it with the harshest synthetics (Furmark, etc) and it not throttle or overheat at all, but I'm not sure if that's realistically possible even with mods. I don't have an IR Flir gun, but I do have a thermocouple I can use with thermal putty that attaches to my multimeter if I decide to go that route for testing.

    I'm planning on using TG Conductonaut / GELid Extreme / Fujipoly XR-m thermal pads and at least repasting mine. Thankfully it has square heat spreaders and not tripods, but I will likely lap all the surfaces involved and possibly even add copper shims to increase contact pressure.

    Is there a consensus on lapping/sanding heat sinking surfaces vs polishing surfaces smooth for optimal heat sinking? I was under the impression a slightly scuffed surface yielded more surface area for TIMs to fill in and (in the case of liquid metals) hopefully not be as prone to leaking/pumping out. Thoughts?
     
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  6. custom90gt

    custom90gt Notebook Deity

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    Yeah I have another sitting in a box that I also got for a good deal. I had someone lined up to buy my XPS but they backed out at the last second so now I have two laptops again... Thermocouples will work great, but getting to the other side of the motherboard will be painful, I'm not sure how well you can test anything. Don't run Furmark on a laptop or even desktop, it's not a realistic test and will damage something even with amazing cooling. I say if you can run Realbench then you're good to go.
     
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  7. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Evangelist

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    Oops, hopefully the 30-60 minutes I ran Furmark didn't hurt my 7577 then. I could see it throttling and the temps were definitely high, but the machine never shut off and the fans were running full blast the whole time iirc. I didn't intend for it to run that long, but I forgot about it briefly while eating lunch that day.

    What about Furmark set to a resolution that only puts ~90ish % GPU load and doesn't keep it pegged at 99/100% load?
     
  8. custom90gt

    custom90gt Notebook Deity

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    Furmark is damaging not just to the GPU itself but to power delivery systems. You can do whatever you want, but you won't catch me running it for more than maybe a couple mins.
     
  9. Maleko48

    Maleko48 Notebook Evangelist

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    I'm not too worried tbh... I have tortured lesser laptops worse and they are still kicking just fine. I am in the camp of, if a system fails from something like running furnark for an hour, it wasn't designed right in the first place or was the componentry was faulty to begin with.

    Moving on, I have been reading through the 7577 service manual and looking for 7567 teardown images (since there definitely aren't any at all for the 7577) and it doesn't really seem that bad to repaste the 7577. Am I correct to assume all modern heatsink contact points are copper, even if inlaid in an aluminum heat sink mass or spreader plate? Asking because of liquid metals and ordering concerns. I want to make sure I order the right stuff to get the job done the first time.
     
  10. pressing

    pressing Notebook Deity

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    I would not assume that. You need to look and ask someone experienced with your model laptop to have a decent level of confidence.

    Ideally you want zero thermal coumpound with the two faces meeting perfectly. The TIM will fill in slight imperfections as it is much more conductive than air. So Idon't think a scuffed surface is ideal for TIM.

    One challenge of lapping laptop parts is that they are very delicate and can easily bend making things worse. There are a couple of lapping threads here at nbr although I think most are a bit older.

    For liquid metal applications there are some excellent recent threads at nbr. I think @Mr. Fox has some new techniques to reduce leaking risk (e.g. some type of nail polish & foam barrier). I think he recently changed his LM of choice due to leaking. He also has some youtube videos with more details. I don't know if a slightly scuffed surface would be better for LM but you absolutely need flat mating surfaces.
     
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