CPU 45W TDP Limit

Discussion in 'Hardware Components and Aftermarket Upgrades' started by Danishblunt, Nov 21, 2017.

  1. Danishblunt

    Danishblunt Notebook Virtuoso

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    The thing is you can still fix this with a microcode BIOS update, this is a quote from the article you posted:
    Now the question is which processors are "unfixable" and which are "fixable".
    And yes, you might be lucky and find a BIOS that fixes this for you getting your 4GHZ or whatever you would like to OC it to, since you do indeed have a 5950HQ :p

    EDIT:
    Oh cmon, you didn't either, why else would you ask me to make benchmarks longer and longer because you thought my 4940MX would set a limit over time like yours.

    Locked CPU's also don't require more power than 45TDP tho, as stated even on stresstest I can't get beyond mid 30s TDP on a 6700HQ. So the limit of 45 would not affect my performance in any way shape or form, also how the window affects nothing but a system that wants to go beyond the limit but is holding itself back due to BIOS/CPU.

    The explanation I gave you with the window on that thread was 100% correct, however if the CPU rewrites or doesn't accept your changes which you set in XTU, then obviously the time window will become important because the set max TDP which the CPU/BIOS has set has stock a higher turbo short power TDP than a normal Turbo TDP. Now it also makes sense why your CPU acts the way it does.

    I assume that the "fix" the guy who made the post was, is actually just an unlimited time window, which would allow higher TDP, mabe even unlimited depending on what the CPU/BIOS has set.
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2017
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  2. Unhappy User

    Unhappy User Notebook Consultant

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    correction: My MSI GT62VR has an i7-6700HQ.
     
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  3. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Deity

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    This x1000

    I'm assuming Prema BIOS is also installed - where the point is removing all the limits imposed by current limits, turbo short/long power & duration, etc etc etc by making them editable.

    FYI here's some shots of various limits. Note that NONE of these showed up any limits on HWinfo or Throttlestop because you're on your own with figuring out what's happening with an Ivy Bridge heh :)

    A QM with unlocked BIOS and turbo limits was nice, but an unlocked XM CPU with BIOS freedom is just a tinkerer's dream. I don't think I can go back to locked down stuff ever again.

    The limit is how happy you are with how many volts you're shoving into the silicon and how hot you're willing to have it get, just like real overclocking.

    x42 (4.2GHz) on the initial phase of Intel Burn Test:
    [​IMG]
    then after some thermal throttling (lower multiplier) was starting:
    [​IMG]

    x42 no limits: straight 42.00 average multi, through the whole test run.
    [​IMG]
    85A current limit juuuust being tickled:
    [​IMG]
    65A current limit:
    [​IMG]

    x45 at 85A current limit: (note avg multi at x42 was 41.98; higher voltage at x45 wastes power)
    [​IMG]

    here's x45 tickling the turbo short power limit because this happens immediately:
    [​IMG]
    and again with raised turbo power limits, a flat 45.00:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2017
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  4. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    They weren't talking about hacking the CPU limit, they were removing impediments to changing the power limits in the BIOS, so they could be raised, and used by the CPU - but the same "TIMEOUT" happens eventually, after a couple of minutes.

    And, actually it's more "breakable" than "fixable", as the HQ CPU / BIOS is set to work "correctly" as shipped.

    The cooling and power are designed to handle the HQ CPU as limited in the BIOS, and not as it could run recognizing the Turbo Boost Short Power Max increased power.

    Freaking out over what something isn't is one of the weird things people fixate on in this hobby.

    Once hacked or unlocked (not really), you don't gain much if anything anyway due to power supply and cooling design. You may have bought the wrong laptop if you are trying to break it to fix it.

    Just enjoy HQ CPU's for what they are, tune them as possible: undervolt and increase the Turbo Boost Power Time Window to the maximum seconds + increase the Turbo Boost Short Power Max to some arbitrarily high value - like 200w, and enjoy :)
     
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  5. Danishblunt

    Danishblunt Notebook Virtuoso

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    I will not argue about cooling, we all know without exception, notebook cooling is terrible. Modding is almost always needed. I'm also talking from a persepctive from a guy who would want to get "the most" out of his system. And as you pointed out, the EC firmware and PSU are also a factor, however, there are notebooks out there that do have an "oversized" PSU and have a rather big amount of extra wattage to play with, those mostly apply to older systems tho, newer system are restricted as can be.

    @bennyg:
    Oh my god 102c, never seen that before :D

    From my experience higher AMP to lower Voltage ratio works most stable and is cooler than the other way around.

    Impressive clock speeds man, how stable are they running over time?
    Also arent those voltages a bit high for an ivy bridge? Seems rather massive to me.

    3.6ghz into almost 1.2voltage is excessive, or are you not able to change to static voltage on ivy bridges?
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2017
  6. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    Cool :)

    It's got the same limitations as all HQ CPU's, so all the rest is the same.
     
  7. hmscott

    hmscott Notebook Nobel Laureate

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    It's just the way it is, there's no reason to jump through hoops and waste so many hours, weeks, months, years on getting the laptop to do 1% more performance, you'll soon forget it's a tool to accomplish so much more.

    Tune for the low hanging fruit, whatever can be done quickly, and enjoy using the laptop for what you bought it for.

    Perspective, and learning the limits, tuning for best performance without making a career out of it, it's a good thing...
    54f9628368618f700992f9a609e76a3300c9f260c65264e07cfb82b13cc55c54.jpg
    And hard as you might try...
    Tlww58s.jpg
     
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2017
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  8. bennyg

    bennyg Notebook Deity

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    Set the amp limit way high, it's getting in the road. Since P = I * V, as you are clamping current (amps, I) and lowering Volts by undervolting, it's yet another form of Power limit (Watts) on the CPU.

    Go run an AVX workload (handbrake, realbench, prime, linpack/Intel burn test etc) and see what is really limiting your CPU as it tries to draw +20W on top of what you see there.
     
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  9. Danishblunt

    Danishblunt Notebook Virtuoso

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    In some cases I agree in others I don't. If I see potential in something, then I wanna get the most out of it, see it as my hobby ;)

    Some people enjoy getting the absolute best ouf of what they have, if u're an everyday normal guy using a notebook then yes, I agree fully, most people won't even fully use the "power" of a 6700HQ let alone some massively overclocked XXXX CPU, but for people who like to tinker with notebooks, I think it's important for them to know before buying an HQ processor, which can do what and what they can't. :)

    Also that racoon is worth a like :'D
     
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  10. Danishblunt

    Danishblunt Notebook Virtuoso

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    I was told that AVX workloads in prime break Haswell CPU's. I'll try intel burn test and see what happens.
     
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