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Copper Mod on Acer Aspire 4937G (NVIDIA G105M)

Discussion in 'Acer' started by chunlianghere, May 7, 2010.

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  1. chunlianghere

    chunlianghere Notebook Consultant

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    i believe many of u experience gpu reaching near 100 degrees when gaming, causing laptop to jus turn off by itself.

    a gd news here..copper shim solve the problem, which means it lower down temp to prevent tat from happening.

    received copper shim in my mailbox yesterday.



    thickness is 0.044", 1.11mm, 0.1cm (*actual fit thickness is 0.9mm, wan abit more thicker, get 1.0mm)
    <img src="http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae27/chunlianghere2/DSC09374.jpg" width=400>

    size is 0.75", 19.05mm, 1.9cm (kind of too big for gpu, becos the seller hav tat size for tat thickness, but nvm, look below)
    <img src="http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae27/chunlianghere2/DSC09375.jpg" width=400>


    wat i do next is to use a sand paper(fine one, not rough one), i use 1000cw since i had tat at home. lazy to go out to get more fine one.

    do it on a flat surface, sand until like mirror effect.


    now proceed to dismantle the whole laptop.


    it seems tat the heatsink is too small for tat copper shim, but no need to worry, the surrounding alum is a little lower than tat copper.
    <img src="http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae27/chunlianghere2/DSC09397.jpg" width=400>

    <img src="http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae27/chunlianghere2/DSC09383.jpg" width=400>

    <img src="http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae27/chunlianghere2/DSC09386.jpg" width=400>

    using Arctic Cooling MX-2. apply on both cpu, gpu, n on copper shim after placing over gpu.
    <img src="http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae27/chunlianghere2/DSC09401.jpg" width=400>


    Stress test results

    *Ambient Temperature: 32 degrees

    Before copper mod, wit default thermal pad. i immediately stop the test b4 it blackout.
    <a href="http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae27/chunlianghere2/stresstestgpu2.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae27/chunlianghere2/stresstestgpu2.jpg" width=640></a>


    After thermal pad was replaced by Copper Shim.
    temperature was still steady at 88 degrees after 11mins! :D
    <a href="http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae27/chunlianghere2/stresstestgpuballcoppermod.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i954.photobucket.com/albums/ae27/chunlianghere2/stresstestgpuballcoppermod.jpg" width=640></a>
     
    Dxdino likes this.
  2. BruBoo

    BruBoo Notebook Evangelist

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    No thermal compound ?
     
  3. TehSuigi

    TehSuigi Part-time Acer Moderator

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    The copper shim acts as the thermal interface, and if done well can perform more effectively than compounds.
     
  4. BruBoo

    BruBoo Notebook Evangelist

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    hmmm

    I guess the best proof of that would be for someone to apply a micro-thin layer to both sides of the shim. . . . (I do mean micro thin - the aim of thermal compound is to fill the valleys on both sides if the interface while adding little or no distance between the highest peaks. It is not glue or bath sealant, but conducts heat much better than an air gap !)

    In theory two mirror-flat surfaces perfectly aligned do not need or benefit from thermal compound. However 1000grit paper does not produce a mirror, and screw down GPU+CPU cooler assemblies do not produce perfect alignment. And with a shim there are two interfaces now compared to one before.

    The 1mm size is interesting though . . wow. if the mechanical design (or some mod) creates a gap that big between the cooler and the GPU top when the CPU is down tight then filling 80- 90% % of that gap with Copper shim rather than thermal compound is a good idea (copper is a much better heat conductor) . I cannot see any scientific reason to have a shim otherwise... Many many Laptops do fix the CPU - cooler gap with screws and leave the GPU to take its chances with a thick pad or a non-pressure type thermal compound like akasa pro+ 5022. As there will be variations in the mounting height of the CPU socket and the CPU itself some float somewhere is clearly needed but 1mm sounds like poor engineering practice . . .

    So I think these results nicely demonstrate the rubbish performance of thick thermal pads rather than the best cooling that is possible.

    Also tempted to ask if any compound was (re?) applied to the CPU as that is not remarked on either !
     
  5. chunlianghere

    chunlianghere Notebook Consultant

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    thread updated!

    yes, i do apply thermal compound to both side of copper shim.

    and also, after taking some time to look at the heatsink, it seems that the heatsink is not completely flat.
     
  6. BruBoo

    BruBoo Notebook Evangelist

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    Cool (sorry couldn't resist that)

    The whole idea of 1 cooler on two separate flat topped chips is crazy but the thermal compound usually manages to bridge the gap and make it all work.
    There are some lovely stories of 'another' make of laptops where the gap from cooler to GPU is big enough to insert a coin! No surprise when some of these fail after a while :)
     
  7. g9000z

    g9000z Newbie

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    This is nice, I've tried and success...

    can play dirt2 with medium smoothly without shutting down...

    but still need cooler pad below it..
     
  8. ptrichardson

    ptrichardson Notebook Enthusiast

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    Could anyone tell me if it would be a good idea to do this on my Aspire 7520 Northbridge (GPU)?

    If so, what size would I need?
     
  9. chunlianghere

    chunlianghere Notebook Consultant

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    no point doing it on northbridge..
     
  10. yalcin19

    yalcin19 Notebook Consultant

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  11. weinter

    weinter /dev/null

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  12. yalcin19

    yalcin19 Notebook Consultant

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    Not if you apply the thermal compound properly as I did.:rolleyes:
     
  13. weinter

    weinter /dev/null

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    No serious not every laptop is the same as yours.
    There are some older Acers with a huge gap that can't be filled with paste (1-2 mm).
    Also paste work best when only a thin layer is applied.
     
  14. yalcin19

    yalcin19 Notebook Consultant

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    true different configs. as long as there is no air gaps thickness of layer not much of a problem. (we are not talking about huge thicknesses)
     
  15. Meaker

    Meaker Company Representative

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    paste works best in a thin layer under pressure, that thermal conductivity will drop drasticly in the laptops where the shim mod works well.
     
  16. yalcin19

    yalcin19 Notebook Consultant

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    sure ingenuity works well around here.
    if something has good conductivity in a thin layer, what could be the reason
    for it not to be conductive as well if it is applied thicker?
     
  17. chunlianghere

    chunlianghere Notebook Consultant

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  18. yalcin19

    yalcin19 Notebook Consultant

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    that is viscous enough to do that :D :D :D
     
  19. Meaker

    Meaker Company Representative

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    Thickness is a component in heat transfer, and AFAIK different materials behave differently with different thicknesses.
     
  20. yalcin19

    yalcin19 Notebook Consultant

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    true thickness is a factor in heat transfer calculations and it does play a role in rate of heat transfered.
    Heat transfer rate is also proportional to thermal conductivity, heat transfer area as well as the temperature difference of two points. Like electrical voltage if there is no potential difference between two points there won't be any electrical current.
    So if the temperature difference between two points is so low doesn't matter what you do you won't be able to remove the heat from one point to another.

    So your arrangement might be sufficient enough to remove the heat from GPU and memory chips. But all I was saying was this compound has much better thermal conductivity so the result will be higher heat transfer rates provided that there is enough temperature difference between the two points. Meaning you may be able to transfer heat from one point to another so quickly but if you can't cool the second material quick enough, the temperature difference will be ~0 then from that point onwards you won't be able to remove any heat from GPU.

    The bottom line is everything needs to be balanced (ambient temp,cooling fans speed, number of fins, area of fins, the length of copper arm and etc.) and your arrangement may be sufficient.

    Since we don't know all the variables and factors involved, nothing is certain and it becomes a trial and error. The only way to find out which way is better is to try out each config on the same PC and check the temperature changes that's all.
     

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