Conductonaut vs coollaboratory liquid pro

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by Danishblunt, Nov 2, 2017.

  1. Danishblunt

    Danishblunt Notebook Virtuoso

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    So I was wondering if there is any difference? As far as I heard and read, it seems that conductonaut is "cleaner" than the liquid pro, it doesn't leave residue etc. Is that correct? My main gripe with clp is that it is somewhat annoying to clean off, so if conductonaut doesn't suffer from this, that'd be a clear buy from me.
     
  2. aziraphaleUK

    aziraphaleUK Notebook Consultant

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    I found Conductonaut easier to work with the Liquid Pro. Conductonaut for me was easier to remove than LP but both left some stains on the copper heatsinks, Conductonaut not as much as LP thou. But they are basically the same product with different metal mixes.
     
  3. runix18

    runix18 Notebook Enthusiast

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    Tested them both, and both leave heavy residue on the copper sink and also on the silicon chip itself after a while.
     
  4. jclausius

    jclausius Notebook Virtuoso

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    Supposedly some very low grade HCl can remove the stains... In the US, I think you can get that at a hardware store - they use it to clean bricks.

    Please research this some more, as I've never tried it, but recall seeing it mentioned in cleaning off gallinstan oxidation - mentioned by der8auer
     
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  5. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    3000 grit sandpaper + Isopropyl Alcohol can remove the stains too :)
    The stains are only superficial. Not even 0.1mm into the surface, as long as the heatsink has a *GOOD SOLID* fit, without gaps or convex problems, meaning that when you remove the heatsink, most of the liquid metal is still liquid :)
    The hard part is when the heatsink has bad fit and the liquid metal actually hardens completely. In those horrible instances when you remove the heatsink, there is NO liquid metal at all on the CPU! Just a faint film! It's all attached to the heatsink and hardened. Then all of the gallium is absorbed basically due to the horrible fit and air pockets and bad pressure but you can still remove all of it with 3000 grit sandpaper and 91% alcohol+.
     
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  6. Papusan

    Papusan JOKEBOOKS = That sucks! Dont wast your $$ on FILTH

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    And don’t remove all if you reapply new Liquid metal. Only make sure that the heatsink cold plate has even - flat surface. Second time will last longer.
     
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  7. Falkentyne

    Falkentyne Notebook Prophet

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    Yes this is excellent advice from Papusan
    The Gallium - Copper connection has some sort of battery effect (someone posted the numbers) where a certain amount of gallium gets absorbed into the skin (outermost layer, less than 0.1mm) of the copper, until the differential reaches 0.0. Gallium is the part of liquid metal that keeps the alloy liquid to begin with, otherwise the Tin and Iridium (or is it indium) would just become solid again at room temperature. I believe Gallium itself melts at 30C.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gallium

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galinstan

    I don't know why low pressure + oxygen increases the battery effect of gallium being absorbed into the copper. If you leave galinstan drop exposed to air for 6 months, it will just sit there smiling at you nice and liquid...except it will get dirty thanks to dust but that's it. But if you have a solid heatsink fit and seal it so air doesn't get in, some of the gallium will be absorbed, and part of the remaining alloy will harden, but enough will remain liquid. Then if the pressure is good and the battery effect stops, the hardened part will just be a thin layer and thanks to the even pressure, will still happily transfer heat.

    That's why leaving the stain is important; just remove the hardened stuff (this reduces contact and causes bad hot spots), because if the stain is left, there is less of a battery effect on the remaining liquid metal. That's why if you remove the old liquid metal but keep all of the absorbed gallium and reapply, most of the new coat will remain and then you won't have to repaste anymore.

    http://forum.notebookreview.com/thr...-compatibility-with-copper-heat-sinks.800890/
     
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  8. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    I've noticed larger differences in batch qualities with coollaboritory, I had syringes that were the consistency of water inside and were useless yet nothing like that with conductonaught.
     
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