Computer Science Major? Discussion of Major and Outlook of Jobs in 2011

Discussion in 'Programming and Homework Questions' started by postman, Nov 29, 2011.

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  1. masterchef341

    masterchef341 The guy from The Notebook

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    Just to answer the questions:

    1. Hard major? Compared to the average major, yes. Compared to majors which provide similar expected incomes, it's about middle of the road. Also heavily dependent on how well you connect with the material, and how interesting it is to you (ie. how much you will invest yourself into the material)

    2. Gets harder as you go through degree, but depends on the institution I suppose. Advanced CS classes can be complex.

    3. Economic outlook is very positive for CS.
     
  2. Geekz

    Geekz Notebook Deity

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    not to disrespect, but my point was to answer the question of the OP as to the job prospects for a computer science major.

    at the end of the day it would still depend on the industry you'll be working for, I doubt any college or university that I could've attended to would get you a job if this is the job posting for a .net developer in a software dev company which is standard nowadays.

    Requires B.S. Comsci degree
    Requires .net framework 3.5 experience
    requires experience on the following WCF, web services, Ajax, Sql server 2005
    familiarity with MVP design pattern.

    good thing though my crappy college prepared me to learn the fundamentals of programming and RDBMS and to learn how to adapt to new technologies and see the trend.

    and yep, half of what I learned in college I don't use anymore while working in the business sector developing software for insurance companies and the like.


    Just my 0.02f cents. ;)
     
  3. Teraforce

    Teraforce Flying through life

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    Holy crap why didn't I see this thread before?!

    I graduated last May with a CS degree, and I'm still looking for a job. Contacted several companies a few months ago, but I haven't heard back yet :( And then I got busy with other stuff, so I haven't had time to job search as much....
     
  4. masterchef341

    masterchef341 The guy from The Notebook

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    I'm sure someone who is investing 100% of themselves into getting a job with a CS degree should be able to find one.
     
  5. tiko2020

    tiko2020 Notebook Consultant

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    I would suggest to train yourself well and can look for part-time jobs from home, give it a try at vWorker.com: How work gets done. Guaranteed! or http://www.odesk.com

    Build a strong profile on LinkedIn and add the right contacts (e.g. recruiters), I received many jobs from LinkedIn.
     
  6. redrazor11

    redrazor11 Formerly waterwizard11

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    I thought this was common knowldge: "Don't have a job, then job-hunting is you full time job"
     
  7. postman

    postman Notebook Guru

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    wow, interesting i only completed intro to cpp and started the second level course problem solving with cpp, what got me lost were the "8 queens or n queens on a chessboard problem". Certainly knew by that time this major was pretty math intensive, most of it involving algebra and logic.

    Wanted to ask I read or heard somewhere that there might be age discrimination? usually software engineers are under their 30's and those above 30 usually get management type jobs. is this right or true? I certainly dont want to be im my 50-60's getting laid off simply because Im too old.

    About the college do you believe that public or private is better for CS?
    Lastly, whats with the outsourcing/offshoring hysteria? Does it affect us now and in the future or not much?

    ouch sorry to hear that, try obtaining a masters if you can. I hear that if you also obtain business knowledge or getting an mba can increase your chances. certain CS employers like to see a person who can not only code and problemsolve, but also be able to manage. maybe, thats what i heard.
     
  8. redrazor11

    redrazor11 Formerly waterwizard11

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    I really dislike the way these sites are laid out. During my entire CS Career we were always led to believe we'd be rock-stars, making a good wage with our degrees.

    Then I look on here and see garbage low-balling projects for $3.99 an hour on something that involve solving a NP complete problem, or creating a website that has a checkout system with back-end database.

    The worst part is...there's like 30 bids on them!! :eek:

    Are we really only worth ******* $4 an hour? :(
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2015
  9. Kyle

    Kyle JVC SZ2000 Dual-Driver Headphones

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    The fairytale:
    http://i.imgur.com/ihfPV.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2015
  10. masterchef341

    masterchef341 The guy from The Notebook

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    Those types of jobs don't require a CS degree. Anyone who has taken a single 3 hour programming course, has a little bit of time to spare, and knows how to use wikipedia and google can crank that type of thing out pretty quickly.

    A CS degree would be much more valuable if put towards working on a project where the scope of the project is larger, more complex, and necessitates working with a group. In that case, you have to be able to communicate ideas to other people, and understand what other people are trying to communicate to you. Without a moderate amount of formal training, that type of interaction would be very labor intensive on its own. Companies who need to organize teams of programmers would pay much better than someone looking for a simple programming assignment to be done because they require a higher level of specialization and expertise than Joe Schmoe who wants a NP-complete problem-solver.

    Programming out a solution to a NP-complete problem is not hard. In fact, it's such a well explored domain that it's already done for you in many places on the internet. You won't be able to get a polynomial time exact solution, but you can produce an approximation, and all the CS work is already done for you. You select an approximation which is appropriate and code it out. A checkout system with a database is also a very well explored and solved problem. It's barely computer science, it's just programming at that point. Maybe it would fall under the category of simple software engineering.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 8, 2015
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