College Laptop/ Video Editing

Discussion in 'What Notebook Should I Buy?' started by Billmeister, Jun 12, 2016.

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  1. Billmeister

    Billmeister Newbie

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    I'm going off to college and I need a laptop that I can use as a personal computer and to edit videos. The kind of video editing I do is pretty light, I use adobe premiere elements 11 and I don't do any special effects or anything. I just need a computer that won't crap out on me and can get the job done.

    General Questions

    1) What is your budget?
    $800

    2) What size notebook would you prefer?
    c. Thin and Light; 13" - 14" screen
    d. Mainstream; 15" - 16" screen

    3) Where will you buying this notebook? You can select the flag of your country as an indicator.
    United States (California)

    4) Are there any brands that you prefer or any you really don't like?
    I have never used an apple computer but I could learn if I need to.
    5) Would you consider laptops that are refurbished/redistributed?
    Yes

    6) What are the primary tasks will you be performing with this notebook?
    Editing Video, College Stuff

    7) Will you be taking the notebook with you to different places, leaving it on your desk or both?
    Both

    8) Will you be playing games on your notebook? If so, please state which games or types of games?
    Civ 5

    9) How many hours of battery life do you need?
    Probably six hours so that I don't have to charge between classes or anything.

    10) Would you prefer to see the notebooks you're considering before purchasing it or buying a notebook on-line without seeing it is OK?
    Online is okay.

    11) What OS do you prefer? Windows (Windows 7 / 8), Mac OS, Linux, etc.
    Windows because its all I've ever used.

    Screen Specifics

    12) From the choices below, what screen resolution(s) would you prefer? Keep in mind screen size in conjunction with resolution will play a large role in overall viewing comfort level. Everyone is different. Some like really small text, while others like their text big and easy to read. (Scroll down to see screen resolution information.)
    I don't care as long as it's not terrible.
    13) Do you want a glossy/reflective screen or a matte/non-glossy screen? (Scroll down to see explanations.)
    Glossy please.
    Build Quality and Design

    14) Are the notebook's looks and stylishness important to you?
    No.
    15) When are you buying this laptop?
    ASAP.

    16) How long do you want this laptop to last?
    At least for four years but I'm probably going to be using it for a long time after college.

    Notebook Components

    17) How much hard drive space do you need? Do you want a SSD drive?
    I need a sizable drive to store video. I don't know a lot about SSD's but I hear they are very fast and reliable so that would be cool.

    18) Do you need an optical drive? If yes, a DVD Burner, Blu-ray Reader or Blu-Ray Burner?
    No.
    ==========
    P.S. The cheaper the better but I do not want something that will quit on me in the first couple of months. I just don't want a lot of the extra stuff since video editing is the only strenuous task the laptop will have to deal with.
     
  2. DRFP

    DRFP Notebook Evangelist

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  3. Kent T

    Kent T Notebook Virtuoso

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    Not a good college laptop. Fair build quality, not durable for more than 2-3 years (if you baby it to extremes). The only HP laptops I regard as recommendable are EliteBooks or ZBook workstations for durability, for support which is fast, and for good warranties with accidental damage coverage, those machines will last 4-6 years.
     
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  4. Billmeister

    Billmeister Newbie

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  5. Jarhead

    Jarhead 恋の♡アカサタナ

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    Another laptop I wouldn't trust to survive a career in college.

    I'd look into business-class laptops instead if you're looking for something to last you 4+ years. Something like a Lenovo Thinkpad, HP Elitebook, or Dell Latitude would be a more appropriate range of choices to look at.
     
  6. Billmeister

    Billmeister Newbie

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  7. Kent T

    Kent T Notebook Virtuoso

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    A good choice, but for video editing, a Discrete GPU would be recommended.
     
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  8. DRFP

    DRFP Notebook Evangelist

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    I read posts like this and I really question them on several levels:
    Hardware is designed for average lifetime of at least 5 years, some fail sooner no matter how much you spend most times, of course there are exceptions.

    I started owning PCs back in the early 80's, bought laptops when they were "lunch boxes" (086) and since. By no means am I know all or be all but HP, ASUS, ACER and Dell have had lemons and quality issues at times, and they have had awesome design latops as well. Currently I have 1 Pavillion x360 and 2 Specters, 4 Dell 15 Inspirons, all touch screens all bought in the past 4 moths at the Office and I like the HPs better than the dells in size and out of the box performance. We put our laptops through a lot, we are a Family Medicine Clinic opened 7 days a week at least 8 hours a day, some more. We use our laptops to access our EMR and to surf for articles. I take my x360 everywhere and use it daily for the past 2+ months and its doing great. This is my 4th HP and so far not one has given me problems ( knock on wood) and I put my laptops through H$LL

    While I like the specs of Lenovo, I hated my wifes old Lenovo, it ran OK but iit felt cheap, and many models are just plain UGLY.

    So I feel some people are just plain biased, I will be honest, I have an ACER I bought and I like it because it runs and its cheap but I do not like ACER usually, I had one dud once and I understand the bias.
     
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  9. z31fanatic

    z31fanatic Notebook Consultant

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    Not bad but the screen being 12.5" may be too small for you, no?

    Here is a Dell Latitude E7470 (latest model) 14" ultrabook for $919 - 35% off with the coupon code spo35Latitude = $597 (plus tax obviously).

    http://outlet.us.dell.com/ARBOnlineSales/Online/SecondaryInventorySearch.aspx?c=us&l=en&s=dfb&cs=28&key=MEe8qbZL8CLw02O90QoBIYcDxQDaVDidu0MYEb0D4ak=&puid=b2e7a41b

    Or another one with i7 and 256GB SSD for $1,129 - 35% = $734
    http://outlet.us.dell.com/ARBOnline...2O90QoBIYcDxQDaVDidu0MYEb0D4ak=&puid=77e71370
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2016
  10. Kent T

    Kent T Notebook Virtuoso

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    In the 1980's through the late 1990's laptops were mostly business oriented, and some sold to writers, and college students. Those machines then were much more expensive and built with longevity in mind. In today's world, too many consumer grade laptops are 2-3 year lifespan machines unless treated with severe kid gloves. Support and warranty on consumer machines is depot and often takes anywhere from 2 weeks to 8 weeks to get done. In a college setting, that is NOT ACCEPTABLE when there's work to be done and GPA dependent on that machine running. HP Pavillions keep me in spare recreational cash, as many of them suffer from AC charger jack issues, screen hinges that are loose, and keyboards in need of replacement. That's average family consumer users. Dell Inspirons are anywhere from that bad to decent, depending on model. I have had good and bad Inspirons. Acers are decent to a point too, do see the keyboard replacements and loose screen hinges more than any other problems. Your EMR laptops don't likely travel to work every day, in my main job as broadcast engineer, our sales people, the engineers I manage and I our machines spend a lot of time away from the office. And with physically challenged staffers, I see how durable machines really are including spastic me. So, be mindful of where I come from. Consumer grade machines used to be better built 6-9 years ago than they are today in critical areas.
     
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