Clevo w650kk1 - Display swap & gsync?

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by FrizzleFry, Oct 5, 2018.

  1. Danishblunt

    Danishblunt Guest

    Reputations:
    0
    Maybe @t456 can help you with that.
     
    FrizzleFry and sicily428 like this.
  2. FrizzleFry

    FrizzleFry Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    That would be amazing! So @t456 , whenever you got a little time, it would be greatly appreciated, if you could give some feedback on this.

    To sum up the situation again,
    I'm trying to get brightness control to work with the B156HTN05.1 that I installed in my Clevo branded w650kk1.
     
  3. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC Moderator

    Reputations:
    1,846
    Messages:
    2,513
    Likes Received:
    1,916
    Trophy Points:
    181
    Posted some background info in the Laptop Screen Upgrades thread.

    This system, like most Clevos, supports a wide variety of different panels by design. The advantage is that it can also detect quite a few of them and use different pwm ranges to control their backlight. The HTN05.1 is not part of that list and the default range is clearly incompatible. If we had the edids of the 05.1 and the official panels (copy/paste the ' Raw data' bit in MonInfo) then we could find out which is the best match for the 05.1, use CRU to mimic it and, hopefully, bring back brightness control by forcing the laptop to use a different pwm range.

    W650KK1 panels:
    • B156HTN03.8
    • LP156WF6-SPK1
    • LP156WF6-SPK3
    • LTN156AT39-HT01
    • N156HGE-EAB
    • NT156FHM-N41
    It's also possible to control the backlight directly, but that needs soldering. Some of my systems have quite a bit of empty space left, so I'll see whether I can make a more-or-less unobtrusive mod. Direct control is guaranteed to work, regardless of panel type, (v)bios, drivers or os. It's really what all desktop monitors support out of the box.
     
  4. FrizzleFry

    FrizzleFry Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Thanks for your reply. I read through the post you linked, but tbh alot of that went over my head.

    I did however load up MonInfo and copied the info for both, the original LG panel and the replacement AUO panel:

    Monitor
    Windows description...... Generic PnP Monitor
    Manufacturer............. LG Display
    Plug and Play ID......... LGD0533
    Data string.............. LP156WF6-SPK3
    Serial number............ n/a
    Manufacture date......... 2016, ISO week 0
    Filter driver............ None
    -------------------------
    EDID revision............ 1.4
    Input signal type........ Digital (DisplayPort)
    Color bit depth.......... 6 bits per primary color
    Color encoding formats... RGB 4:4:4, YCrCb 4:4:4
    Screen size.............. 340 x 190 mm (15,3 in)
    Power management......... Standby, Suspend, Active off/sleep
    Extension blocs.......... None
    -------------------------
    DDC/CI................... n/a

    Color characteristics
    Default color space...... Non-sRGB
    Display gamma............ 2,20
    Red chromaticity......... Rx 0,580 - Ry 0,350
    Green chromaticity....... Gx 0,340 - Gy 0,560
    Blue chromaticity........ Bx 0,155 - By 0,125
    White point (default).... Wx 0,313 - Wy 0,329
    Additional descriptors... None

    Timing characteristics
    Range limits............. Not available
    GTF standard............. Not supported
    Additional descriptors... None
    Preferred timing......... Yes
    Native/preferred timing.. 1920x1080p at 60Hz
    Modeline............... "1920x1080" 138,700 1920 1968 2000 2080 1080 1083 1088 1111 +hsync -vsync

    Standard timings supported

    Report information
    Date generated........... 14.10.2018
    Software revision........ 2.90.0.1020
    Data source.............. Registry-Active
    Operating system......... 10.0.17134.2

    Raw data
    00,FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,00,30,E4,33,05,00,00,00,00,00,1A,01,04,95,22,13,78,EA,A1,C5,94,59,57,8F,27,
    20,50,54,00,00,00,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,2E,36,80,A0,70,38,1F,40,30,20,
    35,00,58,C2,10,00,00,1A,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,FE,00,4C,
    47,20,44,69,73,70,6C,61,79,0A,20,20,00,00,00,FE,00,4C,50,31,35,36,57,46,36,2D,53,50,4B,33,00,BF

    Monitor
    Windows description...... Generic PnP Monitor
    Manufacturer............. AUO
    Plug and Play ID......... AUO51ED
    Data string.............. HPJGK€B156HTN [*CP437]
    Serial number............ -111847105
    Manufacture date......... 2016, ISO week 28
    Filter driver............ None
    -------------------------
    EDID revision............ 1.4
    Input signal type........ Digital (DisplayPort)
    Color bit depth.......... 8 bits per primary color
    Color encoding formats... RGB 4:4:4
    Screen size.............. 340 x 190 mm (15,3 in)
    Power management......... Not supported
    Extension blocs.......... None
    -------------------------
    DDC/CI................... n/a

    Color characteristics
    Default color space...... Non-sRGB
    Display gamma............ 2,20
    Red chromaticity......... Rx 0,635 - Ry 0,345
    Green chromaticity....... Gx 0,329 - Gy 0,623
    Blue chromaticity........ Bx 0,154 - By 0,055
    White point (default).... Wx 0,313 - Wy 0,329
    Additional descriptors... None

    Timing characteristics
    Range limits............. Not available
    GTF standard............. Not supported
    Additional descriptors... None
    Preferred timing......... Yes
    Native/preferred timing.. 1920x1080p at 120Hz (16:9)
    Modeline............... "1920x1080" 290,800 1920 2028 2076 2120 1080 1090 1100 1142 +hsync -vsync
    Detailed timing #1....... 1920x1080p at 60Hz (16:9)
    Modeline............... "1920x1080" 290,800 1920 2028 2076 2120 1080 1090 1100 2284 +hsync -vsync

    Standard timings supported

    Report information
    Date generated........... 14.10.2018
    Software revision........ 2.90.0.1020
    Data source.............. Registry
    Operating system......... 10.0.17134.2

    Raw data
    00,FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,FF,00,06,AF,ED,51,3F,59,55,F9,1C,1A,01,04,A5,22,13,78,02,96,85,A2,58,54,9F,27,
    0E,50,54,00,00,00,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,01,98,71,80,C8,70,38,3E,40,6C,30,
    AA,00,58,C1,10,00,00,1A,98,71,80,C8,70,38,B4,44,6C,30,AA,00,58,C1,10,00,00,1A,00,00,00,FE,00,48,
    50,4A,47,4B,80,42,31,35,36,48,54,4E,00,00,00,00,00,02,81,02,A8,00,11,00,00,0B,01,0A,20,20,00,E5

    If there's a solution that doesn't require soldering, that would definitely be prefered. My soldering skills are quite limited :D
     
  5. FrizzleFry

    FrizzleFry Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    @t456
    i tried to understand the CRU method a bit more.
    From the list of panels, that you mentioned were used in the w650kk1, the B156HTN03.8 stood out to me, as it is an AUO panel,
    just like the B156HTN05.1 im trying to get working.
    From my layman's perspective, this could mean, that pwm is used the same way on both panels and that it might be a good start.
    I've found this EDID repository, which seems to have some RAW data, although i dont understand why there's different data for the same panel.

    I have also used CRU to export data in every possible format for my original LG panel, aswell as the replacement AUO panel and tried to make some sense of it.

    To be honest though, i'm not sure what the next step would be.
    If you could provide some guidance to what data i should use as a base and what parts i should edit, that would be awesome!
     
  6. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

    Reputations:
    8,115
    Messages:
    51,333
    Likes Received:
    14,643
    Trophy Points:
    931
    It's not certain to use the same pwm range. Different models could be intended for other device types.
     
    FrizzleFry likes this.
  7. t456

    t456 1977-09-05, 12:56:00 UTC Moderator

    Reputations:
    1,846
    Messages:
    2,513
    Likes Received:
    1,916
    Trophy Points:
    181
    No, it's like Meaker said; all manufacturers can use any range. It just depends on the type of display design.
    Revisions, usually. Also; Dell and Lenovo order customised edids for their large purchases, so the same panel can have a number of different edids. Lenovo even rebrands the plug-and-play id, so an AUO B156HTN03.5 has either a (supposedly unique) id of AUO35ED or is branded LEN40B4 (same panel, except bought by Lenovo). Dell does something similar except by using a simple, optional text block. And aside from adding their inventory part nrs. they always use different colour calibration settings for 'their' panels for some unfathomable reason or another.
    It's pretty simple. Open CRU and use the 'edit' button to change the current AUO panel's 'Product ID' from AUO51ED to LGD0533, click 'OK' and hit the 'restart.exe' in the CRU folder next. An edid override copy will be created in the registry and with the graphics driver restart it will be informed that the override is the currently active panel.

    You're only changing the ID, but not any of the panel's parameters. That should still give you 120 Hz, except this time we're hoping that the valid ID will be recognised and the system will use a pwm range that is compatible with the AUO. A system reboot may be required. If the LGD0533 ID doesn't work then try AUO38ED (the 03.8), LGD04A7 (SPK1), SDC4E51 (HT01?), CMN15C4 (EAB) or BOE06BA (N41). It'd be easier if we had specification sheets for all these panels since the trial-and-error wouldn't be necessary then, but alas; they're either unavailable, unfindable or behind Panelook's P-Coin system.

    Don't get overly high hopes though. It's only registry editing after all and the driver (through the vbios) is more likely to poll the panel directly, getting the info straight from the eeprom. At least it's harmless to try and it's hardly as invasive as eeprom programming or finicky soldering jobs.

    Btw, it's also possible to use a complete edid override rather than just the ID bit. That would be necessary for Lenovo whitelisting, but Clevo has never been caught deliberately frustrating their end users by nefarious means and full-edid checking would need far more administration in order to tackle every possible edid revision. If your intent is merely to lookup a desired pwm control range for the installed panel then the pnp id is the perfect, most minimalistic bit of information for the job. They do validate g-sync panels with a full-edid compare, but that's only because Nvidia demands this from every g-sync laptop supplier. Otherwise there'd be no way to distinguish no-fee panels from the exact same panels that have been paid a premium for.
     
    FrizzleFry likes this.
  8. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

    Reputations:
    8,115
    Messages:
    51,333
    Likes Received:
    14,643
    Trophy Points:
    931
    Apple have their own IDs too which could lock out the system even if it's the same model.
     
    t456 likes this.
  9. FrizzleFry

    FrizzleFry Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Thank you so much for the in depht explanation! Very informative.

    I will get to testing and try not to get my hopes up too much. I Iill definitely come back with results.

    Again thanks for taking the time to educate me.
     
  10. FrizzleFry

    FrizzleFry Newbie

    Reputations:
    0
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    1
    Trophy Points:
    6
    Unfortunately non of the IDs made any difference.
    Now since I'm not comfortable with doings any hardware modifications and from what I understand, modifying the eeprom itself would require a flashing tool of some sorts, I'm ready to put this project to rest.

    It was a fun ride and I learned a lot along the way.

    Thanks for everyone who chimed in and helped me. I think this is a great forum and I will definitely stick around.
     
Loading...

Share This Page