Clevo p775dm3-g - graphics card dead, what now?

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by jimmi101, Mar 20, 2021.

  1. jimmi101

    jimmi101 Newbie

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    I am sorry to hear that Harvey! I know how this must feel. :(
    Did you have some symptops that showed, what was coming? I had some random black screens the days before, untill a sudden shutdown finished the graphics card off for good. Maybe reflux or reballing might fix your card and is worth a try?
    At the moment I tend to letting the specialist in my town give reballing a try. If it does not work I will try to land a good deal on a 1060 or 1070. 1080 seems too expensive.

    As far as i understand it now, the reason for connection issues on flip chip GPUs might either be a broken BGA (2nd lvl interconnection in picture below) connection, or a broken microBGA connection (1st lvl interconnection in picture below, (the motherboard would be the mxm pcb in case of a Clevo-Laptop)).

    [​IMG]
    Reballing refers to the resodering of just the 2nd lvl as far as I know. So if the damaged connection is there, it might be fixed. But if the 1st lvl is broken, reballing will not directly help, but the applied heat during the process might actualling fix the connections on the first level too, if one gets lucky. But the fix might not last long in this case, according to what I read. Also some peaple claim, like Rossman, that the problem is usually in the first lvl, hence his objection to reballing, I guess.
     
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  2. Khenglish

    Khenglish Notebook Deity

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    Oh the need for reball is absolutely mostly initial design error. AMD had an idiotic trend of making the memory solder pads smaller than the other pads, but then using the same size solder ball everywhere. This always resulted in weaker RAM connections. This used to be ok because the corners, the areas of the most physical stress would have full size sacrificial GND pads to hold the solder rigid, but they stopped doing that with HD 6000 and newer cards and started getting major reliability issues.

    As for why mobile GPUs have a high failure rate, I'd say it's because particularly lately Clevo for example only has 4 screws on the GPU heatsink just for the GPU core. This means any physical stress on the heatsink channels straight to the GPU core solder. This is particularly problematic on the large, heavy unified heatsink designs. Not only is the heatsink heavy, but any misalignment results in greatly increased strain on the GPU, and getting a CPU and GPU of different heights to screw to a unified heatsink always results in slightly off angles, slight misalignments, and major solder strain. This flexes pcbs over time for ever more strain, and eventually things break. For high power systems don't use unified heatsinks, and you need more screws other than screws for the core to get the weight of the heatsink off of it.

    While some designs are more prone to failure, that doesn't say that a reball doesn't fix the issue. If you break solder you have to resolder it. There is no conspiracy theory internal clock to fake that the device is dying.
     
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  3. Khenglish

    Khenglish Notebook Deity

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    The first level does often have issues. You can't get flux on it, so even if you do get a broken connection there to resolder, it's probably a weak resolder.

    In general 1080 cards are not prone to failure, but Clevos are due to the issue I mentioned above. In Clevo's case you more likely have broken 2nd level, which is very fixable. If you check your card for bending from the side, you can probably see where the area of the core is pulled upward, which is from the heatsink pulling down on it when it is in its normal upside-down position when running. For the 20 series they switched to separate CPU and GPU heatsinks to prevent this from happening as severely.
     
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  4. jimmi101

    jimmi101 Newbie

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    I see, that does make sense! I am getting my hopes up a little, that a reball might actually do the trick and my Clevo runs happily ever after! :)
    My guy can do the job on wednesday, I will keep you updated on how it turns out!
     
  5. HarveySee

    HarveySee Newbie

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    It was switching itself off while I was playing 1 game specifically: X4 Foundations... yes, I know, I'm a massive nerd that likes space. These weren't your normal crashes, it was even causing the power-brick to switch off, necessitating plugging it back on. Then, while in X4 again, the whole system hung, sound went mental, screen showed white frozen static. Could only switch it off by long-pressing the power button. Once I turned it back on again, it started showing the same static as yours.

    I'm done with it. While it's served me well around the world, I've never been 100% enamoured with it. If anyone on here wants my P775DM3-G for parts, spares, etc, PM me.

    I bought a Gigabyte AORUS 15P-XC today and so far it's a big step up.
     
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  6. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    The move to lead free solder and not getting it quite right scuppered a wave of Nvidia chips too. Again on that first level.
     
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  7. jimmi101

    jimmi101 Newbie

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    I see, I would be happy, if you could let us know, how the parting out goes. ;)

    Is it maybe also possible to resoder the first level?
     
  8. Khenglish

    Khenglish Notebook Deity

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    Oh the initial move to lead free caused so many issues. On early 2000s ram you can pry off the memory chips from the modules without desoldering the chips and the pads would be undamaged. When delidding a P4 the TIM was caked on so hard that it was stronger than the solder, and the core ripped off.
     
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  9. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    Yeah, the package is not supposed to be a socket :p still caused issues with the apple Nvidia chips especially thanks to thermals.
     
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  10. Meaker@Sager

    Meaker@Sager Company Representative

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    Not without fab level equipment.
     
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