Clevo P157SM-A 880m to MSI 1070 upgrade

Discussion in 'Sager and Clevo' started by donovan20055, Jul 16, 2018.

  1. donovan20055

    donovan20055 Notebook Enthusiast

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    I upgraded my Clevo P157SM-A graphics card to a MSI 1070 finally got tired of the 880m GTX.
    Here are the 3DMark 11 after and before pics I ran the 1070 with +200 core clock then with +220 core +100 mem in MSI afterburner (The 115W power limit is my bottleneck). When playing games I have to lock the voltage to 800mV due to power limit with core at 1506MHz. The 880m GTX picture is from 2014 at that time I had IC diamond thermal paste which I later replaced with Kryonaut then Conductonaut liquid metal.
    3DMark 11 benchmark scores.
    Fire Strike score after modding vBios to 140W power limit and raising boost throttle temp from 54C to 91C with Core +189/Mem +520. Fire Strike Score

    The card I got was a MSI 1070 MXM 3.1 hardware rev 1.2 with SLI connector missing/removed from eBay.
    I had to remove some of the bottom case like in this example picture. What I did is in the second link.
    The heatsink required a little work but if you test fit it'll be pretty easy to figure out. I used liquid metal since I was concerned about heat but so far the temps are better than the 880m which also used liquid metal, don't forget to protect the GPU chip with Super 33+ electrical tape or something similar. When I was doing 3DMark 11 benchmarks I didn't exceed 70C. Idle temp is 35C and after running Mass effect Andromeda with maxed out settings in 1080p for an hour at 800mV (core clock dropped from 1506 to 1493 at either 70/72C) temps didn't go over 80C with a 24C ambient at 80% fan.
    GPU-Z pictures.
    Operating system is Windows 10 64bit with UEFI enabled, bios is Prema Bios 1.03.11PM v2. Also tested with Bios/EC 1.03.03, Bios 1.03.05, EC 1.03.06, Bios 1.03.08, EC 1.03.07, Bios 1.03.09, Bios 1.03.11, EC 1.03.08 and Eurocom Bios/EC 1.05.01. BIOS/EC 1.03.03 gave me the best GPU performance while Prema Bios 1.03.11PM v2 has better CPU performance but is power draw capped at 216W (188W with 87% efficient AC adapter).
    When installing Nvidia driver 398.36 (also works with 399.24) I had to copy and modify this line
    %NVIDIA_DEV.1BE1.65A3.1558% = Section086, PCI\VEN_10DE&DEV_1BE1&SUBSYS_65A31558
    to this
    %NVIDIA_DEV.1BE1.5281.1558% = Section086, PCI\VEN_10DE&DEV_1BE1&SUBSYS_52811558
    along with adding
    NVIDIA_DEV.1BE1.5281.1558 = "NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070"
    to the [Strings] section of the nvcvi.inf file.
    I think the line I used was for the Clevo P650HS maybe?
    I had to reinstall the driver and change the Section number 4 times I believe before I found one that worked with this card. You can try using Section046 which also worked.
    Pictures of modding driver INF file, make sure you know the hardware ID of your card.
    Picture of everything else that came with card.
    Some interesting things to note:
    Bios doesn't show card just says "Unknown" it does however display the GPU vBios 86.04.42.00.04.
    1070 uses slightly less power (maybe 5 watts less) at 800mV/1506MHz full load than 880m did under full load.
    Kill a Watt power meter showed that I could use a 180W AC adapter assuming I don't try to run CPU at full load with turbo on or overclock GPU (which I can't at the moment due to power limit) and limit number of active hard drives. Increasing core/mem with MSI Afterburner didn't increase GPU power usage.

    Adding pictures to show what happens when MSI 1070 115W power limit is reached, core clock fluctuates due to reaching limit. GPU-Z doesn't show it but voltage dropped to 756mV.
    Kill a Watt power meter showed power draw from wall was between 185-190W.
    Adding pictures of torture test. Max temp was 85C with 100% fan at 30C ambient. Due to power limit voltage dropped from 800mV to 756mV and core clock fluctuated between 1250Mhz and 1443MHz.
    After some more testing I've decided to use 800mV with core at 1481MHz(-24MHz) on MSI Afterburner. When I lock it at that setting voltage drops to 792mV which is the lowest value I can currently lock at. Lowering it further had no effect. At the moment I don't plan on raising power limit since I'm happy enough with the performance but that may change given enough time. When I ran a 3DMark 11 benchmark I got a graphics performance score of 21500.
    After modding vBios by increasing power limit to 140W and changing boost throttle temp from 54C to 91C I don't need to do this anymore.
    MSI Afterburner 4.6.0 beta 10 has a larger voltage range starting at 700mV up to 1250mV if you need to lock voltage. OC Scanner suggested I run at +132 core average.

    Thanks to the information I've found/read on this forum and other places I was able to do this with minimal difficulty.
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2019
    krzyzakpl, Borost, joluke and 3 others like this.
  2. Danishblunt

    Danishblunt Guest

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    Could you post your 3dmark benchmarks?
     
  3. johnbb

    johnbb Notebook Consultant

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    Good job !
     
  4. Ragib Zaman

    Ragib Zaman Notebook Enthusiast

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    I've thinking about ordering a GTX 1070 off ebay for my P157SM and want to do the same thing you have done. I was just hoping if you could shed some light on the heatsink:

    "The heatsink required a little work but if you test fit it'll be pretty easy to figure out."
    What exactly did you mean by this? Did you use the heatsink that originally came with your laptop, or did you buy a special heatsink your new card and install that? I do see at this Eurocom page it states that for a GTX 1070 86x105mm MXM 3.1 (like the one you bought) a special heatsink is required:

    "GTX 1070 card has been fully tested and working. You will need to purchase a modified heatsink for this to function."
    Is this really required?
     
  5. donovan20055

    donovan20055 Notebook Enthusiast

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    It isn't required they just do most of the needed work for you, such as making sure the thermal pads are in the right spots, making sure the thermal pads are the right thickness and making sure the heatsink will fit properly over the VRAM. Thermal pad thickness varies between .5mm to 2mm in the VRAM area.
    It would help to add a picture of your heatsink since more than one type could be used.
    The one I had was a one piece heatsink for both the GPU die and VRAM.
    Like in this hyperlink.
    [​IMG]
    They also can be two piece one part goes on the GPU die while another piece goes over the VRAM.
    [​IMG]
    The part that goes on the GPU die fits fine just make sure the white tab that is used to remove the heatsink doesn't get in the way, keep in mind my heatsink was one piece not two.
    Test fitting was for the section that goes over the VRAM since the components are different in that area when compared to a 880M/980M. Got to make sure the thermal pads are contacting the MOSFETs, inductors and memory chips. While test fitting you may need to sand/remove some material from the aluminum section that goes over the MOSFETs, inductors and memory chips. Sanding/removing only applies to the two areas in the picture below.
    Hopefully this was helpful
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2018
    krzyzakpl and Ragib Zaman like this.
  6. Ragib Zaman

    Ragib Zaman Notebook Enthusiast

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    Thank you so much, your explanations and labelled pictures are incredibly helpful. I don't have my screwdriver set on me to take a picture right now, but I'm fairly certain from the last time I repasted my CPU/GPU that I have the 1-piece GPU heatsink like you do. So it indeed appears that as long as I can fiddle with some aluminium in the case then I don't have to purchase a special modified heatsink. When my GPU arrives I'll be following what your post very closely. Again, thanks so much for posting what you did here in such detail.
     
  7. Danishblunt

    Danishblunt Guest

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    you will need a shim, otherwise your temperatures are abysmal.
     
  8. Ragib Zaman

    Ragib Zaman Notebook Enthusiast

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    Another question - I only have American Megatrends 1.03.1 stock BIOS and vBOIS. I currently have a GTX 780M with the latest drivers installed on Windows 10. If I simply replace the GPU with the 1070, am I correct in assuming I should be able to boot into Windows normally? Would I be able to install the latest NVIDIA drivers normally, or would I a) Be restricted to a certain old driver or b) have to edit INF files to get things to work? As I currently understand it, installing a certain old driver/editing INF files is only required if you are using Prema's BIOS/vBIOS to unlock extra permissions on the GPU, is this correct?

    In the end, I ordered a GTX 1070 MXM 3.0b, not 3.1 like OP, so hopefully I can just replace my GPU with minimal physical modifications to my laptop. Given this, do you think I will still need a shim to get decent temperatures?
     
  9. Danishblunt

    Danishblunt Guest

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    You will have to edit the NVIDIA drivers, but it will boot normally into the system.
    Yes you will need a shim regardless of which pascal card you purchase. the pascal die's are lower in height, hence they don't touch your heatsink as well as it should.
     
  10. Ragib Zaman

    Ragib Zaman Notebook Enthusiast

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    I'm having trouble finding information about the exact measurements Kepler and Pascal dies, which I would need to figure out how thick the copper shim should be. Does anyone have any suggestions?

    What's your opinion on using liquid metal? I've had good results with it, but perhaps using it on both sides of a shim will make the risk of spilling in my laptop too high, so I may go with regular non-conductive thermal paste with the shim.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2018
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